mrlupin

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mrlupin last won the day on September 6 2016

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  1. You seem to have a very different version of history Marshall, when did the IAMAW merge ramp staff and AMEs in your version? Are you referring to CP, AC or both? From what I recall, CP's AMEs were separate from Ramp services and at AC, the IAM has always had Ramp and AMEs together. Presently at the maple leaf carrier, although ramp services negotiates at a different table than AMEs, the ratification of the contract (it is a single contract) is a collective vote. The employer only has to dangle some sort of carrot to the ramp group and they will vote any contract through regardless of the AME part of the contract. (a signing bonus would do the job...) This gives the employer an incredible opportunity to dictate salary and condition regardless of supply and demand, skills, inflation etc.... In 2003, salaries and conditions were chopped and frozen for 10 years by the employer and a judge, in 2011 or 2012 a contract was imposed by the Conservative government. In 2016, a 10 year, meager contract was voted in by ramp services and the AMEs got this imposed to them. In the same time, we had the massive layoff at Bombardier, we had AC sell create ACTS, sell it off as Aveos and that shell company went under in 2012 with massive layoffs. The original post was that of the industry having issues recruiting. I restate what I said: "It's not a labor shortage, it's people learning that if they want stability (ie no layoffs like at Bombardier or Aveos), mobility and decent wages,they have a multitude of other fields they can work in. Kids have choices... The aviation industry has to do a better job at selling itself as a respectable field to work in. "
  2. Nothing like a ride in an old B737-200 to lure AMEs... 18.50$/hour... They are about 5$ short from where the competition starts their apprentices at... It's not a labor shortage, it's people learning that if they want stability (ie no layoffs like at Bombardier or Aveos), mobility and decent wages,they have a multitude of other fields they can work in. Kids have choices... The aviation industry has to do a better job at selling itself as a respectable field to work in. The industry giants did this to themselves...
  3. There's nothing from TC so the operators are free to establish whatever policies they want and under SMS, not following those policies has no repercussions.
  4. If you search the web, you will find incidents where the final outcome is for Transport Canada to set Duty days for AMEs but the regulator hasn't acted on the recommendations. Last time I am aware that it was brought up at CARAC, both Westjet and AC were lobbying against it.
  5. Boestar, What are the AME duty days? I have yet to find them...
  6. 24/7 businesses should have sufficient rest time for employees. (ie duty days) Eight hours of rest is quite different than 8 hours between shifts. There is room for improvements in the current regulations. Also, shifts have changed, most companies are operating on a condensed work week shift (ie 4 to 5 days of 11 or 12 hr shifts). It's quite normal after 11 hours at work to be fatigued. Human factors training teaches us the importance of rest... Wouldn't it be coherent for the policies to reflect basic HF? For the drafting of OT, historically it's always been a zoo. From staff coming to work with their kids, to employees
  7. We were told the MAX was chosen at AC due to an approximate 10 million$ per plane purchase cost advantage... I wonder how much of that cost advantage is left....
  8. If I can find someone who was involved in the transition of the pilots from CALPA to ACPA, it would be very helpful to understand the ups and downs of the process. Thanks,
  9. Conehead, I don't really have an approach... It's mostly data gathering at this point. Guiding AMEs in a direction is a bit like herding cats. That makes me curious as to how the pilot group did it. I now realize now that the seniority list merger was a great uniting element in the process.
  10. I would like to know the specifics as to: How ACPA was formed? How it was financed? How was the new structure created? How did the transition go? What kind of hiccups were encountered? Thanks
  11. Sounds like I have just asked for classified information... lol We at ACM are "represented" by the IAM. We have the same bargaining unit for both Station Services and Maintenance. The end result is that in the current structure, we are not being represented. Our voices are not being heard. This last 10 year contract would have never passed in its current form had we had separate ratification from the baggage handlers. A petition with over 85% of the ACM staff was presented in January to the IAM for separating the bargaining unit. The incumbent union is refusing to give us a separate bargaining unit. Within the IAM, we have no way of forcing the separation due to the fact that stations services outnumbers maintenance staff 5 to 1. So prior to deciding what comes next, I seek to learn the why, what and how other groups have handled lack of representation issues. So lets call my reason "educational purposes" for the moment.
  12. Hello, I'm looking for some information on the formative period prior to the creation of ACPA and during it's rise to become the bargaining agent for the Air Canada Pilot group. Is there reading material on this subject? I'm not looking for names specifically, it's more a question of understanding the reason for formation and the process to get there. PM me if it's simpler that way. Thanks,
  13. More Boeing press... https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-06-28/boeing-s-737-max-software-outsourced-to-9-an-hour-engineers