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First used Australian fighter jets land in Cold Lake, Alta.

Two F-18 fighter jets touched down in Cold Lake, Alta., this weekend as the first of 18 interim aircraft arrive in Canada over the next three years.

Canada is getting 18 interim fighter jets over the next 3 years

CBC News · Posted: Feb 17, 2019 7:45 PM MT | Last Updated: February 17
 
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Two F-18 Hornet jets arrived in Cold Lake, Alta., this weekend. (Dept. of National Defence)
Two F-18 fighter jets touched down in Cold Lake, Alta., this weekend — the first of 18 interim aircraft to arrive in Canada over the next three years.

In a press release Sunday, the Department of National Defence called the arrival of the aircraft an "important milestone and investment in sustaining our current CF-18 Hornet fleet."

The single-seat aircraft arrived from Nellis, Nevada, where they were participating in a military exercise, the department said.

Canada is buying the 18 fighter aircraft and materials from Australia for approximately $90 million to replace its ageing fleet. 

The total cost of the interim aircraft, including modifications, inspections and changes to infrastructure and program costs, is estimated to be $360 million. 

 

The Hornets are the same type Canada has now, which the defence department said can be integrated quickly into the existing fleet.

 

"The interim fighter fleet is key to ensuring the Royal Canadian Air Force can continue to fulfill their missions and ensure the safety of Canadians and Canada," said Harjit S. Sajjan, Canada's minister of defence. "We are familiar with these aircraft and are confident that they can provide the additional support our current fleet requires."

 

The remaining 16 planes will be delivered at regular intervals for the next three years. 

f-18.jpgMembers of the Royal Canadian Air Force greet the pilot of a CF-18 jet in Cold Lake, Alta., on Sunday. (Dept. of National Defence)

 

Canadian companies have been contracted to modify the planes to match the configuration of Canada's CF-18 aircraft.

The final aircraft are expected to arrive by the end of 2021.

The formal request for proposals for the future fighter jets is expected to be released in spring 2019. The Department of National Defence is aiming to award a contract in by 2022 with the aircraft to be delivered in 2025.

The City of Cold Lake is about 300 kilometres northeast of Edmonton and is home to 4 Wing Cold Lake, the busiest fighter base in Canada.

In December 2018, the federal government announced it will be moving part of the aircraft testing operations from CFB Cold Lake to the international airport in Ottawa.

Cold Lake Mayor Craig Copeland is concerned moving the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment (AETE) will result in lost jobs for the city.

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1 hour ago, Malcolm said:

"The interim fighter fleet is key to ensuring the Royal Canadian Air Force can continue to fulfill their missions and ensure the safety of Canadians and Canada," said Harjit S. Sajjan, Canada's minister of defence.

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Edited by Kip Powick

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The actual replacement of the current fight jet fleet is getting more interesting. Boeing and Lockheed Martin are both promoting upgrades of fourth generation aircraft. Boeing is offering a non-stealth upgrade of the F-15, and now LM is trying to drum up interest in a hybrid F22/F35 which would be stealthy. This hybrid was offered to the Japanese, so presumably it would be available to other foreign buyers approved by the US.

 

https://www.defenseone.com/business/2018/08/lockheed-pitching-f-22f-35-hybrid-us-air-force/150943/

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What's Canada bitchin' about? Our CF-18's are barely 30 years old! 

 

RAF Tornado flypast marks active service retirement

  • 19 February 2019
 

Crowds have gathered to watch the last official flights of the RAF Tornado.

The aircraft will be flown over many of the country's RAF bases in a series of flypasts before leaving active service at the end of March.

Tornados first took to the skies in 1979, seeing action in several conflicts, and were first used in live operations during the Gulf War in 1991.

Hundreds of people turned out to watch the first leg of the aircraft's final farewell.

After leaving its home base of RAF Marham in Norfolk, the aircraft was seen over Rutland, the West Midlands, North Wales, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire.

 

 

Although no longer to be used in active service, they will still be flown as part of air force training.

"As the Tornados have retired from frontline flying service, we at RAF Cosford have started to take them in because we can use them for engineering in years going forward," Sqn Ldr Chris Wilson explained from the base, which was among points visited on Tuesday.

"Although they won't fly with the air force going forward, they will continue giving excellent service on the ground for many years to come."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-47291557?fbclid=IwAR3XXC22dCihdV19os02jmn8PDf5vWZ99l-f1wmlLG7P1rZ994hQYBPcrcU

 

Edited by Maverick

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National Defence lowballing cost of used Aussie fighters: budget officer

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by The Canadian Press

Posted Feb 28, 2019 8:00 am MST

Last Updated Feb 28, 2019 at 8:22 am MST

 

OTTAWA — The parliamentary budget officer is poking holes in the Defence Department’s cost estimates for buying and operating second-hand fighter jets from Australia, saying its own figures put the cost 22 per cent higher than reported.

Budget watchdog Yves Giroux says the federal government will pay nearly $1.1 billion to buy, upgrade and fly the 18 aircraft alongside Canada’s existing CF-18s over the next decade.

Giroux says that’s $200 million more than the Defence Department’s own estimate because he believes it will cost more to extend the lives of the 30-year-old Australian planes than officials have said.

Giroux’s study comes less than two weeks after the Royal Canadian Air Force officially received the first of two Australian planes at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake in Alberta.

The Trudeau government is buying the 18 Australian planes and up to seven spares to bolster Canada’s aging CF-18s until the entire fleet can be replaced with brand-new jets in the coming decade.

The purchase is going ahead despite the federal auditor general last fall saying the air force did not have enough pilots and mechanics to operate the 76 CF-18s it has now.

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