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AC groomer on drug trial.


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The Toronto Star

(Wed 01 Jun 2005 - Page: B7) Byline: Mike Funston

An Air Canada employee who hatched a scheme to import drugs hidden on board flights from Jamaica was earning up to $50,000 a month from the criminal activity, a Brampton court heard.

Jeff Cahill, who earned about $18 an hour cleaning aircraft, made his job more lucrative in 1999 and 2000 by smuggling hashish and cocaine hidden by drug couriers inside the walls and ceilings of planes, an Ontario Superior Court jury was told yesterday.

Cahill has been granted immunity from prosecution as the key Crown witness in the trial of Allan Quidley, 37, another Air Canada cleaner, on eight charges relating to conspiracy, importing and trafficking in drugs.

The Crown alleges a number of employees, known as groomers, were involved in the drug-smuggling scheme operating out of Pearson International Airport.

The operation was halted by the seizure of $10 million worth of cocaine, hashish and marijuana.

Prosecutor Kelly Gorman earlier told the court that an anonymous tip led to the police investigation and wiretaps revealed how the drugs were hidden.

Cahill testified it was while he was cleaning inside an aircraft one day that he stumbled upon the idea.

He noticed some loose wall panelling and, looking behind it, saw space where drugs could be hidden.

He was sure Customs agents would never think to look in such a place, he testified.

Combined with the fact that Cahill was heavily in debt and had no way of paying back the money on his salary, he seized the opportunity, court heard.

"My situation was pretty desperate and to me going to prison would be no worse," Cahill testified.

With help from a fellow employee, Cahill made contact with a supplier named Muddy in Jamaica.

Muddy bought drugs and had someone else hide them aboard the aircraft.

Cahill didn't remove the drugs immediately after each flight from Jamaica, when Customs agents might be watching, but recorded the plane's tail number and waited until after it was on a domestic flight to remove the drugs.

Sometimes he boarded domestic flights after driving to Ottawa or Montreal and removed the drugs hidden inside washroom panels while in the air, not having to worry about going through Customs on arrival.

He even found a type of screwdriver that would pass through metal detectors, which he used to remove the panelling, Cahill testified.

A local connection would pick up the drugs and pay Cahill, court heard.

Muddy was unreliable and sold him bad drugs, so he moved onto to another source and was soon earning $10,000 to $20,000 a month, mainly smuggling hashish, Cahill testified.

But after that supplier ripped off Cahill on one deal, he found a local contact known as Fatman who had connections in Jamaica.

That's when his business really took off, court heard.

Even after some of his shipments mysteriously disappeared and he read in the newspaper that authorities were aware of a drug-smuggling operation, "I continued doing what I was doing anyway, only I took more precautions," Cahill testified.

The trial continues.

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I know a lot of people who live on less than that and do pretty good for themselves. I guess it's all relative.

I'm finding it hard though to believe that the guy that started it is receiving immunity when people that may have been recruited by him as helpers are the ones getting charged. I think they should throw the book at him anyway.

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Guest rattler

In one word: "Homolka".

She proved that you can get a deal for any crime if you agree to turn in someone else.

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I know a lot of people who live on less than that and do pretty good for themselves. I guess it's all relative.

I'm finding it hard though to believe that the guy that started it is receiving immunity when people that may have been recruited by him as helpers are the ones getting charged. I think they should throw the book at him anyway.

I agree with you that he should go down with the whole lot of them. There are actually 5 or 6 people involved in YYZ. The article only mentions two. I imagine the prosecution decided that in order to get as solid a case as possible against as many as possible someone had to be offered a deal. From what I know of the story Cahill knew of the contacts in Jamaica as well. I'd like to think that the Jamaican police are making some arrests as well.

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In one word: "Homolka".

She proved that you can get a deal for any crime if you agree to turn in someone else.

I guess you could call her a "Homolka" as she did have a lesbian affair while in prison but according to the news tonight "Holmoka" is in love with another guy serving 7 years for killing his girlfriend during "a fit of jealous rage".

Coming to your neighbourhood soon........

PS...Homolka/Holmoka problem could have been fixed years ago for $0.19...now it would cost $0.24 (inflation).

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Guest rattler

I guess you could call her a "Homolka" as she did have a lesbian affair while in prison but according to the news tonight "Holmoka" is in love with another guy serving 7 years for killing his girlfriend during "a fit of jealous rage".

Coming to your neighbourhood soon........

PS...Homolka/Holmoka problem could have been fixed years ago for $0.19...now it would cost $0.24 (inflation).

Kip, you are reading something into my post that was not there. The spelling from her name came from:

Homolka weeps as public gets glimpse of one of Canada's most hated convicts

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

at 20:32 on June 2, 2005, EST.

By LUANN LASALLE AND NELSON WYATT

Karla Homolka appears in a Joliette, Que. courtroom in this artist's sketch.. (CP/Francois "Atalante" Hudon)

JOLIETTE, Que. (CP) - It was a rare glimpse of Canada's most notorious female convict - Karla Homolka, weeping and wearing leg irons as the details of her horrific crimes were read out to a packed courtroom.

Also the CBC is showing the spelling as "Homolka" cbc article. I wonder which spelling is correct???

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Guest Skirt

Karla Homolka A Female Serial Killer fears that if she's freed from prison she'll be slain by vigilantes, her lawyer told The Toronto Sun last night.

With Corrections Canada poised to ask for Homolka's detention for her full 12-year sentence on grounds she'll kill again, lawyer Marc Labelle said Homolka is petrified she'll be murdered.

Labelle said Carla Homolka has not only received further threats from within the prison system, but she has also been targeted for death on chat groups his legal assistants have uncovered on the Internet.

"I haven't seen these sites myself, but I'm told there are numerous sites where threats are made that 'we'll kill you if you get out,'" Labelle said in an interview from his Montreal law office.

"What am I to make of that ... It's terrible ... it's scary."

Karla Homolka should never be able to see the light of day, ever... I'm glad she's fearfull. She's lucky to be able to feel, something Leslie Mahaffy, Kristen French, and Karla's youngest sister Tammy will never be able to do again...

So she thinks she'll be slain by some Vigilante... We as Canadians should be so lucky!!!

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Kip, you are reading something into my post that was not there. The spelling from her name came from:

Not reading anything into your post. I was merely having a "play" on one way her name appears in the media. I think I made that clear in the line with regard to the two different spellings.

Personally I don't care how her name is written because everytime I see it I can only see EVIL

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I guess you could call her a "Homolka" as she did have a lesbian affair while in prison but according to the news tonight "Holmoka" is in love with another guy serving 7 years for killing his girlfriend during "a fit of jealous rage".

Coming to your neighbourhood soon........

PS...Homolka/Holmoka problem could have been fixed years ago for $0.19...now it would cost $0.24 (inflation).

No "Naughty Word" eh? While the Canadian Media obsesses over how Holmoka has been eating the pink taco we've got repeat offenders (read: drug addicts) with upwards of a hundred criminal charges still roaming the streets. What about the sex offenders that have been deemed a "RISK" to public safety because of the danger to re-offend? Do we care about them or are they insignificant because they aren't as high-profile as Holmoka? mad.gif

Edited by CanadaEH
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Guest rattler
Not reading anything into your post. I was merely having a "play" on one way her name appears in the media. I think I made that clear in the line with regard to the two different spellings.

Personally I don't care how her name is written because everytime I see it I can only see EVIL

Sorry Kip, I misunderstood your post or at least I did not want my post to be associated with poking fun at other life styles. As far as the "evil" one, the worst thing is that she is getting out. Never should be allowed out .......

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Guest rattler

...could solve a couple of problems by throwing her in a halfway house with convicted male sex offenders.  ph34r.gif

Mitch wht you suggest is, based on her physiological profile, exactly the punishment she would hope for. A far better punishment would be to lock her into a room with no contact with any living soul, so that she could not manipulate or be manipulated by another.

Edited for spelling

Edited by rattler
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A Quebec judge imposed a series of strict restrictions on schoolgirl killer Karla Homolka upon her release from prison next month, saying the Crown's fears she is still a threat to society with a risk to reoffend are valid.

After two days of courtroom hearings--which marked Ms. Homolka's first public appearance in a decade - Quebec Judge Jean Beaulieu took only 10 minutes Friday to rule in favour of almost a dozen conditions suggested by crown prosecutors.

The restrictions mean a big loss for Ms. Homolka and her lawyer, who argued that her client should have more freedom upon release, and a victory for the Crown and the families of the victims, who argued that Ms. Homolka is still potentially dangerous and should be made to follow stringent rules.

Families expressed "enormous relief" at the ruling through lawyer Tim Danson but plan to retain a team of experts and prepare evidence to potentially renew the one-year restrictions in 2006.

""The conditions that have been imposed will go some distance to minimize the risk," he said.

Ms. Homolka showed no emotion as Judge Beaulieu read out his ruling, according to a Canadian Press report from inside the courtroom.

The ruling means she must tell authorities where she is living and who she is with after her release from prison. She must attend therapy for one year, abstain from drug use, have no contact with anyone under the age of 16 and give police 96 hours notice if she leaves plans to leave Quebec. She is also required to provide a court-ordered DNA samples.

Ms. Homolka will also be forbidden from communicating with former husband Paul Bernardo and the families of victims Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy.

And she will be prohibited from communicating with anyone who has a criminal record. This includes convicted murderer Jean-Paul Gerbet, whom she has been romantically involved with in prison.

Ontario Attorney-General Michael Bryant said the governments of Ontario and Quebec were "very, very pleased with the decision.

"Today, Canada's justice system acted, not reacted, acted to prevent harm upon Homolka's release and to protect the public upon Homolka's release," said Mr. Bryant at a press conference.

Ms. Holmolka must sign off on the conditions before she is released or she will face an additional year in jail. If she violates the conditions, she could face up to two more years in prison.

The restrictions apply for one year, and Mr. Bryant wouldn't speculate on the possibility it could be renewed in 2006.

The hearing has rekindled outrage over the case and left many again debating the so-called "deal with the devil" which led to Ms. Homolka being given a 12-year sentence in 1993 for the sex slayings of Ontario teenagers Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy and the death of her own sister Tammy Homolka.

During Friday's hearing, a psychiatrist called by the defence testified that Ms. Homolka suffers self-esteem problems but is not a psychopath and is not at a greater risk of reoffending than any other inmate now serving time.

Montreal psychiatrist Dr. Louis Morissette also portrayed Ms. Homolka as a woman who has problems with self-esteem, but he testified that she is not a psychopath and does not have an anti-social personality.

"The experts mostly agree, if she hadn't met [Paul] Bernardo, it would never have happened," he said, according to a Canadian Press report from inside the Quebec courtroom Friday.

Ms. Homolka's sentence expires on July 5.

Ms. Homolka was sentenced in 1993 after pleading guilty to two counts of manslaughter as part of an agreement with the Crown to testify against former husband Bernardo in the case.

The agreement was made before the discovery of tapes depicting the French and Mahaffy killings. Those tapes raised questions about Ms. Homolka's role in the slayings and her claim that abuse by Mr. Bernardo led to her participation.

But Tim Danson, the lawyer representing the French and Mahaffy families, balked Friday at Dr. Morissette's assessment of Ms. Homolka, arguing that she put her relationship with Mr. Bernardo ahead of the lives of the two slain schoolgirls or that of her own sister.

"Now, if that doesn't strike you as being alarming," he told reporters outside the courthouse during a break in the hearing.

"There are a lot of people in this world who have low self-esteem. They don't go out and murder their sisters and murder other people."

He also said the assessment fails to take into the brutal nature of the crimes, which shocked the nation.

"It's not just that she goes out because of low self-esteem and commits murders, but that she does it in a manner, with Paul Bernardo, that is sadistic and brutal," he said.

He added that the psychiatrist also conceded that he felt Ms. Homolka needs further treatment.

"It seems to me that her own witness was conceding that that kind of court order would be helpful for Karla Homolka and to protect the public interest," he said.

On Thursday, Ms. Homolka's lawyer unsuccessfully tried to have the hearing dismissed, contending that it was an abuse of power and a violation of Ms. Homolka's rights.

In her closing arguments, Ms. Homolka's lawyer argued that her client's rights would be violated if restrictions were placed on her freedom.

"She's conscious of the fact that she does everything possible to never find herself in the situation she was in," said Sylvie Bordelais, adding that Canadians should learn to understand she has changed and is no longer dangerous.

During the first day of the hearing, the court heard from Constable Brian Noble of the Niagara Regional Police, who detailed the circumstances of the killings and cited correctional records and psychiatric reports to argue that Ms. Homolka continues to pose a threat to society.

Ms. Homolka's tearful response to Constable Noble's description of the killings sparked rage from Mr. Danson, lawyer for the French and Mahaffy families, who deemed it "a little bit late."

Court also heard that corrections officials, who considered Ms. Homolka a conformist who followed the rules while incarcerated, also found a naked photo of convicted killer Mr. Gerbet, with whom Ms. Homolka has struck up a relationship.

Mr. Danson called that revelation especially telling.

"This is very, very significant," he said. "Even those psychiatrists who have given the opinion that Karla Homolka doesn't represent a threat public safety have conceded that that's conditional on the fact that she not associated with these kinds of people.

"The very fact that she's doing precisely that means all bets are off."

However, Dr. Morissette testified that Ms. Homolka - who was also involved with a female prisoner earlier in her incarceration - knows that she cannot have a relationship with Mr. Gerbet because he will be deported to his native France when he is released. Mr. Gerbet will be eligible for parole in 2008.

He also said he was aware the two had exchanged letters but could not say whether they were continuing to write.

"These are things that must be discussed," Dr. Morissette said. "She doesn't hide it. She discusses it."

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Guest rattler

"The experts mostly agree, if she hadn't met [Paul] Bernardo, it would never have happened," he said, according to a Canadian Press report from inside the Quebec courtroom Friday.

And if Atilla the hun had not met?? he would have grown up to be a very nice guy......

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"Today, Canada's justice system acted, not reacted, acted to prevent harm upon Homolka's release and to protect the public upon Homolka's release," said Mr. Bryant at a press conference.

"Naughty Word" hypocrits.

A Quebec judge imposed a series of strict restrictions on schoolgirl killer Karla Homolka upon her release from prison next month, saying the Crown's fears she is still a threat to society with a risk to reoffend are valid.

""The conditions that have been imposed will go some distance to minimize the risk," he said.

The restrictions apply for one year, and Mr. Bryant wouldn't speculate on the possibility it could be renewed in 2006.

During the first day of the hearing, the court heard from Constable Brian Noble of the Niagara Regional Police, who detailed the circumstances of the killings and cited correctional records and psychiatric reports to argue that Ms. Homolka continues to pose a threat to society.

angry[1].gif

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  • 17 years later...
17 minutes ago, Guest Neve said:

Very late to this story. But does anyone know what happened to Jeff clean face cahill

AIR CANADA EMPLOYEE KEY PLAYER IN SMUGGLING RING

Drugs Hidden On Planes

A Mississauga man who used his job at Air Canada to become a major player in an international smuggling ring has been found guilty of trafficking and importing drugs.

The 12 jurors deliberated for nearly two days before finding 37-year-old Allan Quidley guilty on five of seven criminal charges he was facing in connection with a smuggling ring that operated in 1999 and 2000.

He was a key player in a ring that smuggled millions of dollars of illegal narcotics through Pearson International Airport, according to prosecutors.

Quidley was convicted of conspiracy to import cocaine and hashish, trafficking and importing cocaine and importing hashish.

The jury acquitted Quidley on one count of importing hashish, while jury members were hung on a charge of importing cocaine.

Quidley will remain in custody until he is sentenced Aug.  12 in Brampton court.

Throughout the month-long trial that wrapped up last week, Federal Crown Prosecutor Kelly Gorman said Quidley was a key player in a drug smuggling operation that saw airplane "groomers" remove drugs had been hidden in the walls and ceilings of planes arriving in Mississauga from Montego Bay and Kingston, Jamaica in 1999 and 2000.

In the airport industry, an employee who boards and cleans planes between flights is known as a groomer.

Quidley was among more than a dozen people charged in November of 2000.

Gorman told jurors during Quidley's trial the scheme was "ingenious but simple," and also involved drug couriers from Jamaica.

The mules boarded flights in Kingston and Montego Bay carrying large quantities of drugs and hid them during the flight in ceiling and wall panels of aircraft washrooms.

The drugs were later retrieved by groomers, Gorman said.

An anonymous tip led to a joint investigation by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada Customs officers, who seized $10 million worth of drugs, the prosecutor said.

The key prosecution witness was Jeff Cahill, a former Air Canada cleaner who took part in the drug smuggling.

He was granted immunity in return for testifying against Quidley.

Cahill said the operation was earning him $50,000 a month. 

I am sure he was  removed from AC, and perhaps  employed elsewhere 

 

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