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Ryanair Board Approves Plan To Operate To Usa

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The Financial Times said that the European base would be at London’s third airport Stansted, and said other destination/origin airports would include Dublin, Berlin and Cologne in Germany, plus other airports in Spain, Italy and Scandinavia. In the U.S., flights would go to and from Boston, Chicago, Florida, Miami, New York and Washington, D.C., among others.

Nice to see they're going to fly to Florida and Miami.

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I'm thinking O'Leary doesn't have much to learn from WS.

Think again.

They've acknowledged their customer service sucks and impacts their bottom line and are rolling out a number of initiatives that look a lot like the sorts of things WJ already does.

Whether that service culture takes hold there or is simply lip service is a whole other issue.

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Apparently Ryanair stops listening when the word customer comes up.

perhaps but they do know what the "cheap customer" aka "former bus passenger" / airline employee wants. :icon_anal::Grin-Nod:

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Interesting article on Ryanair and how it's evolution.

OPINION: Why O'Leary has reinvented Ryanair
Source: airlinebusiness.png
in 5 hours

The reinvention of Ryanair over the last two years has been remarkable. And the fact that it has happened with one-time low-cost enfant terrible Michael O’Leary at the helm has been all the more astonishing.

But should we really be surprised? O’Leary is nothing if he’s not a pragmatist. So while he’s clearly still uncomfortable having to ooze charm – witness his pain in front of a group of travel management gurus, which he described as one of the most depressing days of his life (see Airline Business's June 2015 issue or here) – O’Leary knows what’s good for the business.

And business is what it’s all about. The old Ryanair made no attempt to encourage corporate types, but O’Leary had seen the success that hybrids like Vueling were having, and he’s watched the transformation of EasyJet under Carolyn McCall.

That’s not to say there was anything too wrong with the old model. The business has generated in excess of $5 billion in net profit over the last decade. How many European legacy carriers can say that?

And there’s something to be said for lowering customers’ expectations. If a passenger loses a suitcase on British Airways, they’ll be straight on the phone or email to complain. But on Ryanair, the expectation was that checked luggage would go AWOL, and it then probably didn’t. Great service! What’s all the fuss about?

But O’Leary recognised that there’s only so much money to be made tapping the leisure market. And having steered Ryanair profitably for such a long period, he acted quickly to re-invigorate it with the new strategy.

Business passengers, who often travel out of season and are prepared to pay more, want some of the benefits that Ryanair didn’t offer – allocated seats and multi-channel distribution being two of the key ones. And that’s something O’Leary has addressed.

EasyJet proved that the “jump to the dark side” was doable, so O’Leary thought “I’ll have some of that”.

But the Irishman’s low-cost mantra hasn’t changed and he admits to being embarrassed by the shiny new headquarters the airline has moved into in Dublin, after years operating from a shabby – and not very chic – office near the airport. But it did the job.

Legend has it that once on a rare visit to the airline’s training centre, as he walked through the door he challenged the P&L of the coffee machine. Rest assured that machine is no longer cost centre.

And his ruthless passenger policies, which have generated countless column inches over the years, have benefited Europe’s entire airline industry. Ryanair has essentially operated a boot camp for passengers, drumming home good discipline around carry-on luggage and self-processing.

But there where other business reasons why a more customer-friendly attitude was needed. Last year, Ryanair made much of its “BBB+” rating from Standard & Poor’s, making it “the highest-rated airline in the world”. But while recognising its “significantly lower cost than its peers”, S&P cautioned that Ryanair’s “reputation of less-friendly customer service” could “slow down passenger volume growth”.

Despite the move upmarket towards the space occupied by EasyJet and others, Ryanair will remain a step apart from rivals. Even McCall concedes that her rival is ahead on cost because of its focus on secondary and tertiary airports and the policy of self-employed crew.

And O’Leary? Despite a decade of teasing that he was close to calling it a day, he is showing no signs that he’s tiring of tackling the big challenges. After 20 years at the helm, in 2014 O’Leary signed up for another five, by which time he expects the airline to be carrying over 120 million passengers. As he told Flightglobal at the Paris air show two years ago: “I’ve four young kids and I sure as hell don’t want to spend any more time at home!”

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Looks like they are doing something right, at least for their shareholders and continue to have money to pay their employees. Seems that they provide the level of service that their passengers want. :Grin-Nod:

Ryanair full-year profit rises by two-thirds
LONDON
Source: pro.png
in 4 minutes

Irish budget carrier Ryanair has turned in a full-year net profit of €867 million ($946 million), a rise of two-thirds.

The airline exceeded previous guidance and its performance followed a 12% rise in revenues to €5.6 billion.

Passenger numbers increased to 90.6 million during the year to 31 March 2015 while load factor rose by five points to 88%.

While the fuel-price decline is reflected in expenditure, unit costs excluding fuel stayed flat despite a push into primary airports, says the carrier.

"Our cost leadership over competitors has widened during the last year," it adds.

"This bodes well for our growth, especially as we move into airports and routes where our competitors are charging markedly higher fares."

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They don't have employees. They have contractors and the way they are treated is embarrassing for the industry. Their contract relationship would never be legal under our tax laws.

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They don't have employees. They have contractors and the way they are treated is embarrassing for the industry. Their contract relationship would never be legal under our tax laws.

So are you saying that all of their staff are "contractors"? Interesting if so and very interesting if as bad as they are made out to be, that they continue to have enough staff to operate and even expand. Must be something we are missing in the equation. I have seen some reports that say their staff, on average leave within 4.8years but I have not been able to find a breakdown by category. Here is a link to a letter issued by their pilot group, I wonder if the forcast turn over happened and if so how the gap was filled. Perhaps that is why they backed off from their transatlantic dreams.

https://www.ryanairpilotgroup.com/sites/default/files/press-releases/RPG%20Press%20Release%20-%20Ryanair%20AGM%20Sept%202014%20-%2021%20Sept%202014.pdf

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They don't have employees. They have contractors and the way they are treated is embarrassing for the industry. Their contract relationship would never be legal under our tax laws.

really....It is happenning right now here

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If the company sets your schedule and dictates where and how you work, then in the eyes of the government you are an employee.

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That is not necessarily True. I worked for years as a contractor and was never an employee and never had CPP, EI, or Tax deducted from a check. It totally depends on how you have yourself setup. It also helps to have more than one contract.

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From both a career and tax pov, pilots would always have been better off as individual contractors versus being an employee of a corporation, but we allowed the same sort of misguided thinking to guide us way back when, and continue to do so today just as the physicians did when they signed up to the OHIP system of pay for their services.

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Ryanair sketches plan for price-comparison function




LONDON

Source: pro.png

16 hours ago




Ryanair will add a price-comparison function to its website in October, but finance chief Neil Sorahan cautions that this does not mean the Irish budget airline is "in the business of being a travel agent".


Sorahan says the "early indications" are that Ryanair will offer a universal display of airlines and their prices, but he adds that the Dublin-based carrier will not offer links to competitors' websites in the event that their prices are lower.


"We are not in the business of being a travel agent. Clearly, if somebody and it's unlikely has a lower fare than us... they will go to their website and find it themselves," he says, adding: "We are so confident that we have the lowest fares that we are going to fare-compare on our website but, no, we are not going to be setting up shop as a travel agent."


Other changes planned under the carrier's three-year "Always getting better" customer-service campaign include an insurance opt-out from September, a new website design, and a fare holding option from October.


The airline is seeking to "get better personalisation on the app and mobile website, and indeed the desktop website, as we enhance that and... better target our customers", adds Sorahan.


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Everyone does better Financially as a contractor. The problem is you are then responsible 100% for Benefits, Pension, Job loss, Etc. With great reward comes great risk and little security. I gave up contracting shortly after 9/11 due to the down turn and lack of work.

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