Longranger

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Longranger last won the day on August 8 2015

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  1. Beaverboy, not sure where you get your information from, but you are out by a $100 million as it was $118 million for the 2015 pilot agreement that would have run for four years NOT $18 million. Must say you are being consistent though with the ALPA mantra of untruths that never seems to end. It’s interesting that if you listened to the 4th quarter conference call from WJ with analysts, the question was asked how much CASM cost increases for 2019 for the new pilot contract plus all the other employee groups negotiating new agreements, and the answer was..... Zero to 2%. Aside from YOS, which is good to see, don’t see where the large amounts of money are going unless that includes the 500 extra pilots that will hired. Many pilots especially WB pilots are seeing the lowest take home pay, they have ever seen yet since our new contract started on January 1st. Most pilots except those benefiting from YOS, will see reduced T4’s and it will be interesting to see what comes out of the pension negotiations because not one more penny is actually going into the “pension” line item, just some choices possibly between 20% ESP and or 10%ESP and 10 % some sort of pension program, with still the same total dollars.
  2. Johnny, If as by your post you are implying you work for AC, and if that is the case, unless you were on the negotiating team, I would take a lot of external information with a grain of salt. I wasn’t involved in the negotiations either, but any person that would have ever been involved knows that during many negotiations a lot of things get said and positions are taken, during the process. In the end, all that matters is the end result to both parties. If one party takes an extreme position, that forces the the other to come back with one as well, and ALPA was using Delta for example as a comparator, and telling pilots they were substantially underpaid, and the arbitration proved that not to be the case. I don’t have a current ACPA contract in front of me but the hourly rate on both the 787/767 today, with the ESP included, but none of the other equity uplifts that we get, is within pennies of the rate from March of 2018 for the 787 at AC mainline. As well we were due for a another bigger raise in 2020, if ALPA was able to capture a previous MOA agreement that was negotiated by the WJPA. I don’t have an Encore agreement handy, and it is now under negotiation but, it was competitive with the Jazz ALPA agreement, and we’ll see what happens with their next agreement and as well what ALPA at Jazz is voting on now for the new CPA terms. No one is a victim in this process, as the pilots had a right to join ALPA, and the process played out and the results are there, and most pilots are not too happy about it.
  3. Johnny maybe you should research your facts before using second hand information, and from CUPE newsletters? Grooming has recently become a more contentious issue , and whipped out of proportion first with the initial attempt with the WPPA and then through ALPA, as before that there were very few issues with it. Since the start of WJ, grooming for pilots (with the exception of the 767/787) has always been voluntary, part of the culture of working together, when you had time. It was also all part of the team effort to get quicker turn arounds, and since it saved tens of millions of dollars over the years, increased profit sharing. Since pilots earn the most and profit sharing is based on straight time earnings, it is easy math to see they are the biggest beneficiaries of increased profit sharing not to mention on their ESP stock options etc. Prior to the last year and a half, the profit sharing averaged over 10% of any employees straight time earnings, so not chump change by any measure. Leave it to CUPE to talk about “ writing up” employees as how would they really know as they are new on the property and have a vested interest in creating animosity against the company. I’ve been here for twenty years and haven’t seen that, but it’s all a matter of perspective and in that case who you talk to, so what statistics and facts do you have to back it up? The attrition rate at WJ mainline has been and continues to be very low, just over 1%, with most of the pilots that are leaving going overseas not to AC, unless you are talking about WestJet Encore or Swoop, which is a different story. We used to have one date of hire list between WJ mainline and Encore for example, but now that is up in the air with ALPA , so that uncertainty has caused more Encore pilots then would have gone under the old model to leave. Swoop is another story, as ALPA’s handling of that group, forced the company to hire off the street pilots, and the WAWCON there has caused turnover in pilots to be higher then it would have been. The pay at WJ mainline is well beyond the “ average “ you describe, and if you look at the total compensation, which is the only fair way to measure compensation, but not “ industry standard “ for some people, it is very competitive with AC.
  4. It’s on the record that the application was made back in June...draw your own conclusions.
  5. Yes, exactly why I made the reference to the federal government now in office, and you would hope that they had some idea of how the business model of ULCC’s work. As well we all know that lawyers and judges make a good living interpreting the law, even if the language does seem clear to some of us when we read them. Parliament can also change laws, or do it via an order in council, which sidesteps parliament altogether.
  6. Interesting article, it’s generating a lot of free PR for Swoop, and it shows Gabor’s lack of knowledge of what a ULCC is compared to an LCC, and especially his example of a full service airline such as Air Canada. An apples to oranges comparison, and it’s the Federal Government which has been actively encouraging ULCC’s to start up in Canada, and why they changed and raised the foreign ownership rules up to 49% for new ULCC’s. It’s pretty clear on the website that a checked back is extra and escalates in price if not done online, and that the base fare is only for the seat. This guy is teaching at university and can’t read that? The PR dept at Swoop must be laughing at all the free exposure and hits to the website for zero cost. It’s really not a complicated fare structure to understand, and I guess he’s never heard of unbundled fares and only paying for what you want..... just like any ULCC in the world.
  7. Neelman cofounded Morris Air which was bought and merged into SouthWest, provided startup advice to WestJet, started JetBlue, as was already mentioned, and started up Azul in Brazil, and is co-owner in the turn around at 73 year old TAP Air Portugal. All of these are successful, and this latest venture, if you go by his track record should be as well.