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Malaysia 777 Missing


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Malaysian press reports MH370 landed safety in Nanming, China

UNCONFIRMED

Sky News: Authorities at Nanning Airport in China deny internet rumors that missing jet made emergency landing there

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Malaysia B772 over Gulf of Thailand on Mar 8th 2014, aircraft missing

Saturday, Mar 8th 2014 01:10Z, last updated Saturday, Mar 8th 2014 02:23Z

By Simon Hradecky - avherald

An Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200, registration 9M-MRO performing flight MH-370 from Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) to Beijing (China) with 227 passengers and 12 crew, was enroute at FL350 over the Gulf of Thailand in contact with Subang Center (Malaysia) when radar and radio contact was reported lost with the aircraft at around 02:40L (18:40Z Mar 7th). The aircraft would have run out of fuel by now, there have been no reports of the aircraft turning up on any airport in the region.

The airline confirmed the aircraft is missing, a search and rescue operation has been initiated. Subang Air Traffic Control reported at 02:40 local Malaysian time, that radar and radio contact with the aircraft had been lost.

Search missions have been launched along the estimated flight track of the aircraft from Gulf of Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia to China (South China Sea).

China reported that the aircraft did not enter Chinese airspace.

According to The Aviation Herald's radar data the aircraft was last regularly seen at 17:22Z (01:22L) about half way between Kuala Lumpur and Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam) at FL350 over the Gulf of Thailand about 260nm northnortheast of Kuala Lumpur 40 minutes into the flight, followed by anomalies in the radar data of the aircraft over the next minute (the anomalies may be related to the aircraft but could also be caused by the aircraft leaving the range of the receiver).

Aviation sources in China report that radar data suggest a steep and sudden descent of the aircraft, during which the track of the aircraft changed from 024 degrees to 333 degrees. The aircraft was estimated to contact Ho Chi Minh Control Center (Vietnam) at 01:20L, but contact was never established.

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Forgive me if this sounds stupid but how do you "lose" an airplane? I would think that an aircraft could be tracked pretty accurately, no?

Well I guess you could say lost because they don't know where the aircraft is. I think it's unlikely they got much further than their last known position. I believe it was dark. I would expect some debris pictures to show up soon.

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Seems odd that they would include the Nanning speculation in their press release. Just adds another layer of hope/dispair.

We are fortunate that these terrible accidents don't happen very often, but it's must be a terrible time for the families of those on board.

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This may have just became a real tragedy for everyone involved. Its being reported that the missing aircraft was involved in a wing tip collision a few years ago.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2576353/Malaysian-Airlines-Boeing-777-centre-crash-probe-collided-plane-two-years-ago-breaking-wingtip.html

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This is beginning to look like a very elaborate & long-planned out hijacking. Something along the lines of the Ethiopian 767 many years ago, or God-forbid, EgyptAir from a few years ago, but in much more detail and preparations. If no wreckage is found in the next 48 hours, this mystery could take much longer to solve. On the other hand, how do you hide a 777 once on the ground somewhere?

The ONLY benefit to this wild hypothesis is that many/most of the passengers & crew may still be alive. :crossfingers:

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Guest longtimer

Not an expert but I guess a very rapid descent to below radar scanning level whatever that is. Or have I been reading too many "penny dreadful's"? Then of course where does the airplane go?

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Search and rescue teams have now spotted debris floating on the water surface. Fortunately the sea in that area is not too deep which should help in locating the CVR/DFR's.

http://www.cnn.com/video/standard.html?/video/us/2014/03/08/newday-quest-malaysia-plane-search.cnn&hpt=hp_t1&from_homepage=yes&video_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn.com%2F

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Search and rescue teams have now spotted debris floating on the water surface. Fortunately the sea in that area is not too deep which should help in locating the CVR/DFR's.

Yeah, Google Earth shows the average depth of The Gulf of Thailand is less than 200'. If it is in the water, it should be found quickly. But it's been over 24 hours. One thing we are not being told is if any unusual seismic data occurred. There are many things we are not being told.

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Sky News has posted a picture of what they say might be an aircraft door.. I don't believe it is... Can't post the picture myself, but here's a link to the story;

http://news.sky.com/story/1222942/malaysia-airlines-suspected-fragments-found

The link shows an oil slick which is apparently consistent with aircraft crashes. So one would assume a large slick indicates impact more or less in one piece (or at least a wing) rather than fragmented after an explosion from a bomb.

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TG&M same story

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/vietnam-may-have-found-door-from-missing-jet/article17385313/

...The state-run Thanh Nien newspaper cited Lt. Gen. Vo Van Tuan, deputy chief of staff of Vietnam’s army, as saying searchers in a low-flying plane had spotted an object suspected of being a door from the missing jet. It was found in waters about 90 kilometres south of Tho Chu island, in the same area where oil slicks were spotted Saturday.

On a straight-line (great circle) WMKK to ZBAA, this location is within 10 miles of that line. The water in that area is between 50 & 250 feet deep.

But, that's it? A door? After nearly 36 hours of searching?

Hurry up & wait, I guess...

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Troubling situation, knowing so little.

Unlike the AF disaster in bad weather, this one happened on good weather, 40 minutes out from KL (not two hours as per initial reports).

Crew has no time to send even an SOS, which is strange enough. Has to be a particularly sudden onset of serious trouble not to get an SOS off.

No transponder?

Terror theory - Why no claims of responsibility.

Missile theory - Plane was far too high (cruising altitude) for a MANPAD, unless a foreign military made a critical mistake.

Catastrophic engine failure - but even if one engine exploded, would that trigger a descent so sudden and steep no signal could be sent.

Suicide? - It's happened, and can't be dismissed yet.

Plane suffered sudden structural failure - This seems almost completely implausible.

Fuel tank explosion - like TWA 800 except that aerospace community has done much to ensure this kind of accident is impossible

Alternate terror theory - terrorists had bombs on board for their connecting flights from Beijing on western carriers, but one went off prematurely. A mistake would explain why there is no claim of responsibility. But how could you get multiple bombs on the same aircraft?

In the end, these catastrophes often end up with more mundane answers, reflecting multiple, cascading issues, but this one is going to have people concerned for some time.

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That picture in the Sun article does not look like a B777 door. The window looks far too large by proportion.

I read elsewhere that the so-called oil slick may be nothing more than an occurrence of "red tide", so the mystery will continue for some time. When AF447 happened, several large pieces of debris were found in fairly short order, and that was in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. This aircraft disappeared off radar and the last known position is well documented and relatively close to shore. The fact that nothing substantive has been found so far is pretty hard to believe.

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The picture of the "door" shows a window in the middle like an emergency exit. I am not 100% sure but the aircraft pictured in the Sky article shows no visible overwing emergency exits. The cabin door windows are high and off centre of the door. Red Herring I should think.

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