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Had stopped off at the Wendy's to watch. With binocs in hand, watched this a/c rotate and climb. Number two engine did catch fire for five to seven seconds. Engine was throttled back, leveled out and tower contacted. From my pilots prespective, professionally handled. Let the investigation reveal the cause.

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Hey Kip, here's yer summary, according to twit's tweets:

"Seems my plane fell apart! Luckily we managed to land it," Jason Flick tweeted, adding that the plane spent 20 minutes dropping fuel and landed heavy.

"What sucks is hundreds of people tucked into a small area and no air-conditioning," Flick said in his final tweet.

Are there no workhouses...sigh.

Don

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I would love to know if this is one of the planes that have had work done in China or elsewhere.

This sounds like it was a catastrophic engine failure. Are engine overhauls being performed in China?

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Hey Kip, here's yer summary, according to twit's tweets:

"Seems my plane fell apart! Luckily we managed to land it," Jason Flick tweeted, adding that the plane spent 20 minutes dropping fuel and landed heavy.

"What sucks is hundreds of people tucked into a small area and no air-conditioning," Flick said in his final tweet.

Are there no workhouses...sigh.

Don

Oh_the_Drama.jpg

More from the hearty souls :biggrin1: .....

Passenger Bryce Saito said he knew the engine died because there was no noise coming out of it some 15 minutes into the flight.

“That’s when I grabbed my chair. ‘Oh, crap am I going to fall?” he said.

Another passenger, Jason Flick, 42, said he was “quite surprised” that people on board remained calm. “I seemed to be more scared than everyone else.”

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This sounds like it was a catastrophic engine failure. Are engine overhauls being performed in China?

The location of the work performed only adds to dramatize the story and is not important.

The story is the GE90 engine itself and the fine job the pilots performed in executing an engine out return from flight after take off

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It's all about him...

"Another passenger, Jason Flick, 42, said he was 'quite surprised' that people on board remained calm. 'I seemed to be more scared than everyone else.' "

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Not the kind of person you want around when the 's' hits the fan.

The RR failure on QF32 showed that this kind of failure is extremely serious. GE will be all over this. The question about maintenance needs to be asked but one would think any outsourcing would have to meet rigid standards, audits and inspections, unless all that's outsourced as well...

I expect that recent events will be on some minds and I hope that those doing the internal investigation into the failure will keep the safety work completely separate from the industrial matters.

Don

Edited by Don Hudson
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I would love to know if this is one of the planes that have had work done in China or elsewhere.

I don't know why people bring this up! Do you realize that almost EVERYTHING you use is made in China? Little known fact is that soon, practically everything you will eat will be from China too. If you apply probabily, small safety/quality issues from Chinese goods and services would have a siignificant impact to our daily life.

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Bottom line; fuel is heavier than air and gravity ultimately will bring it down. In this case, a significant amount probably did end up in the lake? Nonetheless; dissemination of the fuel over a larger area is an insult to the environment, much like the Japanese radiation that's presently circling the planet?

I don’t have any immediate answers to this problem, but being it’s my industry, I do feel a sense of guilt for the consequences we bring to every other living thing, and ourselves.

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Dumping some fuel over the lake is preferable to splattering them all over the end of some runway when the gear collapses to a heavy landing gone wrong. Sometimes you must err on the side of safety.

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Bottom line; fuel is heavier than air and gravity ultimately will bring it down. In this case, a significant amount probably did end up in the lake? Nonetheless; dissemination of the fuel over a larger area is an insult to the environment, much like the Japanese radiation that's presently circling the planet?

I don’t have any immediate answers to this problem, but being it’s my industry, I do feel a sense of guilt for the consequences we bring to every other living thing, and ourselves.

Do you drive a car? Heat your home? Eat food that was trucked across the continent?

That's a lot of guilt to be carrying around.

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Fido

If one fly’s over the Toronto harbour front following the passage of thunderstorms typically associated with strong cold fronts, you will notice the City sewer drain, located about mid-harbour. You can’t miss the contrast; an ink black BP style Gulf oil leak in relatively shallow aqua-marine coloured water. The effluent oozes off to the east meandering along the shoreline until it finally disappears twenty miles or so on.

So, yes; I’m aware of at least the visuals of the City’s droppings as they may impact on the lake environment. Ugly as it may be, your remark; “there are more hydro-carbons washing off the streets and into the lake everyday than an event like this would contribute”, isn’t accurate. It’s only during and after periods of natural douching that a comparative study might be made, but not during dry periods. Then, there’s Halifax...

I think we’re doing ourselves and the planet a great disservice when we shallowly justify our current sin by comparatively shifting the focus to another of our great failures. Perhaps the more important consideration might involve the recognition of one fact; our disgusting ways are all cumulative in their effect / affect.

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Yes to all you questions Dagger. I eat & crap too, just like the other 7 Billion of us. One way or another, we need to get off the 'babies, jobs & growth' at all costs profit-train.

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I have my own vehicle Macolm, but don't commute nor do I use public transit. Fact is, I really like home and generally don't get too far from it. Yes, I do have certain guiltly feelings about my overall impact on the natural environment. In that regard and because I live in a very natural environment, my guilt forces me to make every reasonable effort to give back. BTW, zero kids too.

And you?

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