Don Hudson

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Everything posted by Don Hudson

  1. Barney; First, the questions you've asked are on everyone's mind, but they're impossible to answer meaningfully. However, if you really want to face that question seriously and without illusions, take a look at some of the forces at play and the figures publicly available: 1. Average # of passengers boarded each day this week - about 39,000. This time three years ago, AC was boarding around 55,000 and CAI probably another 28,000 or so. Temporary certainly, but how temporary? Will this "teach" passengers that they don't have to travel? 2. Hong Kong, once the money-maker for AC at two fu
  2. IFG; Re "did you guys in Lotusland hear about our "Rae Days" back when?" Absolutely we did...we watched Rae with a lot of interest. He was the one who said to a reporter that, although slightly left wing, , he resented the impression that he was born with a silver spoon in his mouth, and what's more, the upstairs maid, cook and nannies also resented it. dh
  3. Duke; I get the very strong sense that AC will have changed radically by the time a year has gone by. The result may worth the price of admission... One sense will be that aspect of community and common cause which, through forces largely beyond our control, have prevented us all from aiming our gaze outwards instead of in. Don
  4. Mr Frustrated; Re "Wages are a very small part of the overall cost equation but takes the most focus as it appears the easiest solution." With this, I agree. In direct costs (no benefits/pensions/sick days etc added in), on a full A340 with 284 passengers, each passenger will pay about $28CAD for their flight crew on a 13hr flight to Hong Kong, and perhaps $30 if there's a fourth. That's about the same as the security fee and the Airport Improvement Fee combined. Think about that for a moment. On domestic flights, the amount is smaller. On corporate culture... I have seen dagg
  5. Hello Greg; Lovely day on the coast... Re "This then all fits with what you have said in your post, and also seems to be consistent with the actions that Judge Farley has taken, particularly in regard to his appointing of Judge Winkler." Yes, I think so. That is the sense I have of it. I believe for those with the antennae, the signals are very strong indeed. "What I'm trying to sort out in my own mind is this. It appears to me that the courts are taking a very activist position in all of the proceedings and they are not going to allow anyone to put AC into liquidation. Would you agree
  6. Hello Phil; Always good to see your thoughts. If recent jurisprudence indicates that collective agreements have the same level of legal authority and protection as business contracts, (in other words, if a company breaks a collective agreement, its breaking the law and can be prosecuted), then I think that is a good thing. In BC however, we are not as enlightened, and the Liberals are still doing as they wish....A rabbit trail I will pursue here no further. Re "This is a more than strong enough incentive in my book." Agreed. Completely... Don
  7. Greg; I strongly suspect the judge has the power to unilaterally "create" an agreement. Labour law does not consider Collective Agreements "sacrosanct" in the same sense that a business contract is. We only need to take a look at our own Liberals here in BC and their unilateral cancellation of the BC Nurses Union contract last year to know that this is possible. In Negots 2000, Federal Minister Bradshaw indicated to us during our work with Mr Outhouse that it would be in our best interests to settle. While we may value the results in different ways, there was little doubt that an "agreemen
  8. Hello John; Great day on the west coast, eh? Re " ... what are your thoughts as to moving the scope line?" They've changed over the years and with circumstances. "Scope" after all, is your issue as well with the 3rd tier carriers and its not a simple answer regardless of which part of AC one flies for. On scope, really, there's no percentage in setting up a stationary target from an old ACPA guy, simply so others can shoot at will. I suppose I don't mind having my thoughts shot at, but that specific exercise is pointless and I don't have the time, nor do I want to engage in the scope d
  9. (Posted as a new topic to bring the thread forward) JakeYYZ; Don't disagree with a thing you've written in your message to Mitch, especially about CCAA not being an accident, (May 11). Re "A gentlemen’s agreement not to poach one another’s business, is not what free enterprise and competition are all about." ... and competition for all. All except for the "former" Air Canada. This industry has never been fully de-regulated. Its free market for only a few. If AC had been free of government interference, government policies and government/ministerial politics like other major companies i
  10. (Posted as a new topic to bring the thread forward) JakeYYZ; Don't disagree with a thing you've written in your message to Mitch, especially about CCAA not being an accident, (May 11). Re "A gentlemen’s agreement not to poach one another’s business, is not what free enterprise and competition are all about." ... and competition for all. All except for the "former" Air Canada. This industry has never been fully de-regulated. Its free market for only a few. If AC had been free of government interference, government policies and government/ministerial politics like other major companies i
  11. (Posted as a new topic to bring the thread forward) JakeYYZ; Don't disagree with a thing you've written in your message to Mitch, especially about CCAA not being an accident, (May 11). Re "A gentlemen’s agreement not to poach one another’s business, is not what free enterprise and competition are all about." ... and competition for all. All except for the "former" Air Canada. This industry has never been fully de-regulated. Its free market for only a few. If AC had been free of government interference, government policies and government/ministerial politics like other major companies i
  12. (Posted as a new topic to bring the thread forward) JakeYYZ; Don't disagree with a thing you've written in your message to Mitch, especially about CCAA not being an accident, (May 11). Re "A gentlemen’s agreement not to poach one another’s business, is not what free enterprise and competition are all about." All except for the "former" Air Canada. This industry has never been fully de-regulated. Its free market for only a few. If AC had been free of government interference, government policies and government/ministerial politics like other major companies in Canada like Bombardier*, GE
  13. (Posted as a new topic to bring the thread forward) JakeYYZ; Don't disagree with a thing you've written in your message to Mitch, especially about CCAA not being an accident, (May 11). Re "A gentlemen’s agreement not to poach one another’s business, is not what free enterprise and competition are all about." All except for the "former" Air Canada. This industry has never been fully de-regulated. Its free market for only a few. If AC had been free of government interference, government policies and government/ministerial politics like other major companies in Canada like Bombardier*, GE
  14. Snowshoes; Re "Since we lost our own forum last year, I find it very difficult to sense on a timely basis what my ACPA representatives frame of mind is." The AC Pilots Private Forum is an excellent "commons" where everyone meets electronically. Try, http://pub15.ezboard.com/baircanadapilotsprivateforum and get signed on. I'm sure the moderator will help out. In my opinion, the mini-WAWCON survey, (which is the way they should all be, but many wouldn't agree) is the right thing to do and gives the MEC/Negots/LRD a good basis upon which to take action. Like motions at meetings, such su
  15. Hi Snowshoes; Re "I wonder why I have to get the latest ACPA perspective from you on this forum instead of our MEC chair..." Hear you: silence isn't always golden when you're looking for info on how things are going. However, in my opinion and for me as a member, the ACPA communications have been timely, informative and appropriate. Let me make an observation on why I think this is so and why I think we should accept the level of communication we have as sufficient, at least for the time being: There is a difference between the communications offered informally as an opinion by an
  16. Oh, okay CA...thanks too, for the clarification. I just thought folks would like to know how ACPA did their voting. We actually vote via the web or by phone. Very slick and efficient. Cheers, Don
  17. Dagger, and others following this initiative: A great deal has, and is going on underneath this kind of initiative. It is not, as some may perceive, "about time"... ACPA has been in serious discussion about serious matters for a long time, and intends, as the press release states, to do its part. For those who think that voting will take too much time, please remember two things: 1. Voting will not take much time. For those not in ACPA, we do it electronically and it can be done very quickly. The time being taken is not to accomodate the voting process, but to accomodate flight schedules
  18. b52er; Look...its bad enough for the security of our entire industry that someone tried to sell this document for money. And its even worse when the dumb newspapers make money broadcasting exactly what's in the manual to even more people than its reached already by this fiasco. But posts that reproduce the newspaper story once again for the entire anonymous world to see and perhaps use is irresponsible and I think the post should be deleted. Nobody here needs to know that information and it is now freely given to those who might now try to obtain information in other ways. Don't we ge
  19. Originally addressed to neo, but important for all airline employees: As stated before, airline employees know their industry is in trouble and I am confident would be willing to do their part. But the realities of power politics has to be taken into account in any decision by employees to "give at the office". The relative "safety" of organizations which largely hide in the weeds,(while employees are highly visible) as they take money from airlines (our passengers, really) for "services rendered etc", has to be understood as we consider how we are to collectively come to terms with our
  20. Dagger; No strike is "successful". It is a sign of failure. There are others far more capable than I who can (and if necessary, should) discuss this first ACA pilots' strike, but the failure must be shared, and not attributed to the pilots alone. These things arise out of sincere intentions to avoid the final act, as well as mistaken signals which confuse and anger the already-primed parties. I will not go into details as I simply don't have the time or interest on this issue anymore, but I will say that the labour relations climate all through 1998 (after Interest-Based Bargaining