Marshall

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  1. A hearty Well Done! 'Riding on a white bird with long wings': Woman flies ultralight aircraft across Atlantic Aarohi Pandit from Mumbai, India, is flying around the world in her light-sport aircraft — in a year-long campaign geared to empowering women to follow their dreams. She arrived in Nunavut last week. Aarohi Pandit says she broke world record as 1st woman to fly across Atlantic in ultralight plane CBC News · Posted: May 20, 2019 7:30 AM CT | Last Updated: 6 hours ago Aarohi Pandit, 23, poses at the Iqaluit airport with her Mahi — an light-sport aircraft — after flying across the Atlantic Ocean. (Travis Burke/CBC) Aarohi Pandit flew across the Atlantic Ocean in an ultralight plane and just arrived in Nunavut — and she says it was "like I'm riding on a white bird with long wings." The 23-year-old from Mumbai, India, has been flying since the age of 17. She's a commercial pilot at home, but recently decided to fly solo around the world in a year-long campaign to empower women. "I just want girls, not just in India but around the world, to know that if you can dream it, you can do it," said Pandit, after flying more than 3,000 kilometres across the ocean in extreme weather conditions. Pandit started her Atlantic stretch in Scotland, and took off from Nuuk, Greenland, last Monday. It took her about four hours and 40 minutes to land in Iqaluit on Tuesday. "I have seen men doing it. I got the thought that if men can do it, why can't a woman?" Pandit says while four men have made the journey by light-sport aircraft, she's the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean in the tiny aircraft named Mahi — a Sinus 912, light-sport aircraft, with a single engine, that weighs just over 400 kilograms. "My aircraft is very small," she said. "It's an ultralight, very light aircraft, so there are lots of limitations." Because of its size, it can only endure a few hours of flying at a time. "It's fun," she said. "It's very light. I feel like I'm riding on a white bird with long wings." Rough weather, beautiful Baffin Island Pandit says the journey didn't come without its bumps — the weather could change every half hour, she said. I was happy to be on land again. It was quite cold. I was freezing.- Aarohi Pandit, pilot "It was quite difficult to manipulate the winds and the clouds, and fly safe, keep myself and my plane safe over the ocean." But Pandit says she enjoyed the views approaching Baffin Island. "It was beautiful," she said. "Blue water everywhere, open skies. It was one of the most beautiful experiences I'll never forget." Pandit's airplane at the Iqaluit airport. She says the journey didn't come without its bumps — the weather could change every half hour, she said. (Travis Burke/CBC) And upon arrival, she was greeted with a warm cup of coffee. "I was happy to be on land again. It was quite cold. I was freezing." Pandit started in India, then stopped in Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, across Europe to Scotland, Iceland, Greenland and finally Canada. Her longest stretch so far has been the first half of the Atlantic journey — from Scotland to Iceland — which took five hours and 20 minutes "because of vigorous winds." Now, Pandit is almost halfway around the world. She'll fly to Alaska, then Russia, and eventually back home. She's hoping to break more records in her circumnavigation journey back to India by July 30 link with video https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/aarohi-pandit-woman-pilot-world-record-1.5142009?cmp=rss
  2. Huge tanker plane arrives in Whitehorse to help train firefighters It's a big plane — and hopes are, it will help put out Yukon wildfires if it comes to it. Fire retardant 'coats the forest fuels much like water, but it lasts longer,' says air attack officer CBC News · Posted: May 20, 2019 8:00 AM CT | Last Updated: 35 minutes ago The Lockheed L-188 Electra arrived to the Whitehorse Air Tanker base last week from Alberta, to help train and prepare Yukon firefighters for the wildfire season. (Philippe Morin/CBC) It's a big plane — and hopes are, it will help put out Yukon wildfires if it comes to it. The Lockheed L-188 Electra arrived to the Whitehorse Airtanker Base last week from Alberta, to help train and prepare Yukon firefighters for the wildfire season. It's as big as a commercial aircraft and there's only a few of them left in Canada. "This year it looks like it's shaping up to be a busier than normal fire season," said Walter Nehring, air attack officer with Yukon Wildland Fire. Nehring said in a busy wildfire year, firefighters may have up to 70 missions. May forest fire ratings about normal for Yukon, but conditions can change quickly Its belly is filled with fire retardant and it can hold 11,000 litres. The red, almost syrup-like liquid is dropped on fires from the sky. It's made of fertilizer and can be toxic, so firefighters would use it as a last resort — but it's more effective than water. The plane goes back and forth from fires, and crews on the ground will rush to fill it up when it lands — even when there's no time to shut off the engines. (Philippe Morin/CBC) "It coats the forest fuels much like water, but it lasts longer. It doesn't evaporate." Nehring said it takes 11 minutes to load the retardant into the plane. Yukon crews fighting wildfire that spread from Tagish property "Usually, they can be rolling in about three minute after that." It goes back and forth from fires, and crews on the ground will rush to fill it up when it lands, even when there's no time to shut off the engines. The red, almost syrup-like fire retardant is dropped on fires from the sky. (Philippe Morin/CBC) "The airplane will pull in and the props keep turning," said Nehring. The plane is owned by a private company called Air Spray and is rented to Yukon for the summer. The company says it's ready to travel to wherever there's danger — whether that's the U.S., South America or even Australia.
  3. I would also bet that criminals did not surrender their guns.
  4. US warns airliners flying over Gulf of 'misidentification' FAA notice says commercial aircraft flying over the Gulf face potential risk of 'miscalculation or misidentification'. US warns airliners flying over Gulf of 'misidentification'U US diplomats warned commercial airliners flying over the wider Gulf of the risk of being "misidentified" amid heightened tensions between the United States and Iran. The warning relayed by US diplomatic posts from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) underlined the risks the current tensions pose to a region crucial to global air travel. It also came as Lloyd's of London warned of increasing risks to maritime shipping in the region. Concerns about a possible conflict have flared since the White House ordered warships and bombers to the region to counter an alleged, unexplained threat from Iran that has seen the US order nonessential diplomatic staff out of Iraq. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/05/warns-carriers-flying-arabian-gulf-misidentification-190518065807097.html
  5. Perhaps an indication that it is time to hang up your spurs??????
  6. I wonder what the takeoff weight is. I don't expect they carry cargo so it would (in addition to fuel etc.) only the passengers and their baggage.
  7. CUPE wades in. Merger of Air Canada and Transat: CUPE will hold the new employer accountable Français News provided by Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) May 16, 2019, 13:49 ET OTTAWA, May 16, 2019 /CNW/ - The union representing Air Canada's and Air Transat's flight attendants will hold the new employer accountable for promises made to employees if a merger agreement is finalized. "Air Canada President and Chief Executive, Colin Rovinescu said that employees of both companies will benefit from increased job security and growth prospects," said the president of the Air Canada Component of CUPE, Wesley Lesosky. "According to Transat President and Chief Executive Officer Jean-Marc Eustache, this merger is the best prospect for not only maintaining, but growing the business and jobs," added the president of the Air Transat Component of CUPE, Julie Roberts. "We will make sure that these commitments to our members are respected," noted Lesosky and Roberts. "CUPE is Canada's biggest union with more than 680,000 members across the country. We will use all our collective power to defend the interests of our members at Air Canada and Air Transat," said CUPE National President Mark Hancock. "In CUPE, we combine our resources to help each other. If the proposed merger translated into attacks against our members, CUPE National will be there in full strength to support them," said CUPE National Secretary-Treasurer Charles Fleury. CUPE represents more than 9,000 flight attendants at Air Canada and Rouge and 2,000 flight attendants at Air Transat. SOURCE Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) For further information: Philippe Gagnon, Communications Officer, 613-894-0146, pgagnon@scfp.ca Related Links https://cupe.ca/
  8. Holly cow batman. Best of luck to all in their new future.
  9. If it is WestJet then I suspect Swoop would become history.
  10. Re surviving on one salary and no longer being able to do so. I suspect it is more about the "expected needs" / change in acceptable life styles, rather than any concentration of wealth.
  11. CUPE files to represent WestJet Encore flight attendants News provided by Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Apr 11, 2019, 18:59 ET Share this article OTTAWA, April 11, 2019 /CNW/ - The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) has filed an application at the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) to represent flight attendants at WestJet Encore. A majority of WestJet Encore flight attendants have signed cards supporting unionization with CUPE, after citing the need for better schedules and better opportunities for career advancement among their reasons for seeking to unionize. CUPE is thrilled to get to work improving the lives of Encore staff. "CUPE has industry-leading experience and expertise in improving the working conditions and the lives of our flight attendant members," said CUPE National President Mark Hancock. "We look forward to adding Encore flight attendants to our airline family." Flight attendants have a tough job ensuring the safety of their passengers at 20,000 feet, along with challenging working conditions and often unpredictable schedules. But being part of a union makes a world of difference, as flight attendants at WestJet mainline can already attest. "Most definitely, my life is a lot better after joining CUPE," said Kruti Sutaria, who is now the secretary-treasurer of CUPE Local 4070, representing WestJet mainline flight attendants. In July 2018, CUPE was certified to represent roughly 3,000 flight attendants at WestJet's mainline carrier. CUPE is Canada's flight attendant union, representing 15,000 flight attendants at ten different airlines nationwide. SOURCE Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) For further information: Hugh Pouliot, Media relations, CUPE, 613-818-0067, hpouliot@cupe.ca Related Links https://cupe.ca/ Also from this source Media Advisory - CUPE Ontario President Fred Hahn Media...
  12. Determination No. A-2019-14 January 30, 2019 APPLICATION by Swoop Inc. (Swoop) for an exemption from certain provisions of the Canada Transportation Act, S.C., 1996, c. 10, as amended (CTA), and the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58, as amended (ATR). Case number: 18-05254 APPLICATION [1] Swoop has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for an exemption, pursuant to paragraph 80(1)(c) of the CTA, from the requirements of paragraph 67(1)(b), subsection 67(3) and section 67.1 of the CTA, and paragraph 107(1)(o) of the ATR. THE LAW [2] The CTA requires that all Canadian air carriers holding a domestic licence have a tariff, which is a schedule of their fares, rates, charges and terms and conditions of carriage applicable to the provision of their services and other incidental services. [3] As part of its tariff obligations, under paragraph 67(1)(b) of the CTA, the holder of a domestic licence must identify a basic fare for all the routes that it offers. The “basic fare” is defined in section 55 of the CTA as follows: (a) the fare in the tariff of the holder of a domestic licence that has no restrictions and represents the lowest amount to be paid for one-way air transportation of an adult with reasonable baggage between two points in Canada, or (b) where the licensee has more than one such fare between two points in Canada and the amount of any of those fares is dependent on the time of day or day of the week of travel, or both, the highest of those fares; [4] Subsection 67(3) of the CTA provides that the holder of a domestic licence shall not apply any fare, rate, charge or term or condition of carriage unless the fare, rate, charge, term or condition is set out in a tariff that has been published or displayed and is in effect. [5] Section 67.1 of the CTA provides the Agency with authority, on complaint, to take certain actions where the holder of a domestic licence has contravened subsection 67(3) of the CTA and applied a fare, rate, charge or term or condition of carriage that is not set out in its tariff. [6] Paragraph 107(1)(o) of the ATR provides that the carrier must have the tolls listed in their tariff. [7] Paragraph 80(1)(c) of the CTA allows the Agency to exempt a regulated entity from compliance with a statutory provision if the Agency is of the opinion that compliance “is unnecessary, undesirable or impractical”. [8] Section 5 of the CTA sets out the National Transportation Policy, and states, among other things, that “competition and market forces, both within and among the various modes of transportation, are the prime agents in providing viable and effective transportation services”. POSITION OF THE APPLICANT [9] Swoop states that, for modern air travel, the setting of fares is dynamic, individualized and flexible, particularly for ultra-low-cost carriers (ULCCs). It contends that the provisions of the CTA and ATR, from which it is seeking an exemption, did not contemplate the modern air travel marketplace and business models such as those used by ULCCs, and that compliance with them would be disruptive and counter to its business model. ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS [10] There is a distinction to be made between the different provisions from which Swoop has requested an exemption. Paragraph 67(1)(b) of the CTA specifically establishes the requirement to identify the basic fare in the carrier’s domestic tariff. Section 67.1 and subsection 67(3) of the CTA, and paragraph 107(1)(o) of the ATR are more broadly related to a carrier’s tariff obligations. [11] With respect to paragraph 67(1)(b) of the CTA, the Agency finds that the applicant has provided sufficient arguments and evidence to establish, on a preliminary basis, that compliance with paragraph 67(1)(b) is “unnecessary, undesirable or impractical”. The legal requirement that a basic fare has no restrictions and allows for the transportation of baggage at no additional cost means that, in practice, for most carriers, the basic fare listed in the tariff is higher than many of the fares on offer in the marketplace. In the specific context of the ULCC’s business model—which is particularly characterized by dynamic price setting, non-refundable fares with restrictions on changes, and the unbundling of fares so that travellers select the services for which they want to pay—the obligation to include such a basic fare in the tariff would appear to have no material benefit to passengers and to impose an unnecessary administrative burden. Given the interests of travellers in having choices in the market and the National Transportation Policy’s emphasis on competition, this burden should only be imposed if it achieves some purpose. [12] That said, to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the implications of a longer-term exemption from compliance with paragraph 67(1)(b) for Swoop and, potentially, other carriers with comparable business models, the Agency will undertake a 60-day consultation to allow stakeholders and other interested parties to provide information and their views. [13] With respect to subsection 67(3) and section 67.1 of the CTA, and paragraph 107(1)(o) of the ATR, the Agency finds that Swoop has not provided persuasive arguments and evidence in support of an exemption. Such an exemption would give Swoop unreasonable competitive advantages in the marketplace and unduly limit the rights of, and availability of recourse to, passengers. CONCLUSION [14] The Agency, in accordance with paragraph 80(1)(c) of the CTA, exempts Swoop from compliance with paragraph 67(1)(b) of the CTA for a period of 180 days from the issuance of this Determination. During that time, the Agency will undertake consultations, which will help to inform a subsequent decision on whether the exemption should be extended or made indefinite. [15] The Agency denies Swoop’s application for an exemption from the requirements of subsection 67(3) and section 67.1 of the CTA, and paragraph 107(1)(o) of the ATR.
  13. It is always wise, to always consider the source, the context and not just the words.