xxx

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xxx last won the day on April 21 2012

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  1. I too ,in the last number of years have noticed the high incidence of over runs of 737-800 and 737-900 aircraft. My theories are, 1. The aircraft sits lower ,due to the desire by Boeing to have low cargo doors for ground personnel to unload the aircraft without the need for extra equipment. The 800 and 900 have very long fuselages and low mounted engines. This requires very high speeds for take off and landing to prevent tail strikes. 2. On wet surfaces with the high speeds, compared to larger wide bodys with more gear and rubber, are at a disadvantage. They use a lot of runway. So, one cannot just assume that because a widebody landed with no issue, that a 737 should not have a problem. 3. The 737 have a more primtive auto throttle system, when Autopilot is disengaged, the autothrottle must be disengaged prior to landing. Other aircraft types, the autothrottle or autothrust system remains on. This presents a huge challenge to maintain speed. The airspeed can easily creep up on short final. To counter act the increase in speed there is a tendency to pull up to bleed off the speed, as well as pilots transitioning from instruments to visual in poor weather usually pull back as the runway rushes toward them. These actions will use up valuable runway. 4. The physical size of the throttles on the 737 can be tough to move and then get the reversers deployed can be a huge issue. Other aircraft are much easier. 5. The 737-800 and 737-900 use steel brakes as opposed to Max that uses carbon brakes. Max stops better. In general, the 737 should be respected and tail wind landings avoided. The 737 is not an entry level aircraft , but many operators in the world , including Canada, are treating it like it is. Any other theories are appreciated.