Sign in to follow this  
John S.

Air Canada Flight Number 624 In The News

Recommended Posts

After looking at the photos blues deville posted I'm thinking the snow probably cushioned the landing and may have very well turned a break-up sequence into a hard landing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After looking at the photos blues deville posted I'm thinking the snow probably cushioned the landing and may have very well turned a break-up sequence into a hard landing.

I can't find the photos you refer to...has the link changed the photos?. I see no photos of the initial contact area or gear going through snow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was the 1R door not used because airframe damage prevented it from being opened properly? I haven't heard any reports about injuries to cabin crew so I assume they were able to complete their evacuation duties. On the A320, how many cabin crew are seated at the forward doors?

Only the In Charge sitting at the front. There used to be two, but with 1:50 the extra FA at L1-A was removed. I read elsewhere that the R1 door was unusable but that's only hearsay so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After looking at the photos blues deville posted I'm thinking the snow probably cushioned the landing and may have very well turned a break-up sequence into a hard landing.

I can't find the photos you refer to...has the link changed the photos?. I see no photos of the initial contact area or gear going through snow.

You have to scroll down a bit and then click the pictures. There are 8 of them.

ac624-rcmp-drone-9.jpg?w=672&h=448&crop=

ac624-rcmp-drone-7.jpg?w=672&h=448&crop=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They didn't include a pic of where the power lines were on the other side of the road. Wasn't the initial touchdown before the road?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm leaning toward the main landing gear after it was taken off and perhaps bounced upwards. The localizer array should have already been taken out by the wings.

Just spit balling here.

The localizer array isn't that high, the wings would most likely go over them. If they were trying to prevent ground contact, the nose would have been at a fairly high angle, thus making the stab low enough to contact the localizer array.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They didn't include a pic of where the power lines were on the other side of the road. Wasn't the initial touchdown before the road?

Not sure if it's been reported as touching down before the berm but apparently it did make contact with the power lines along the road. Several passengers say they witnessed the flash of light from hitting the wires. Not sure why they are not included in any series of photos. I guess a free standing hydro pole doesn't look like that interesting. However in the TSB/Flicker series of photos, someone did include a photo of a female investigator at the accident scene. I guess posting her image is key to solving this incident.

Passing these obstacles twenty feet higher might have been a non-event. Twenty feet lower could have been a disaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a look at he picture of the nose and the right wing. Both pieces have been penetrated by the antenna array. There are pieces hanging from the nose. The Nose was the first point of impact with the array and if I had to guess it was right wing low at the time because the impact point in the photo is dead centre but there are still 2 standards intact on the left but everything on the right is wiped out.

I agree that the gear is likely what took out the stab.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to scroll down a bit and then click the pictures. There are 8 of them.

Thanks...I went too far down and got the eight that are mostly the night shots...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a look at he picture of the nose and the right wing. Both pieces have been penetrated by the antenna array. There are pieces hanging from the nose. The Nose was the first point of impact with the array and if I had to guess it was right wing low at the time because the impact point in the photo is dead centre but there are still 2 standards intact on the left but everything on the right is wiped out.

I agree that the gear is likely what took out the stab.

What altitude is the aircraft supposed to be at directly over the orange array on the hilltop?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What altitude is the aircraft supposed to be at directly over the orange array on the hilltop?

The aircraft should have passed over the runway threshold at 75-100' on a normal profile, well clear of the antenna structure.

The minimums at 1.7 IHZ (the missed approach point) are LOC 740' and NDB 960', which are 273' and 497' above ground. And they would have adjusted the MDA by adding another 20-30 feet due to the reported temperature. Runway 05 touchdown zone elevation is 463'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a good picture of how tall the localizer array was. All but two have been sheered off at their base. Most of the top pieces fell almost straight down after the wing cut through them. I think the only reason the left two are standing is because the wing was to the right of them. If you watch crosswind landings you will notice that the main gear normally track on the downwind side of the runway centre (crab). You can also see both main gear in the snow off to the right of centre.

I guess the pieces of the localizer array that flew over the wing could have hit the horizontal stab. But I doubt they make them heavy enough to do that kind of damage. The one that is embedded in the nose looks like it is fibreglass?

https://twitter.com/CTVNews/status/582303739320623104

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several passengers say they witnessed the flash of light from hitting the wires. Not sure why they are not included in any series of photos. I guess a free standing hydro pole doesn't look like that interesting.

My guess is that since power was restored within a few hours that the wires were restrung soon after and before the sun came up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My guess is that since power was restored within a few hours that the wires were restrung soon after and before the sun came up.

I would think the TSB would be interested to see the knocked down wires as part of their investigation but perhaps not necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

per tsb pictures, initial touch-down was at least a couple hundred feet before the road/wires, in the field. they hit the wires and berm/array on the way up, on the bounce. appears stab taken out by gear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

per tsb pictures, initial touch-down was at least a couple hundred feet before the road/wires, in the field. they hit the wires and berm/array on the way up, on the bounce. appears stab taken out by gear

Where do you see that in the TSB photos??? It looks, to me, they hit AFTER they crossed the road/fence. I would think the gear probably took out the hydro and a brief touchdown as indicated in the snow and then up the hill through the array and then the big slide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think the heading, attitude and track of the aircraft can be accurately determined from the photo evidence at hand, which makes any attempt to determine the physical geometrics of the crash sequence pretty difficult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still begs the question - what were they doing down there, that far out.

I recall the A320 has a knob on the MCP to select STD or Altimeter Baro Setting, and that it is a push to select STD (29.92"/1013.25mb). Are there any warnings if this is not reset from STD? The METAR at the time was about 0.28 below STD but together with a -6 C cold temperature, MDA would be broken by nearly 300 feet.

Time will tell. Still glad nobody physically hurt badly.

One thing that should come of this perhaps: Firehalls at international airports have a separate garage to hold a full size bus that can accompany ARFF vehicles to a crash site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this