2011 Summer BBQ thread


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We did one of these threads last year and I tried some of the suggestions. To my utter amazement and with immense gratitude, many of the ideas took off. They actually flew and were a big hit.

So what are folks doing new or refining this year?

Anybody got suggestions for BBQ'ing wings or pizza?

Favourite seasoning or marinade on steaks.

Any hot dog tricks?

What about toasting buns?

And how come I cant find a BBQ set with a nice long cutting knife?

(and I have used several aviation terms/phrases above to qualify this as a legitimate thread on an aviation boaed)

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My favourite "gourmet" quicky on the BBQ is pork tenderloin. They are inexpensive, quick to cook and very tasty. I like to coat mine with a bit of olive oil and a coating/sprinlking of Spike-Gourmet Natural seasoning (salt free). Put them on the barbie, turning every 5 minutes for about 15 minutes and then for the last 5 minutes or so, basting with Diana Sauce-Gourmet Maple. Be carefule not to overcook. If you have had them on the grill for 30 minutes, it may be too late for them! Add your favourite veggies (asparagus or beans), rice or potato salad, and you've got yourself one heck of a fine tasting meal!:tu:

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A super marinade is:

1 cup olive oil

3-4 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar

2-3 tablespoons dark soy sauce

3-4 chopped cloves garlic

4 tablespoons orange marmalade

pinch of thyme

mix up well, use as marinade for at least 3-4 hours, for best results, overnight.

Awesome on chicken or pork.

Edited by deicer
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After our trip to Tuscany last fall, we have been doing our steaks Florentine style - marinated about 30 min with olive oil, coarse salt, pepper and lots of fresh herbs - I use thyme and rosemary, then cooked over high heat and served quite rare. It works especially well with the leaner cuts, which sometimes lack flavour.

For ribs, I started using this method last year, with great success:

http://www.putporkonyourfork.com/all_about_pork/how_to/make_perfect_pork_ribs.html

For storebought bbq sauce, I find that they're either too sweet or too smokey, so I use half Diana's and half smokey flavour. Sounds wishy washy, but it gives it a nice balance of flavour.

For pork tenderloin, this family favourite isn't actually done on the grill - although you could probably modify the recipe, but it's such a great summer meal, I though I should include it anyway:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Island-Pork-Tenderloin-Salad-108103

Looking forward to trying Deicer's marinade, and if anyone has a better rib method, I'd love to try it.

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Here's my favourite Jerk Chicken recipe. I saw Michael Smith make it on TV and adjusted the recipe a bit to my own taste. It's a little bit of extra work and needs to be babysat when it's cooking, but well worth the results.

Marinade:

  • 3 tbsp of ground allspice
  • 1 - 3 chile peppers - coarsely chopped (I use Thai chiles)
  • 2 - 3 bunches of green onions - coarsely chopped (use the tops as well as the main part)
  • 6 limes - zested and juiced
  • 1/3 cup of molasses (you can use honey if you're stuck)
  • 3/4 cup of olive oil
  • Salt to taste

  • 12 pieces of chicken - bone in and skin on (I like to use thighs)

Put the marinade ingredients in a blender and blend well. Put the marinade and the chicken pieces into a large bowl and cover (or put it in a Ziplock freezer bag). Marinade in the fridge overnight - but not less than 4 hrs if you're in a hurry. Longer marinading means better flavour. I've even tried 2 days when our dinner plans changed at the last minute.

Take the chicken out of the fridge at least an hour before cooking and let it come to room temperature. Preheat the grill to medium - don't let it get too hot or the sugars in the marinade will burn. Shake off the excess marinade prior to putting the chicken on the grill. Discard the marinade.

Oil the grill well and put the chicken on. Have a spray bottle filled with water ready to take care of any flareups. Do not leave the grill - you need to be there to watch for the inevitable flare-up. Cook the chicken about 10-15 minutes on each side, until the meat is firm and the juices run clear. Don't turn the meat too soon or the skin will stick to the grill. Allow it to cook until it releases from the grill on its own. A little bit of blackening is expected on jerk chicken, so don't panic when you see this.

I serve this with brown rice that I toast in browned butter prior to adding the water.

For those who love the tangy flavour of the marinade, an option is to set aside some of the marinade and make a dipping sauce. Simmer it in a pot until it thickens - it should coat the back of a spoon - and serve it in side bowls. It doesn't take a lot.

Edited by J.O.
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Here's another great summer recipe for a salad that requires some grilling. It's another Food Network recipe and has become a summer staple around our house.

Roasted Corn & Red Pepper Arugula Salad

  • 3 ears of corn, husks and silks removed
  • 1 x red bell pepper, roasted, peeled and diced
  • 1 x yellow bell pepper, roasted, peeled and diced
  • 2 cups of arugula (500 ml) (I have used baby spinach but it lacks the peppery bite of the arugula)
  • 1/2 cup of thinly sliced red onion (125 ml)
  • 1/2 cup of feta cheese crumbled (125 ml)
  • 2 tbsp of balsamic vinegar (30ml)
  • 6 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil (90 ml)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the barbecue to medium (300°F/150°C).

To roast the corn and peppers, coat evenly with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

Oil the grill and grill the vegetables, turning until the skins on the peppers chars and blisters and the corn kernels turn golden and bright yellow.

Remove the peppers from the grill and place in a large bowl. Cover the bowl with a plate for about 10 minutes to let the steam loosen the charred skin. Place the corn on a tray and let cool.

Once cool, remove the skins and seeds from the peppers. Roughly dice and place in a large bowl. Strip the kernels from cobs with a sharp knife and add to the bowl. Add the arugula and toss.

Add the sliced red onion and crumble feta over the salad. Toss again to ensure the salad is well mixed.

Whisk together the olive oil and balsamic vinegar and drizzle over the salad just before serving.

Edited by J.O.
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After putting a rub on ribs and wrapping them tight in foil I leave them on the BBQ for a minimum of 8 hours with one burner on low, changing the smoke boxes out to freshen them with new soaked chips. I take them off at the end of the day, pour hot, home made sweet BBQ sauce over them and chill over night. Place them on the BBQ the next day to warm and glaze up the ribs. I don't have a recipe written down but I usually have people talking about these for years after they have had them.

Edited by Spinnaker
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No, foil comes off and the end of the first day, put them direct on the grill the next day long enough to make them hot only. Think of a house fire, smoke gets in to everything so it will penetrate the foil while keeping the moisture in if wrapped properly. I also have Nat gas on my grill but don't sweat the amount of propane, it uses very little with one burner on low. I'm using a 10 year old Weber grill and it is efficient.

'Use the force'... on amounts, but this is what I tend to use: garlic powder, onion powder, chilli, cumin, paprika (hungarian for rich colour... also the secret ingredient to good tandoori chicken BTW), cayenne to taste. I've thrown a pinch of curry in at times and it was good too. Avoid salt. Avoid sugar at this stage as it can burn.

You can also wrap the ribs in onions and even some apple or apricot slices with that. They mostly dissolve leaving just flavour behind. The rest fall off in to your sauce after you coast the ribs anyway.

For a sauce base I use Organic Ketchup (it just tastes better), Molasses, mustard, worcestershire... I spice it using some of the above, sometimes I put a pinch of cinnamon and thyme. Balance the sweet and sour out using brown sugar and vinegar. Start with the sweet and add vinegar sparingly. I also thin it a bit using whiskey and that really ties the flavours together. No whiskey? Try a bit of rum or beer.

I like to serve this meal with a mango/red onion/cilantro salad, and curried jasmine or basmati rice.

Ribs are really artistic license so I hate using a recipe. The slow cooking is key (no water!) and the sauce has to be sweet with a hint of sour and spice is the key in my opinion.

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Our place gets packed on the weekend. Probably 10-15 folks on a good hot day june through aug. This past weekend it was a father's day brunch for about 20 and I don;t even have kids. Eggs,bacon,sausage pancakes, toast, all done on my rapidly deteriorating grill.

Anything neat suggestions for those kind of crowd event's. I will be trying most of the recipes on here (Jerk Chicken? - Ok, what the heck!) but I'd go broke buying steak and ribs for the masses every weekend.

Edited by Specs
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Hi Specs

Try mini pizzas.

Make up bowls of whatever toppings you want. Think outside the box, avocado, fruits, meats, cheeses, sauces, etc.

Then use small tortillas as the base, set up a station next to the grill and have everyone make their own mini pizza, pop on grill to heat though.

Quick, easy to make, easy to clean up, and everyone has their own individual creation.

Just a thought...

Iceman

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Hey Spinny that looks like it might be right up my alley, especially since I have a smoker I don't use all that often! Any guess as to what kind of temperature you might target?

I think my old Webber holds about 200F with one burner on low using natural gas. Propane may be about 25C hotter. I start them higher to get them going, when they start talking I turn them down. I've made them so much I don't really think about it anymore.

As I teenager I grilled steaks at the Keg and find them boring so I like a challenge on the BBQ. The rib process came from one of the rib carts at a competition in Ottawa. I was on an overnight there in 2004 and the guy who gave me the run down held trophies for his ribs around the world. I also like slow roasting Lamb and I'll bet a real smoker would do well with that. The regular BBQ does ok with chip boxes but if you have the real thing, let me know how it works. I've been looking at them for years.

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Hi Specs

Try mini pizzas.

Make up bowls of whatever toppings you want. Think outside the box, avocado, fruits, meats, cheeses, sauces, etc.

Then use small tortillas as the base, set up a station next to the grill and have everyone make their own mini pizza, pop on grill to heat though.

Quick, easy to make, easy to clean up, and everyone has their own individual creation.

Just a thought...

Iceman

I use a pizza stone on the grill to make a clay oven effect for Naan (I like making Indian Feasts too). The Naan also makes a great pizza crust if you keep the toppings light, you can even give it an Indian flare using curried meat or tandoori meats.

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I think my old Webber holds about 200F with one burner on low using natural gas. Propane may be about 25C hotter. I start them higher to get them going, when they start talking I turn them down. I've made them so much I don't really think about it anymore.

As I teenager I grilled steaks at the Keg and find them boring so I like a challenge on the BBQ. The rib process came from one of the rib carts at a competition in Ottawa. I was on an overnight there in 2004 and the guy who gave me the run down held trophies for his ribs around the world. I also like slow roasting Lamb and I'll bet a real smoker would do well with that. The regular BBQ does ok with chip boxes but if you have the real thing, let me know how it works. I've been looking at them for years.

Thanks! I was thinking 180-200F so that pretty much nails it!

I haven't had my smoker for long and I've been using it for smoking sausage that I'm making, but it'll do anything. It's easy to build a smoker too, and you should consider it before you go and drop a pile of cash at Cabela's or the like. Because I smoke lots of sausage at a time, I used an old Kelvinator fridge that I gutted(it can smoke about 120 lbs at a time), then threw and old BBQ burner in the bottom... and voila, you have a smoker.

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Rainbow trout with (unsalted) butter, sea-salt, fresh ground pepper and some fresh chives from the garden on top.

Cedar planked salmon is also a favorite.

BBQ fresh veggies are a must. Asparagus and red pepper grilled with some olive oil and again a bit of coarse sea salt and pepper...

Very easy, and minimal prep required.

The key: don't over do it, and wash it down with a nice white wine.

A tip of the glass to Specs for starting one of the most enjoyable threads this year!

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P.S. - it's just my opinion, but boiling or braising ribs is sacrilege. sick.gif The best flavour gets left behind.

I can say the same of gas BBQ which is not really BBQ. Any self-respecting BBQ meister knows that it's lump wood charcoal or nothing at all. Gas BBQ is shorthand for a gas oven. Flame away... :-)

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I can say the same of gas BBQ which is not really BBQ. Any self-respecting BBQ meister knows that it's lump wood charcoal or nothing at all. Gas BBQ is shorthand for a gas oven. Flame away... :-)

I'd like to say between wood chips and cedar planks I have made some rather tasty creations. For steak I can actually do more with a Hibatchi on a beach....

(don't get me wrong... I'd like a smoker)

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I can say the same of gas BBQ which is not really BBQ. Any self-respecting BBQ meister knows that it's lump wood charcoal or nothing at all. Gas BBQ is shorthand for a gas oven. Flame away... :-)

You must be a Ted Reader fan! wink.gif

I agree with you and now that I have more time, I no longer need the convenience of gas. When my current grill is finished, I will be changing back to lump wood charcoal. I've got my eyes on a Big Green Egg or a Traeger.

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