Marshall

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Everything posted by Marshall

  1. Perhaps but when it comes to security, it appears that it is working and so far "Joe **bleep**" has not been able to breach it. Perhaps they would never have tried but...... I for one don't want to find out the "hard" way.
  2. Strange, the coupon is good in BC and Alberta. According to McDonalds, the same deal (2 can dine is 11.78) in Toronto. At your local the big mac meal is quoted at 7.50 (regular rate, no discount). that is why the $14.00 quote seems to be out of the norm. By the by when the Big mac, chips and a drink was under $1.00, I was making 300.00 a month. . https://www.zomato.com/toronto/mcdonalds-downtown-yonge/menu#tabtop Skip the dishes for the Mcdonalds in Toronto is quoting 9.75 for the big Mac meal deal. https://www.skipthedishes.com/mcdonalds-skymark-avenue
  3. US Air Force nears battle over next B-52 engine By: Valerie Insinna   50 minutes ago AddThis Sharing Buttons Share to Facebook Facebook Share to Twitter Twitter Share to Email Email Share to More AddThis <img src="https://www.armytimes.com/resizer/WOYf7I8fzDx6IpwyuwWnP1vErBY=/1200x0/filters:quality(100)/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-mco.s3.amazonaws.com/public/VKMRMJ5DUBCGVI2SADPA62URZM.jpg" alt=""/> Senior Airman Josh Serafin monitors the ignition of B-52H Stratofortress engines at Minot Air Force Base, N.D. Each B-52 uses eight TF33 engines to fly. (Senior Airman J.T. Armstrong/U.S. Air Force) BARKSDALE AIR FORCE BASE, La., and WASHINGTON — After several months of delays, the U.S. Air Force is hoping to release a request for proposals for new B-52 bomber engines by the end of 2019, once the service gets the chance to solidify its solicitation and answer congressional concerns. But at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana, B-52 maintainers are hungry for new motors that will hopefully lessen the time it takes to diagnose and fix engine problems. “If I was to prioritize the systems from a maintainer’s point of view, in my personal opinion — not the Air Force’s obviously — but [replacing] the engines first and foremost” would have the most positive impact on the maintenance community, said Lt. Col. Tiffany Arnold, 2nd Maintenance Squadron commander. Arnold spoke with journalist and Defense News contributor Jeff Bolton during a visit to Barksdale AFB. Each B-52 uses eight TF33 engines to fly, which means maintainers spend a lot of time ensuring each engine functions properly. And when more than one engine needs repairs, that entails more work for the personnel that are already performing multiple assessments, Arnold said. Click here for more from the special report on the U.S. nuclear enterprise. The Air Force believes it can reduce fuel burn and cut down the number of hours needed to maintain the B-52 by swapping the TF33s with eight new, off-the-shelf engines. It’s a discussion that’s been going on for more than 30 years, said Alan Williams, deputy B-52 program element monitor with Air Force Global Strike Command. “The B-52 was going to be retired in 1996, and then the date slid to 2000, then it slid to 2003, then it went finally to 2040 and now it’s 2050,” he said in an August interview. “The extended life has finally given us the green light for upgrades we’ve been looking at for 20 or 30 years but could never get funded.”
  4. 1> Here are some of the upgrades coming to the US Air Force’s oldest bomber ‎Today, ‎September ‎15, ‎2019, ‏‎1 hour ago | Valerie Insinna New radar, new weapons, new data links. Same old plane. Decades late, the B-52 is getting a new nuclear weapon ‎Today, ‎September ‎15, ‎2019, ‏‎3 hours ago | Aaron Mehta, Jeff Martin To keep the B-52 bomber relevant for its nuclear mission, the U.S. Air Force is preparing to spend billions of dollars to develop a new air-launched cruise missile.
  5. Curious as to where you pay 14.00 for a big mac combo (perhaps in Trudeau land?) Here in Cattle country.
  6. I deleted some of my comments re the campaign aircraft as my premise was not correct.
  7. Nicotine was on it's way out and then: Vaping deaths: 'A new generation of nicotine addicts' Doctors in the US are warning people not to use e-cigarettes as they investigate a number of deaths linked to vaping. But health experts also say there's a long-term addiction crisis because so many American teenagers are already hooked on nicotine. Produced by the BBC's Chelsea Bailey, Roderick Macleod, Franz Strasser and Caché McClay https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-canada-49670319/vaping-deaths-a-new-generation-of-nicotine-addicts
  8. A hidden price of going to "Green Energy" Climate change: Electrical industry's 'dirty secret' boosts warming By Matt McGrath Environment correspondentImage copyright Getty Images Image caption The expansion of electrical grid connections has increased use of SF6 It's the most powerful greenhouse gas known to humanity, and emissions have risen rapidly in recent years, the BBC has learned. Sulphur hexafluoride, or SF6, is widely used in the electrical industry to prevent short circuits and accidents. But leaks of the little-known gas in the UK and the rest of the EU in 2017 were the equivalent of putting an extra 1.3 million cars on the road. Levels are rising as an unintended consequence of the green energy boom. China confirmed as source of rise in CFCs Cheap and non-flammable, SF6 is a colourless, odourless, synthetic gas. It makes a hugely effective insulating material for medium and high-voltage electrical installations. It is widely used across the industry, from large power stations to wind turbines to electrical sub-stations in towns and cities. It prevents electrical accidents and fires. However, the significant downside to using the gas is that it has the highest global warming potential of any known substance. It is 23,500 times more warming than carbon dioxide (CO2).Just one kilogram of SF6 warms the Earth to the same extent as 24 people flying London to New York return. It also persists in the atmosphere for a long time, warming the Earth for at least 1,000 years. So why are we using more of this powerful warming gas? The way we make electricity around the world is changing rapidly. Where once large coal-fired power stations brought energy to millions, the drive to combat climate change means they are now being replaced by mixed sources of power including wind, solar and gas. This has resulted in many more connections to the electricity grid, and a rise in the number of electrical switches and circuit breakers that are needed to prevent serious accidents. Collectively, these safety devices are called switchgear. The vast majority use SF6 gas to quench arcs and stop short circuits. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Gas-insulated, high-voltage switchgear almost always uses SF6 "As renewable projects are getting bigger and bigger, we have had to use it within wind turbines specifically," said Costa Pirgousis, an engineer with Scottish Power Renewables on its new East Anglia wind farm, which doesn't use SF6 in turbines. "As we are putting in more and more turbines, we need more and more switchgear and, as a result, more SF6 is being introduced into big turbines off shore. "It's been proven for years and we know how it works, and as a result it is very reliable and very low maintenance for us offshore." How do we know that SF6 is increasing? Across the entire UK network of power lines and substations, there are around one million kilograms of SF6 installed. A study from the University of Cardiff found that across all transmission and distribution networks, the amount used was increasing by 30-40 tonnes per year. This rise was also reflected across Europe with total emissions from the 28 member states in 2017 equivalent to 6.73 million tonnes of CO2. That's the same as the emissions from 1.3 million extra cars on the road for a year. Researchers at the University of Bristol who monitor concentrations of warming gases in the atmosphere say they have seen significant rises in the last 20 years. "We make measurements of SF6 in the background atmosphere," said Dr Matt Rigby, reader in atmospheric chemistry at Bristol. "What we've seen is that the levels have increased substantially, and we've seen almost a doubling of the atmospheric concentration in the last two decades." How does SF6 get into the atmosphere? The most important means by which SF6 gets into the atmosphere is from leaks in the electricity industry. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Electrical switchgear the world over often uses SF6 to prevent fires Electrical company Eaton, which manufactures switchgear without SF6, says its research indicates that for the full life-cycle of the product, leaks could be as high as 15% - much higher than many other estimates. Louis Shaffer, electrical business manager at Eaton, said: "The newer gear has very low leak rates but the key question is do you have newer gear? "We looked at all equipment and looked at the average of all those leak rates, and we didn't see people taking into account the filling of the gas. Plus, we looked at how you recycle it and return it and also included the catastrophic leaks." How damaging to the climate is this gas? Concentrations in the atmosphere are very small right now, just a fraction of the amount of CO2 in the air. However, the global installed base of SF6 is expected to grow by 75% by 2030. Another concern is that SF6 is a synthetic gas and isn't absorbed or destroyed naturally. It will all have to be replaced and destroyed to limit the impact on the climate. Developed countries are expected to report every year to the UN on how much SF6 they use, but developing countries do not face any restrictions on use. Right now, scientists are detecting concentrations in the atmosphere that are 10 times the amount declared by countries in their reports. Scientists say this is not all coming from countries like India, China and South Korea. One study found that the methods used to calculate emissions in richer countries "severely under-reported" emissions over the past two decades. Why hasn't this been banned? SF6 comes under a group of human-produced substances known as F-gases. The European Commission tried to prohibit a number of these environmentally harmful substances, including gases in refrigeration and air conditioning, back in 2014. But they faced strong opposition from industries across Europe. "In the end, the electrical industry lobby was too strong and we had to give in to them," said Dutch Green MEP Bas Eickhout, who was responsible for the attempt to regulate F-gases. "The electric sector was very strong in arguing that if you want an energy transition, and you have to shift more to electricity, you will need more electric devices. And then you also will need more SF6. "They used the argument that otherwise the energy transition would be slowed down." What do regulator and electrical companies say about the gas? Everyone is trying to reduce their dependence on the gas, as it is universally recognised as harmful to the climate. In the UK, energy regulator Ofgem says it is working with utilities to try to limit leaks of the gas. "We are using a range of tools to make sure that companies limit their use of SF6, a potent greenhouse gas, where this is in the interest of energy consumers," an Ofgem spokesperson told BBC News. "This includes funding innovation trials and rewarding companies to research and find alternatives, setting emissions targets, rewarding companies that beat those targets, and penalising those that miss them." Are there alternatives - and are they very expensive? The question of alternatives to SF6 has been contentious over recent years. For high-voltage applications, experts say there are very few solutions that have been rigorously tested. "There is no real alternative that is proven," said Prof Manu Haddad from the school of engineering at Cardiff University. "There are some that are being proposed now but to prove their operation over a long period of time is a risk that many companies don't want to take." However, for medium voltage operations there are several tried-and-tested materials. Some in the industry say that the conservative nature of the electrical industry is the key reason that few want to change to a less harmful alternative. "I will tell you, everyone in this industry knows you can do this; there is not a technical reason not to do it," said Louis Shaffer from Eaton. "It's not really economic; it's more a question that change takes effort and if you don't have to, you won't do it." Some companies are feeling the winds of change Sitting in the North Sea some 43km from the Suffolk coast, Scottish Power Renewables has installed one of world's biggest wind farms where the turbines will be free of SF6 gas. East Anglia One will see 102 of these towering generators erected, with the capacity to produce up to 714MW (megawatts) of power by 2020, enough to supply half a million homes. Image copyright ALAN O'NEILL Image caption The turbines at East Anglia One are taller than the Elizabeth Tower at the Houses of Parliament which houses Big Ben Previously, an installation like this would have used switchgear supplied with SF6, to prevent the electrical accidents that can lead to fires. Each turbine would normally have contained around 5kg of SF6, which, if it leaked into the atmosphere, would add the equivalent of around 117 tonnes of carbon dioxide. This is roughly the same as the annual emissions from 25 cars. "In this case we are using a combination of clean air and vacuum technology within the turbine. It allows us to still have a very efficient, reliable, high-voltage network but to also be environmentally friendly," said Costa Pirgousis from Scottish Power Renewables. "Once there are viable alternatives on the market, there is no reason not to use them. In this case, we've got a viable alternative and that's why we are using it." But even for companies that are trying to limit the use of SF6, there are still limitations. At the heart of East Anglia One sits a giant offshore substation to which all 102 turbines will connect. It still uses significant quantities of the highly warming gas. What happens next ? The EU will review the use of SF6 next year and will examine whether alternatives are available. However, even the most optimistic experts don't think that any ban is likely to be put in place before 2025.
  9. Hired in 2015: RCMP intel director charged in major case was top adviser to former force head: sources By Amanda Connolly, Mercedes Stephenson, Stewart Bell, Sam Cooper and Rachel Browne Global News The RCMP has arrested and charged a high-level official with the force in a major national security case. Cameron Ortis faces seven charges dating back to 2015 under both the Criminal Code and the Security of Information Act, and Global News has learned the RCMP believe he stole “large quantities of information, which could compromise an untold number of investigations.” Other sources referred to the case as “serious spy s–t.” Other sources referred to the case as “serious spy s–t.” Story continues below READ MORE: Canadian infrastructure sector made aware of potential effects of ‘insider’ cyberthreats A statement from the RCMP said the charges “stem from activities alleged to have occurred during his tenure as an RCMP employee.” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was asked by reporters on the Liberal campaign on Friday whether he could reassure Canadians that the national interest had not been compromised and initially walked away from reporters. He later briefly addressed the matter, saying he was “of course made aware” of the case but could not comment. WATCH BELOW: Trudeau says he was “of course made aware” of the arrest of a senior RCMP official, but declined further comment Sources with knowledge of national security investigations described Ortis as former RCMP Comm. Bob Paulson’s most elite adviser on issues related to national security and sensitive investigations. They added he was likely the only civilian to ever achieve the position of director general of intelligence. That role gave him control over RCMP counter-intelligence operations. But a source with knowledge of national security investigations said that the elevation of Ortis as a top adviser to Paulson not only raised eye-brows but for some there was even concern. The expectation is that such a high-level director of intelligence should have some operational experience a source said, but Ortis was viewed as purely academic. With the stunning news of the investigations against Ortis — and considering his influence in Canada’s national security investigations – an emerging question that could be raised is whether Ortis could have discouraged investigations against certain nations or targets, a source said. Ortis is described as an Ottawa intellectual and an academic that was seen as arrogant by some in Canada’s national security establishment. Global News’ early source information indicates that Ortis’ expertise in computers and cyberspace, the level of sensitive high-tech information he would have access to as a longtime government adviser, as well as his connections to East Asia and China, are some of the areas that could have concerned this multi-pronged national security information. As a civilian member of the RCMP’s strategic intelligence unit, Ortis had a lynchpin role that gave him unparalleled access to operation intelligence, according to a source. At times, he worked extensively with FINTRAC, and once focused on Somalia, one of the countries that has attracted Canadian extremists to fight in the terrorist group Al-Shabab, the source said. The source described him as professional and competent. WATCH BELOW: Justin Trudeau addresses whether China should be considered a national security threat Ortis is charged with: Section 14(1) of the Security of Information Act Section 22(1)(b) of the Security of Information Act Section 22(1)(e) of the Security of Information Act Section 122 of the Criminal Code Section 342.1(1) of the Criminal Code Those charges relate specifically with unauthorized leaking of sensitive operational information and breach of trust, as well as unauthorized use of a computer. The other counts refer to “obtaining, retaining or gaining access” to information and possessing a device “useful for concealing the content of information or surreptitiously communicating, obtaining or retaining information.” Two of the charges are based on a section of the Security of Information Act that relates to preparatory acts towards “communications to a foreign entity.” He faces up to 33 years imprisonment if convicted. Ortis appeared briefly in the Ottawa courthouse on Friday where the Crown announced it was in fact laying seven charges against him. It’s not clear at this time what the additional charges are. John MacFarlane with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada alleged in court that the Crown suspected Ortis of having “obtained, stored, processed sensitive information we believe with the intent to communicate it to people that he shouldn’t be communicating it to.” The court adjourned and is set to resume on Sept. 20 at 9:30 AM after Ortis has had time to obtain a lawyer. Potentially ‘one of the worst cases of espionage’: expert Sources tell Global News the investigation was extensive and that Ortis was arrested on Thursday in Ottawa. He holds a Ph.D from the University of British Columbia focusing on cybersecurity in East Asia and is listed on his LinkedIn profile as speaking Mandarin and having worked as an adviser to the Government of Canada for 12 years. Global News reached out to CSIS asking if the spy agency had been involved in the investigation but was referred to the RCMP. Heather Bradley, director of communications for the Speaker’s office with the House of Commons, also referred matters to the RCMP when asked whether any further assessments of administration infrastructure security or risks was ongoing. Stephanie Carvin, a national security expert and assistant professor at Carleton University, said “If this person succeeded, this could potentially be one of the worst cases of espionage that we’ve ever seen in Canada,” she said. “If this was a four-year investigation, I would be surprised if this person had only tried once and failed once. The concern is that this may have been going on for some time but we don’t see that reflected in the charges yet.” The arrest is the latest in Canada stemming from what it is sometimes called the insider threat. In 2011, a navy intelligence officer, Jeffrey Delisle, was caught selling secrets to the Russian embassy in Ottawa. He was sentenced to 20 years but has already been paroled. The RCMP arrested Quin Quentin Huang in 2013 for allegedly trying to pass secrets about Canadian patrol ships to the Chinese government. He worked at Lloyd’s Register Canada, which was subcontracted by Irving Shipbuilding to work on the design phase of Canada’s Arctic patrol vessels. The case has not yet gone to trial.
  10. Yet airlines are cutting back their planned skeds based on the absence of their MAX aircraft. Some are even renting uplift during the same time as the election campaign. Mind you I have happy that the Conservatives are using AC. https://www.otc-cta.gc.ca/node/568805
  11. It is a puzzler, maybe it had something to do with the track that the locks are clipped to? Military pallets are normally thicker than the civilian ones (weight bearing needs) but based on the ones we saw coming back from Nam on the swing tail brits (CL-44D4} from HKG to YVR, they locked into normal commercial aircraft with no problems. https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/defense/2018-12-17/mcconnell-prepares-first-air-force-kc-46
  12. US Air Force restricts KC-46 from carrying cargo and passengers By: Valerie Insinna   1 day ago https://www.defensenews.com/breaking-news/2019/09/11/air-force-restricts-kc-46-from-carrying-cargo-and-personnel/ <img src="https://www.armytimes.com/resizer/ZKEK6L3R1IxDVmq66OI5--bQbyg=/1200x0/filters:quality(100)/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-mco.s3.amazonaws.com/public/PZQEAC332JD6ZBFBJXPDWX6J7Y.jpg" alt=""/> The KC-46 has added another critical deficiency to the list, and it's the most serious problem yet. (Senior Airman Christian Conrad/U.S. Air Force) WASHINGTON — In a move that could have major impacts on the already-delayed tanker program, the U.S. Air Force has indefinitely barred the KC-46 from carrying cargo and passengers, Defense News has learned. The decision was made after an incident occurred where the cargo locks on the bottom of the floor of the aircraft became unlocked during a recent flight, creating concerns that airmen could potentially be hurt or even killed by heavy equipment that suddenly bursts free during a flight. “As a result of this discovery, the Air Force has submitted a Category 1 deficiency report and is working with Boeing to identify a solution,” Air Force Mobility Command spokesman Col. Damien Pickart said in a statement. The service uses the term Category 1 to describe serious technical issues that could endanger the aircrew and aircraft or have other major effects. “Until we find a viable solution with Boeing to remedy this problem, we can’t jeopardize the safety of our aircrew and this aircraft,” he said. Boeing delivers first KC-46, but fixes to technical problems still years away Boeing could miss out on $1.5 billion if the maximum withholding is applied to all 52 tankers on contract. By: Valerie Insinna The problem was discovered during a recent overseas operational test and evaluation flight, when KC-46 aircrew noticed that numerous cargo restraint devices had come unlocked over the course of the multiple legs of the trip. “Prior to departing for each of these missions, aircrew fully installed, locked and thoroughly inspected each restraint, and performed routine inspections of the restraints in flight,” Pickart said. “Despite these safety measures, the unlocking of cargo floor restraints occurred during flight, although no cargo or equipment moved and there was no specific risk to the aircraft or crew.” A source with knowledge of the issue told Defense News that if all restraints on a particular pallet had become unlocked, it would be able to roll freely throughout the cabin. If all cargo became unlatched, it could pose a safety risk to aircrew or even unbalance the aircraft — making the plane “difficult, if not impossible” to control. While this problem has only been observed on one KC-46, the Air Force does not have enough information to rule out other aircraft having a similar defect. The problem also poses a danger to the tanker’s operational test schedule, Pickart said. The program was set to start initial operational test and evaluation this fall, with pre-IOT&E activities already initiated. “This is a multi-mission aircraft, it’s for carrying cargo and passengers, it’s for refueling and also the aeromedical evacuation mission,” he said. “If you can’t carry cargo pallets and patient litters, a significant amount of your core missions cannot be properly tested.” In a statement, KC-46 manufacturer Boeing acknowledged that it had been notified of the new issue. “The company and the Air Force are cooperatively analyzing the locks to determine a root cause,” Boeing stated. “The safety of KC-46 aircraft and crew is our top priority. Once a cause has been identified, the tanker team will implement any required actions as quickly as possible.” But the problem could be bad news for Boeing’s bottom line. The company is locked into a fixed-price contract for where it is responsible for paying for any expenses beyond the initial $4.9 billion award for development of the aircraft. So far, the company has paid more than $3.5 billion of its own money to fund corrections to ongoing technical issues. Air Force finds new KC-46 deficiencies, jeopardizing planned delivery date The Boeing-made tanker has encountered yet another set of issues. By: Valerie Insinna The latest Cat-1 deficiency brings the total up to four: The tanker’s remote vision system or RVS — the camera system that allows KC-46 boom operators to steer the boom into a receiver aircraft without having to look out a window and use visual cues — provides imagery in certain lighting conditions that appears warped or misleading. Boeing has agreed to pay for potentially extensive hardware and software fixes, but the Air Force believes it will be three or four years until the system is fully functional. The Air Force has recorded instances of the boom scraping against the airframe of receiver aircraft. Boeing and the Air Force believe this problem is a symptom of the RVS’s acuity problems and will be eliminated once the camera system is fixed. Boeing must redesign the boom to accommodate the A-10, which currently does not generate the thrust necessary to push into the boom for refueling. This problem is a requirements change by the Air Force, which approved Boeing’s design in 2016. Last month, Boeing received a $55.5 million contract to begin work on the new boom actuator. While the KC-46 program has clocked several key milestones this year, it has also hit some publicly embarrassing stumbles. After several years of delays, the Air Force finally signed off on the acceptance of the first tanker. However, due to the list of technical problems, Boeing was forced to accept an agreement where the service could withhold up to $28 million per aircraft upon delivery. About $360 million has been withheld so far, Defense One reported in July. The Air Force plans to buy 179 KC-46s over the life of the program, and 52 are currently on contract. So far, Boeing has delivered 18 tankers to McConnell Air Force Base, Kan.; Altus Air Force Base, Okla; and Pease Air National Guard Base, N.H. But deliveries were interrupted earlier this year by the discovery of foreign object debris in multiple planes. The Air Force suspended KC-46 flights at Boeing’s production line in Everett, Wash., this February after finding debris. Then it paused all tanker deliveries in March as the service investigated the extent of the problem. The service began accepting tankers again later that month, only for deliveries to stop — and restart — in April due to similar problems. Will Roper, the service’s acquisition executive, told reporters at the Paris Air Show this July that the service expects to find foreign object debris in KC-46s moving through the line, and it may be months before planes are reliably clean. “As those airplanes flow forward down the line, we think it’s going to take some time for the new quality assurance inspection processes to start early enough so that airplanes will flow that are FOD-free,” he said, according to Defense One. “It’s not the way we want to get airplanes into the Air Force, but it’s what we’re going to have to do in the meantime.” This story was corrected on Sept. 12 at 1:50 p.m. EST to include Pease Air National Guard Base.
  13. Center Of Gravity Concerns Lead To Lufthansa Pulling Last Economy Row On A320neo https://simpleflying.com/lufthansa-a320-cog-economy/ German flag carrier Lufthansa has stopped selling the last row of seats in its Airbus A320neos due to concerns over the aircraft’s center-of-gravity limitations. This move comes after Lufthansa pilots were reportedly given an internal memo that suggested blocking off the last row of seats. This is seen as a makeshift measure following an airworthiness directive from EASA, according to Air Transport World. EASA finds center of gravity issues on the A320neo Following concerns regarding the center of gravity issues with the A321neo, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has uncovered a similar problem with the A320neo. After a series of tests, the A320neo is susceptible to angle-of-attack protection weakness. Under certain conditions and maneuvers, the aircraft’s aileron, elevator, and the elevator and aileron computer (ELAC) software compensator showed a defect. For the problem to occur two things must first happen: The A320neo must be set up for landing with a center of gravity near its limit at the rear of the aircraft. It then takes a sudden maneuver like an aborted landing to cause the nose of the aircraft to rear up more than it normally would in a go-around situation. Normally under these conditions, ELAC would automatically correct the angle of attack to compensate, but it does not. Meanwhile, the pilot of the A320neo can correct the angle of rotation and reduce the pitch angle without any problems. At no time on the A320neo does the computer override the actions of the pilot flying the plane. This is in direct contrast to the Boeing 737 MAX and its MCAS anti-stall prevention system that inhibits a pilot’s intervention during an excessive pitch-up situation. Airbus has updated the A320neo flight manual This new finding comes on the back of a similar excessive pitch anomaly that occurs under the same circumstances with the A321neo. The Airworthiness Directive (AD), issued by the EASA and published by HMGaerospace reads: “Reduced efficiency of the A320neo AOA protection under certain flight conditions, and in combination with specific command maneuvers from the flight crew, could lead to excessive pitch attitudes, possibly increasing cockpit workload conditions. “This potentially unsafe condition, although never encountered during operations, was discovered during analysis and laboratory testing of the A320neo flight control laws.” Airbus has contacted airlines flying the A320neo and has updated the aircraft’s flight manual with revisions to the center-of-gravity. The manufacturer has also provided new load recommendations. According to Aviation Week, senior executives at Lufthansa say the center of gravity issue only relates to A320neos and A321neos that have been fitted out with Space Flex cabins. What are Space Flex cabins? Designed to accommodate passengers with reduced mobility aboard single-aisle Airbus aircraft the Space-Flex is a new galley and toilet set-up that takes advantage of previously unused space. German flag carrier Lufthansa has stopped selling the last row of seats in its Airbus A320neos due to concerns over the aircraft’s center-of-gravity limitations. Lufthansa has stopped passengers from sitting in the last row. Photo: Airbus This move comes after Lufthansa pilots were reportedly given an internal memo that suggested blocking off the last row of seats. This is seen as a makeshift measure following an airworthiness directive from EASA, according to Air Transport World. EASA finds center of gravity issues on the A320neo Following concerns regarding the center of gravity issues with the A321neo, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has uncovered a similar problem with the A320neo. After a series of tests, the A320neo is susceptible to angle-of-attack protection weakness. Under certain conditions and maneuvers, the aircraft’s aileron, elevator, and the elevator and aileron computer (ELAC) software compensator showed a defect. Featured Video: Lufthansa Won't Retire Their 747's Anytime Soon - Here's Why For the problem to occur two things must first happen: The A320neo must be set up for landing with a center of gravity near its limit at the rear of the aircraft. It then takes a sudden maneuver like an aborted landing to cause the nose of the aircraft to rear up more than it normally would in a go-around situation. The issue would only occur in a go-around situation. Photo: TJDarmstadt via Flickr Normally under these conditions, ELAC would automatically correct the angle of attack to compensate, but it does not. Meanwhile, the pilot of the A320neo can correct the angle of rotation and reduce the pitch angle without any problems. At no time on the A320neo does the computer override the actions of the pilot flying the plane. This is in direct contrast to the Boeing 737 MAX and its MCAS anti-stall prevention system that inhibits a pilot’s intervention during an excessive pitch-up situation. Airbus has updated the A320neo flight manual This new finding comes on the back of a similar excessive pitch anomaly that occurs under the same circumstances with the A321neo. A380 News: Air France Announces A380 Retirement Plans Airbus has updated the aircraft’s flight manual. Photo: Lufthansa The Airworthiness Directive (AD), issued by the EASA and published by HMGaerospace reads: “Reduced efficiency of the A320neo AOA protection under certain flight conditions, and in combination with specific command maneuvers from the flight crew, could lead to excessive pitch attitudes, possibly increasing cockpit workload conditions. “This potentially unsafe condition, although never encountered during operations, was discovered during analysis and laboratory testing of the A320neo flight control laws.” Airbus has contacted airlines flying the A320neo and has updated the aircraft’s flight manual with revisions to the center-of-gravity. The manufacturer has also provided new load recommendations. According to Aviation Week, senior executives at Lufthansa say the center of gravity issue only relates to A320neos and A321neos that have been fitted out with Space Flex cabins. A380 News: Air France Announces A380 Retirement Plans What are Space Flex cabins? Designed to accommodate passengers with reduced mobility aboard single-aisle Airbus aircraft the Space-Flex is a new galley and toilet set-up that takes advantage of previously unused space. The new configuration can also accommodate six more seats or provide additional space for passenger comfort. With enough room for airlines to customize their galleys to their meal and drink requirements, the real innovation can be found in the lavatories. Now passengers in wheelchairs have enough room to maneuver and can transfer from their chair to a sideways positioned toilet. With EASA not issuing a critical directive, airlines are allowed to still fly the A320neo and are taking steps to temporarily address the problem until Airbus comes up with a solution.
  14. the real irony is this, both AC and AT have revised their schedules due to the 737Max issue but both have found room to rent out aircraft to the Conservatives and the Liberals. I wonder how many sked flights may have been flown instead? AC backed their bet up with AT I guess had some spare aircraft and even managed to sub in one for the plane damaged in YYJ.
  15. More cancellations due to grounding of the MAX https://blog.westjet.com/westjet-updates-to-max-schedule/?sm_cid=social:ws-world:737max:twitter
  16. It is also really amazing how impatient people are who walk into Emergency for treatment. Some don't understand that it is not when you arrive that counts, it is how your need is rated (triage).
  17. Beijing’s Daxing International Airport looks set to open ahead of schedule, as Chinese aviation authorities are expected to award the airport its operating licence https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/daxing-to-be-operational-from-15-september-460778/?cmpid=NLC|FGFG|FGABN-2019-0912-GLOB|news&sfid=70120000000taAf It will be interesting to see who operates from the new airport as well of course how connections will be handled to / from the current airport.
  18. Perhaps a portent for how the election will go?
  19. It's an AirCanada 319. https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/what-we-know-about-the-leaders-planes-chartered-for-the-election-campaign-1.4588517 Trudeau is using a 737-800 from Air Transat
  20. and more recently, not personally involved but this underscores the risks associated with being a Firefighter Calgary Fire Department honours 6 fallen firefighters during annual ceremony Rain fell on a crowd of several hundred people at Calgary City Hall Tuesday as the Calgary Fire Department's pipe band played during an annual memorial service. As part of the memorial, six names were added to the list of the department's fallen firefighters this year, which now numbers 53. Fifty-three firefighters' names are now displayed on the memorial https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-fire-department-memorial-ceremony-mike-henson-1.5278618?cmp=rss
  21. WILD ALLEGATIONS ABOUT INQUIRY ANGER KENNEY Calgary Herald 11 Sep 2019 DON BRAID Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald dbraid@postmedia.com Twitter: @Donbraid Facebook: Don Braid Politics VINCENT MCDERMOTT Premier Jason Kenney on Tuesday said Amnesty International backs foreign billionaires trying to block Alberta’s industry. Premier Jason Kenney’s opponents just proved his point. The day after the public inquiry into anti-oilsands funding went public, Amnesty International sent a personal letter to Kenney blasting the probe as an attack on “human rights defenders — particularly Indigenous, women, and environmental human rights defenders — exposing them to intimidation and threats, including threats of violence.” Something like this was bound to happen; I’d even warned in a column that a formal inquiry with full court powers would invite allegations of abuse. But this attack? It’s absurd. And it proves Kenney’s point that there is no restraint in the opposition to the oil and gas industry. That being obvious, the UCP theory goes, there’s nothing to be gained by caving or cowering before these people. The only option is to fight back. That’s why he established the inquiry in the first place. Much as many Albertans prefer compromise and conciliation, it gets harder to disagree with Kenney’s tough strategy in the face of such wild, nonsensical charges. First, how does the inquiry into foreign funding somehow threaten not just human rights and women, but Indigenous people in particular? All Kenney has said, repeatedly, is that he’ll fund legal actions by Indigenous advocates of oil and gas projects and pipelines, just as the other side funds Indigenous opponents. There’s no cause about which Kenney is more passionate than First Nations prosperity. Besides funding for legal action, the government promises a First Nations economic development agency. The premier constantly says it’s time for First Nations to share fully in economic benefits. The problem for Amnesty International, obviously, is not human rights or Indigenous poverty, but climate change. Human rights are available to those fighting the “energy agenda.” Those who defend responsible energy development are by definition the enemies of human rights. The secretary general of Amnesty International, Alex Neve, demands that Kenney ensure there is no “harassment, surveillance or criminalization of human rights defenders who opposed or criticize (the government’s) energy agenda and its implications for the rights of Indigenous peoples and the global climate crisis.” What’s next — the United Nations sends in troops? It seems there is no justification — this being a human-rights thing, you see — for any serious examination of foreign anti-energy funding or activity. That demand may be the surest sign that investigation of some kind is overdue. Kenney scorned Amnesty International on Tuesday during a speech in Fort Mcmurray, saying he formed an Amnesty club in high school, when the organization nobly sought freedom for prisoners of conscience in dictatorial regimes. Today, he said, it backs foreign billionaires trying to block Alberta’s industry. He pointed out that there is remarkably little anti-energy activity from these organizations in places such as Russia or Saudi Arabia, where a person can get in real trouble. At the same time, they ignore every environmental advance in the Alberta industry, including the latest from Suncor. By shifting from coke to natural gas to fire two cogeneration units, at a cost of $1.4 billion, the company expects to cut emissions by 25 per cent, equivalent to removing 550,000 cars from the road. This is a significant reduction in Canadian emissions. There will be no credit whatever from the people who push the anti-oil agenda so hard they’ve succeeded in radicalizing many Albertans. The critics have had a clear field for years. Canada is the soft target, the land whose new tennis star says “I’m sorry” for winning. The federal election campaign starts Wednesday. To kick off his supporting role, Kenney announced that the province will launch a constitutional challenge against Bill C-69, the new federal law many believe will prevent the building of any new pipeline. The Alberta government has complained for years about the demonizing of oil and gas. It always makes a rational case. But never before has the province truly joined the battle. The blowback from interest groups is ferocious. You have to wonder — does Kenney have them worried?
  22. Interesting article from the UK on vaping. https://www.bbc.com/news/newsbeat-49649486 What's behind a vaping illness outbreak in the US? https://www.bbc.com/news/newsbeat-49649486 There have been 450 reported cases of lung illnesses from vaping in the US There's no denying that vapes and e-cigarettes are huge right now, with nearly three million UK users. Vaping - which involves inhaling a mix typically made of nicotine, water, solvents and flavours - is seen as an alternative to smoking which can help you quit, but its safety is still not entirely known. But over in the US, the potential health risks are in the spotlight, where this year there have been 450 reported cases of lung illness tied to vaping. There have also been at least six deaths across 33 states. Image copyright Instagram/Simahherman One of the most shocking stories was of 18-year-old Simah Herman, who posted a picture of herself online after waking up from a medically induced coma. After receiving treatment for pneumonia and lung failure, she wants to warn others against using vapes and e-cigarettes. Simah's story, and that of other vape users, have raised questions about how safe vaping is and how well regulated the industry is. Health officials at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), who are responsible for protecting public health in the US, have been trying to identify what's been causing these problems. What are the symptoms? According to a 2016 survey, there are about 10 million vapers in the US and nearly half of those are under 35, with 18-24-year-olds the most regular users. It comes then as little surprise that many of the 450 people affected are young people, with an average age of 19. The symptoms people have reported experiencing include severe pneumonia, shortness of breath, coughing, fever, fatigue and respiratory failure - where your body either can't break down oxygen, produce carbon dioxide, or both. The result is that your lungs stop working and breathing becomes difficult. Those affected used a number of different devices from vaporisers to smaller e-cigarettes and a variety of different brands of liquids and cartridges. The FDA has now collected over 120 samples to test for different chemicals, including nicotine, cannabinoids, additives and pesticides. What's to blame? Vaping is seen as safer than smoking because lower levels of the harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke are produced Health investigators in the US are trying to establish whether a particular toxin or substance is behind the outbreak, or whether it's the result of heavy usage. One of the theories is that a bad ingredient could have been added to vaping liquids including marijuana products - which are legally available in some US states - namely Vitamin E. Last week, the New York State health department started investigating Vitamin E, calling it a "key focus" of their studies after 34 people became ill in the state. However, the FDA have not settled on Vitamin E as the cause and won't rule out other vaping liquid chemicals. There is also suspicion about "thickeners" that have been added to vaping liquids used in e-cigarettes and vaporisers. In the UK, health experts say they are not aware of any similar incidents with UK-regulated products. Martin Dockrell, Head of Tobacco Control at Public Health England says: "A full investigation is not yet available but we've heard reports that most of these cases were linked to people using illicit vaping fluid bought on the streets or homemade, some containing cannabis products, like THC, or synthetic cannabinoids, like Spice. "Unlike the US, all e-cigarette products in the UK are tightly regulated for quality and safety by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and they operate the Yellow Card Scheme, encouraging vapers to report any bad experiences." Is this a new phenomenon? A man died in the US last year after his vape pen blew up This is not the first time vaping has given cause for concern. The British Medical Journal published a report last year of a woman who was hospitalised with a cough, fever, night sweats and respiratory failure. They found the cause of her problem was a vegetable glycerine found in her e-cigarette, but reported she refused to give it up at the time. As well as being linked to lung problems, there have also been reports of vape pens exploding - in rare cases with fatal consequences. Earlier this year, a 24-year-old man from Texas died when his vape pen's battery blew up sending shards of metal into his face and neck and severing an artery. However, as Public Health England point out, in the UK there are stricter regulations on vaping devices, with their safety and quality checked, meaning this would be a lot less likely to happen. Another problem is that e-cigarettes and vapes are fairly new products so doctors don't know what advice to offer says the chair of the American Academy of Paediatrics tobacco control section, Susan Walley. The advice in the meantime from American health professionals has been to avoid vaping altogether while investigations take place. In the UK, Public Health England's advice remains that e-cigarettes are "a fraction of the risk of smoking". The government agency reminds vapers "to use UK-regulated e-liquids and never risk vaping home-made or illicit e-liquids or adding substances, any of which could be harmful."