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B777 Damaged At Yyc


manwest

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Saw this posted on another site not sure if accurate. anyone know?

An Air Canada 777-300ER C-FIUR (fin 735, MSN 35242) sustained "significant" damage last night after it hit (or was hit by) a piece of equipment on the ramp at YYC just prior to operating flight 844 to FRA. The flight was cancelled and the aircraft has been towed to apron 2 at Calgary where it remains. Nobody has said anything officially yet, but a CADORS entry is sure to be made in the coming days. There are rumours that an AC mx crew flew in to YYC from YVR this morning to inspect the damage

:cool::cool::cool:

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Guest longtimer

From YYC.COM

Departures for Monday May 12, 2014

Last Updated Time: 19:15 MT Go to Current Time

AIRLINE

FLIGHT NO

DEPARTING TO

GATE

SCHED

STATUS

Air Canada AC844 Frankfurt A24 18:25 CANCELLED

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Belt loader ran into the fuselage below the bulk cargo door... looks like substantial damage for sure. The aircraft was scheduled into a heavy maintenance facility within the next couple of days for a big "check" anyway... now someone needs to figure out how to get it there. It may require major repair before it can even be ferried out...

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Belt loader ran into the fuselage below the bulk cargo door... looks like substantial damage for sure.

Time for some proximity sensors on equipment that comes into contact with aircraft. It would be a lot cheaper than dealing with even occasional major ramp rash. Maybe even "self-parking" loaders and catering trucks.

Of course we haven't yet installed bridge slides so, even though prox sensors are almost standard equipment on cars nowadays, it will be at least 20 years before this idea gets traction. :glare:

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I would estimate that 20-25% of the time I operated through YYC (and YEG) this past winter, the pushback was a training event. I wonder if a general lack of experience in YYC could cause a belt-loader to become a show stopper like that?

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Once I was dealing with bombardier Engineering on a ramp rash event on an engine cowl... We had an aircraft in final assembly at the time and he asked if I would like the damage to be created while it was being manufactured and then repaired to save me the phone call in a couple of months. It seems every one of our aircraft sustained the same damage at some point.

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What ever happened to the training that stressed the need, when approaching an aircraft, to apply the brakes and come to a full stop before driving the final distance to the aircraft? Seems to me that driving discipline needs to be investigated and enforced.

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What ever happened to the training that stressed the need, when approaching an aircraft, to apply the brakes and come to a full stop before driving the final distance to the aircraft? Seems to me that driving discipline needs to be investigated and enforced.

And normally a two person operation for any equipment that approaches an aircraft. One driver. One marshaller.

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What ever happened to the training that stressed the need, when approaching an aircraft, to apply the brakes and come to a full stop before driving the final distance to the aircraft? Seems to me that driving discipline needs to be investigated and enforced.

In this latest yyc event, it seems the driver of the belt loader claims the engine was sputtering and about to stall just as he was on final approach to the aircraft, so he goosed the throttle in an attempt to keep the engine going... and the engine roared to life... blah, blah, blah... what else would he say, he's trying to preserve his job. These guys get fired at the drop of a hat these days.

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Guest longtimer

In this latest yyc event, it seems the driver of the belt loader claims the engine was sputtering and about to stall just as he was on final approach to the aircraft, so he goosed the throttle in an attempt to keep the engine going... and the engine roared to life... blah, blah, blah... what else would he say, he's trying to preserve his job. These guys get fired at the drop of a hat these days.

Crunching an aircraft is not exactly "the drop of a hat".
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I guess ramp rash occurs everywhere to everyone. Orlando and Calgary.

I don't think it's going to stop any time soon either. Boeing has designed a temporary patch system for the 787 allowing the aircraft to fly back to a maintenance base for a complete repair.

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