Jump to content

TSB deploys a team to Calgary, Alberta, to assess an aircraft incident


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

I don't remember any mention of an incident but evidently there was one.

 

TSB deploys a team to Calgary, Alberta, to assess an aircraft incident

 

Edmonton, Alberta, 10 February 2016 – The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to the Calgary International Airport to an incident involving a Bombardier DHC-8 operated by WestJet Encore. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

The TSB is an independent agency that investigates marine, pipeline, railway and aviation transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

For more information, contact:
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Media Relations
819-994-8053
media@tsb.gc.ca

The TSB is online at www.tsb.gc.ca. Keep up to date through RSS, Twitter (@TSBCanada), YouTube, Flickr and our blog.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still no report on what is brining them to YYC, They did a fast check on the one in YVR where the tires blew on the takeoff roll.

Incident: Westjet B738 at Vancouver on Feb 1st 2016, rejected takeoff due to blown tyres

 

By Simon Hradecky, created Thursday, Feb 4th 2016 20:39Z, last updated Thursday, Feb 4th 2016 20:39Z

 

A Westjet Airlines Boeing 737-800, registration C-GVWA performing flight WS-1876 from Vancouver,BC (Canada) to Kahului,HI (USA) with 163 people on board, was accelerating for takeoff from Vancouver's runway 08R when at about 120 KIAS one of the left main tyres blew, shortly followed by the second left main tyre. The crew rejected takeoff at high speed, declared emergency and slowed the aircraft bringing the aircraft to a stop about 7200 feet down the runway (runway length 11,500 feet). Emergency services responded and advised there was no fire.

The Canadian TSB reported that the aircraft was disabled on the runway, passengers disembarked onto the runway, the luggage was unloaded, passengers and luggage taken to the terminal. The aircraft needed to be defueled in order to be able to jack the aircraft up, non-standard jacking equipment was needed as the aircraft was slightly lower in this configuration. The runway was closed for a total of 7 hours and 40 minutes. First inspections of aircraft and runway did not identify additional damage to the aircraft or runway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

TSB investigates WestJet 'electrical fault' on flight from Terrace to Calgary

Fire trucks called out after electrical fault detected on WestJet Encore Dash 8 Tuesday night

Wed Feb 10, 2016 - CBC News

The Transportation Safety Board (TSB) is investigating after fire trucks were called out for a WestJet flight from Terrace to Calgary on Tuesday night.

"[The TSB] is deploying a team of investigators to the Calgary International Airport to an incident involving a Bombardier DHC-8 operated by WestJet Encore," the agency said in a release.

Fire trucks were called, but the flight — which was loaded with fuel and 35 people on board — made a safe landing on Tuesday evening.

It's unclear exactly what sparked the emergency measures.

"The aircraft landed safely after crew procedures corrected an electrical fault," said WestJet spokesperson Lauren Stewart.

"At no time was there a danger to the guests or crew," she added.

The Calgary-based airline said it would not provide further information, as the company is working with the TSB to determine the cause of the problem.

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Malcolm said:

 Got to love that report,. "loaded with fuel".....  I guess if it had no fuel there would not have been any problem :P Thanks for the update.

or maybe the ace reporter thought that flights glided the last few feet to the ground when fuel runs out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One other thing is absolutely certain

3 hours ago, Malcolm said:

A Westjet Airlines Boeing 737-800,

Not sure if it is still the correct thing to do, (we used to do it), but normally when one declares an "Emergency" the pilot will inform whomever they are on the radio to "Number of souls on board and the quantity of fuel on board". That information allows the medical staff, fire fighters ,and other first responders to know what they may be looking for, or expect during and after a possible "crash".

Perhaps the reporter only knew that they had a full load of fuel on board and said the same in their report.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kip: Flight inbound from YXT , as you know much better than I would,likely not have a full load of fuel onboard unless they had one hell of a tail wind :lol: but of course they would have reported their pax and fuel load.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, airbrake said:

The dash had an electrical fire in the engine nacelle.   

Had that. Welded starter contact on departure from previous station, undetected during after start check. Problem manifiests self in a generator fire after shutdown as starter is still engaged, overheats, burns.

Not the end of the world, but expensive. And alarming if never experienced.

Are starter malfunctions trained in the simulator? "Deep discharge after starter cut-out"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They sure are Moon :).  

There are AC contactor boxes in the nacelles, and also the FADEC boxes and their own power sources (Permenant Magnetic Alternators) are mounted at each engine.  Of course there's electrical anti-ice equipment on the nacelles and the props that could also be sources of the excitement.  

I'm a bit surprised the TSB would send a "team of investigators" though.  Must have done some serious damage to warrant that no?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The TSB does not necessarily send a team to investigate all occurrences, even those that are fatal.  There are many Class 5 occurrences, where only data or information is added to the file.  The process that is used to determine what will be investigated is outlined on the following site:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada: Occurrence Classification Policy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, CD said:

The TSB does not necessarily send a team to investigate all occurrences, even those that are fatal.  There are many Class 5 occurrences, where only data or information is added to the file.  The process that is used to determine what will be investigated is outlined on the following site:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada: Occurrence Classification Policy

The board must send an investigator to first assess how the board will proceed.  In the case of a declared emergency, Accident or incident, a TSB investigator will be dispatched to the site.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Their criteria for doing an on-site investigation are a little more stringent than showing up for every declaration of an emergency. Otherwise, they'd need 2 bodies at each base just to handle the volume. Trust me, it's way more complex than that.

Edited by J.O.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...