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Air Canada One Way Ticket Deal


mo32a
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I am sure the lawyers will post their views shortly, but there was a similar consumer complaint before the Canadian Transportation Agency last year. Swiss Airlines made a booboo resulting in a number of fares going out at about one percent of their intended price. The airline cancelled them as soon as they figured it out, but a large swatch of people had tickets they had snapped up when the news spread on internet blogs and social media. They claimed they had a right to the mistaken fares.

The Agency dismissed their claims in an involved judgement.

The Agency is only a quasi-judicial body so I suppose the plaintifs could still hire lawyers and take it to a civil court, but I suspect most courts would respect the Agency rulings unless something was really out of whack.

Others may see things differently.

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I look forward to a time where the people complaining about not having their ticket honoured have their employer/business rocked by a clerical error one day. Usually feels different when the tables are turned.

Reminds me of a day dealing with a bunch of irops back around 2000. One of the passengers started yelling at the gate agent about how AC was abandoning the west after the merger with CP and how it was disgusting, blah, blah, blah. The CSM was at the gate and calmly looked through the passengers file and commented, "I see you're traveling on business for [company XYZ]. Last I heard you were shutting down operations in Edmonton, Winnipeg and Calgary... how's that coming along." Discussion quickly ended.

Last year, my dentist under billed me for a procedure. I had no idea. A few months later, I received an invoice for the difference. I went to the office and paid it. Life goes on.

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When I go to the grocery store I pay the price as marked NOT the price as scanned. They should be honoured

Well youngun, the practice you are referring to has an interesting historical footnote - several decades ago, when retailers wanted to stop putting physical price tags on each item in the store and use the barcodes instead, consumer groups resisted saying , "how can we trust you?" To which the retailers replied, "of course you can trust us, it will be computerized so it will always be 100% correct!" The consumer groups were skeptical so the retailers invented the Scanning Code of Practice. Basically, if you find an error, you get the item for free (up to $10 and for the first item only). This page describes it in more detail:

http://canadianbudgetbinder.com/2012/09/26/scanning-code-of-practice-scop-in-canada/

My wife watches the cash register and gets free groceries quite often. If the price comes up different from the shelf price or hasn't been updated with the sale price from the flyer - it's free or $10 off the price if the item is greater than ten dollars. There is a greater likelihood of this happening on the first day of a sale but she often finds stuff at the end of a week long sale that are still mis-priced. When the store is alerted that something is mis-priced they almost immediately change it so the fact that a week later it often isn't changed means that for an entire week everyone that bought that item would have been overcharged.

Not every store participates but even those that do limit the possible consumer benefit to $10.

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.

Air Canada mistaken fares: Winning a lottery or taking advantage?

Regulators say airline price mistakes amplified by social media reach deal-seeking bloggers

Fri Aug 29, 2015 - CBC News
By Jason Proctor

Travel blogger Gary Leff can still conjure up the taste of the all-inclusive breakfast served at the Thai resort — not to mention the pinch of salt in the air outside his palatial beach-front suite.

A room worth $1,000 a night snagged for $33.

It's the kind of deal airlines call "a mistake", but Leff likes to think of it as "winning the lottery."

"It wasn't even so much that I'm thinking 'I paid $33,' — it was 'I'm here!" Leff, a man who's been called an 'Air Genius' for his mastery of the mysteries of frequent flying, told CBC News.

"It was wonderful. I realized I'm not ever going to pay for something like that, but I was certainly getting to enjoy it."


Dream trip at 'deep, deep discount'

Washington, D.C.-based Leff is part of an online army of deal-hunters who keep an eye out for mistakes like the one Air Canada made this week when the airline briefly sold an unknown number of business-class flight passes for a tenth of their $8,000 value.

It's a cat and mouse game between two not-so-innocent competitors: carriers constantly adjusting prices to lure consumers and bloggers trying to beat them at their own game.

Air Canada blamed a computer glitch for the error; the airline says it will refund passengers who haven't already used their passes to book flights. However, they're not planning to honour a mistake.

Leff, who publishes the blog View from the Wing, says that's par for the course in his world: You win some, you lose some.

"The way I view these things is I think it's great to take advantage of the opportunity when it's presented to have a trip of a lifetime at a deep, deep discount," he said. "And if it doesn't work out, then maybe it'll happen sometime again in the future."

Not if North American transportation regulators have anything to do with it.

The. U.S. Department of Transportation used to force airlines to honour mistaken fares. But just this spring, they announced plans to revisit the policy.

The department cites "concern regarding how quickly mistaken fares are spread through postings on aviation and travel websites, forums, and blogs" in a notice about the changes.

'Should an airline have to pay for an honest mistake?'

.

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This isn't a can of soup.

A single clerical/technical employee with instructions to post a fare made a typo. And the employer is supposed to eat a million dollars or more?

If that's the case, employers need to go back to firing people for making big mistakes so that people make sure what they are doing is right.

AC has never reacted very well to these things. This could be turned into something good, AC could say, "If you bought this package, we can't give it to you at 10% but we can give it to you at 10% off". Only a handful of the takers would take them up on it, but AC would look better in the press.

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When I go to the grocery store I pay the price as marked NOT the price as scanned. They should be honoured

Hypothetically speaking... a computer glitch at the checkin kiosk says the charge for a checked bags is double what it actually is. You haven't flown in a while and don't know thats the wrong price, so you pay it. Later that day, you find out that the price is actually half what you paid.

I'm pretty sure most people would be calling the airline to complain and get their money back?

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Maybe true, S80, but you are not liable for millions of dollars as a result of the error of one person and your error did not spread like wildfire through all of the discount buyer forums around the internet.

Somebody would have to make up for the loss... other passengers, shareholders.... it is not just manufactured money. So, for these people to get their great deal, someone else would be subsidizing them.

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Maybe true, S80, but you are not liable for millions of dollars as a result of the error of one person and your error did not spread like wildfire through all of the discount buyer forums around the internet.

It's all relative isn't it. An individuals loss caused by rigid policies and ridiculous fees in terms of relative impact might not be all that different. But for an airline that is something less than accommodating in such situations to those without preferred corporate travel agreements, this seems like a strange situation in which to ask for forgiveness and understanding. Pay up deadbeats.

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The first time I ever visited Real Canadian Superstore there was a big bin of some sort of fruit I had never seen before. There was a lady there picking some out so I asked her what they were etc. They were about the size of a small watermelon. They were priced at $1 each. I figured well I will try one. We did the rest of our shopping and then came to the checkout. When the clerk rang up the fruit it was over $8. When I pointed out that it was supposed to be $1 she called the manager over. I walked with him back to the bin where the sign said $1 each, not per pound. He said that it was wrong and took the sign down. Back to the cashier and he said the price was wrong on the bin and wanted to charge me the $8. I was incredulous but he insisted. We left all the groceries on the belt and walked out. I have never been back since.

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The first time I ever visited Real Canadian Superstore there was a big bin of some sort of fruit I had never seen before. There was a lady there picking some out so I asked her what they were etc. They were about the size of a small watermelon. They were priced at $1 each. I figured well I will try one. We did the rest of our shopping and then came to the checkout. When the clerk rang up the fruit it was over $8. When I pointed out that it was supposed to be $1 she called the manager over. I walked with him back to the bin where the sign said $1 each, not per pound. He said that it was wrong and took the sign down. Back to the cashier and he said the price was wrong on the bin and wanted to charge me the $8. I was incredulous but he insisted. We left all the groceries on the belt and walked out. I have never been back since.

my experience has been quite different at the same stores, they do honour the price posted no matter what the checkin computer says, in fact if the item is under $10.00 then it is free. What Superstore did you visit?

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The first time I ever visited Real Canadian Superstore there was a big bin of some sort of fruit I had never seen before. There was a lady there picking some out so I asked her what they were etc. They were about the size of a small watermelon. They were priced at $1 each. I figured well I will try one. We did the rest of our shopping and then came to the checkout. When the clerk rang up the fruit it was over $8. When I pointed out that it was supposed to be $1 she called the manager over. I walked with him back to the bin where the sign said $1 each, not per pound. He said that it was wrong and took the sign down. Back to the cashier and he said the price was wrong on the bin and wanted to charge me the $8. I was incredulous but he insisted. We left all the groceries on the belt and walked out. I have never been back since.

If it was a durian you got off lucky.

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Maybe the confusion is coming from the Scanner Price Accuracy Code. It works in grocery and retail stores, but I don't think it is for airlines. And it does work when shopping, I've used this procedure to correct many a price indiscretion.


http://www.retailcouncil.org/scanner-accuracy

A retailer adopting the Code must abide by the policies outlined below.

1. THE ITEM FREE SCANNER POLICY
Retailers will implement an Item Free Scanner Policy as follows:

1.1 On a claim being presented by the customer, where the scanned price of a product at checkout is higher than the price displayed in the store or than advertised by the store, the lower price will be honoured; and

(a) if the correct price of the product is $10 or less, the retailer will give the product to the customer free of charge; or
( B) if the correct price of the product is higher than $10, the retailer will give the customer a discount of $10 off the corrected price.

1.2 Where the same error recurs in scanning multiple units of a given product during a given transaction, the retailer will correct the scanning error in respect of each unit of the given product purchased, but is obliged to apply the policy set out in 1.1 (a) and ( B) in respect of only one of the units.

1.3 Paragraph 1.1 only applies after the final sale price of the purchased item has been displayed at the checkout, including relevant rebate, discount or promotional coupons.

1.4 To be eligible for the Item Free Scanner Policy, the product must match the product description on the corresponding shelf tag.

1.5 The Item Free Scanner Policy does not apply if the barcode or shelf label for a given product has been tampered with.

1.6 The Item Free Scanner Policy does not apply to a product where, in respect of that product, the law:

(a) establishes a minimum price (or specified price); or
( B) does not permit the retailer to offer a discount or a rebate.

2.0 CORRECTION OF ERRORS

2.1 Once a scanner pricing error is brought to the attention of the retailer, appropriate steps should be taken as quickly as possible to correct the source of the error.

2.2 When a retailer cannot immediately correct a scanning error in respect of a product, it will post a correction notice in a conspicuous place. Once such a notice has been posted, the Item Free Scanner Policy is no longer in effect in respect of the relevant product.

3.0 RETAILERS' RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 All retailers will apply the Code, consistent with the philosophy and intent. In situations where retailers believe that costumers’ requests are beyond the Code’s intent, these situations will be discussed with sponsoring Associations to ensure consistent application and remedies.

3.2 Retailers will establish appropriate internal policies and procedures for maintaining a high level of scanner price accuracy.

3.3 Retailers will display the sign attached hereto as Attachment 1 at all store entrances or in a conspicuous location near the store entrances. Retailers will display the sign attached hereto as Attachment 2 at each checkout station within their stores.

3.4 Retailers will train staff on the Code generally and the Item Free Scanner Policy in particular.

3.5 Retailers will have copies of their current advertising material (e.g. flyers, etc.) available and readily accessible for customer reference.

4.0 SHELF LABELS

4.1 For those products that are not individually price-ticketed, a clear and legible label must be affixed to the shelf next to the product.

4.2 The shelf label (peg label, basket label) must contain an accurate description of the item and shall include the price of the item or, where the item is sold at a price based on a unit of measurement, the price per unit of measurement.

4.3 The price on the shelf label must be in at least 28-point bold type print, and product description in at least 10-point type print.

4.4 A sign for a given product within the retailer's premises which is not displayed with that product (i.e., is displayed elsewhere within the retailer's premises), shall comply with the minimum requirements described above and be at least 38.71 sq. cm in size.

5.0 CUSTOMER RECEIPTS

5.1 The cash register receipt provided to the customer for a transaction must contain, at a minimum, the following information:
• the retailer's name;
• the date of the transaction;
• the nature of each item purchased and/or any distinguishing mark (subject to the system's limitations); and
• the price and description of each purchased item

6.0 CODE MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION

6.1 A Scanner Price Accuracy Committee ("the Committee") will be created to review the Code on an annual basis and to recommend required amendments. The Committee should be composed of representatives of the Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada, CFIG, RCC and the Consumers' Association of Canada (CAC).

6.2 The Committee should be responsible for keeping the Code up to date.

6.3 The Committee should meet at least twice a year in order to supervise national implementation of the Code and consider any recommended changes to it.

6.4 The Committee should create sector specific panels (i.e. Grocery, Drug or General Merchandise). Each panel should:

(a) be composed of representatives of the respective trade associations and the CAC;
( B) review any outstanding complaints arising from the Item Free Scanner Policy; and
© recommend ways of resolving the complaint and provide relevant direction to the appropriate contact person.

6.5 The Committee shall prepare an annual report for the Competition Bureau concerning the number of complaints received and their resolution.

7.0 CONSUMER COMPLAINT PROCESS

7.1 When a scanner price error occurs, the cashier will be authorized to implement the Item Free Scanner Policy.

7.2 A customer dissatisfied with the cashier's decision will be directed to the store manager or supervisor.

7.3 If the store manager or supervisor cannot resolve the dispute, the customer should be directed to a designated company representative.

7.4 The time period for considering a particular complaint should be left to the discretion of the retailer. However, generally complaints should be resolved as expeditiously as possible and, in any event, no later than one month after the error is alleged to have occurred.

7.5 In the event that the dispute between the retailer and the consumer cannot be resolved:

(a) either party may refer the complaint to the Scanner Price Accuracy Committee; and
( B) if the dispute remains unresolved it may, at the request of either party, be referred to a designated arbitrator on a cost recovery basis.

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Maybe the confusion is coming from the Scanner Price Accuracy Code. It works in grocery and retail stores, but I don't think it is for airlines. And it does work when shopping, I've used this procedure to correct many a price indiscretion.

Signatures to Scanner Price Accuracy Voluntary Code

Shoppers Drug Mart

The Groupe Jean Coutu (NB and ON only)

Lawton Drug Stores

London Drugs

Lovell Drugs

Pharmasave BC

Costco Wholesale Canada Ltd.

The Home Depot Canada

Canadian Tire Corporation Ltd.

Toys r Us

Rona

Wal*Mart Canada Corp.

Giant Tiger Stores Ltd.

The North West Company

Best Buy

2 Home Hardware franchisees

Canada Safeway Limited

The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company of Canada Limited

Loblaw Companies Limited

Sobeys Inc.

Metro Inc.

Thrifty Foods

Costco Wholesale Canada Ltd.

Co-op Atlantic

CFIG Supporting Companies:

Thrifty Foods

Overwaitea Food Group

The Harry Watson Group

Longos Brothers Fruit Markets

Federated Co-operatives Limited

+ 1374 independent locations

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