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  1. Are these gents part of Trudeau's diversity and inclusion platform?
    2 points
  2. Gun control isn't the issue here... propaganda techniques are. The gun control issue is a perfect example, nothing provides better proof of its existence or a better case study in the deployment and weaponization of state created propaganda and media cooperation. If you say the same thing over and over again, aided and abetted by cooperative media outlets, you can turn a simple semiautomatic rifle with a 5 round box magazine into a military assault rifle. Freeland defends Liberals' move to ban military-style assault guns The question they will never answer is on par with asking a greenie what they want cut to hit accord targets. How did a semi-automatic rifle (without selective fire) morph into an assault rifle and is there any military in the world who uses the AR-15 and a 5 round magazine as a issued battle rifle? We know the answer here... right? Those who disagree may be interested in the 15 year old 3/4 ton truck (regular cab) I have for sale. It's a bit pricy though because the racing stripes I added have morphed it into a Ferrari. It's now a Ferrari-style racing truck. Now, consider the headlines if this "racing truck" was purchased by a deranged individual and employed as a weapon at a Canada Day gathering. Would people support a ban on Ferrari-style racing trucks because they are the weapon of choice for evil doers? The only difference between the issues here is that a clear majority of people are familiar enough with pickup trucks to recognize the lie, see the absurdity in it and call BS. No amount of repetition, false equivalency or racing stripes is going to improve the 0-60 time of the truck, so in the ad I'll just describe the acceleration to be "as expected for a vehicle of this caliber." ( sorry, best I could do at a pun)
    2 points
  3. Agreed….all the claims of genocide will make both the indigenous community and the government look disingenuous in the eyes of the world.
    2 points
  4. Thank God I had a gas generator!
    2 points
  5. The reason nothing has been dug up is that if they do dig, and the findings are not as implied, the money truck drives away. I find it amazing they can recall their oral history for thousands of years, but they can't remember if they sent a child to school, and they didn't come home.
    2 points
  6. WOW !! Does this put things in perspective……from California no less…
    2 points
  7. 87-year-old pilot ends elite flying career with cross-country flight to N.B. George Miller's 68-year career at the controls ended at the airport that started it all Shane Fowler · CBC News · Posted: May 19, 2022 7:00 AM AT | Last Updated: 4 hours ago After flying for nearly 70 years, George Miller descended from the skies one last time to land in New Brunswick. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) "Nobody's flown that low at this airport in 20 years." That quip came from a Miramichi-Chatham Airport employee about 87-year-old George Miller's visit in his 1940s-era Ryan Navion. Roaring by the eastern New Brunswick airport under a blazing sun, the Navion's unpainted silver fuselage reflected so much sunlight it stung the eyes. The plane has a 1950s sci-fi movie spaceship vibe, from back when the future was made of chrome. WATCH | George Miller's emotional final flight Pilot's emotional final flight after 7 decades of flying 7 hours ago Duration6:45 George Miller's storied career culminates with a flight across Canada and a parked piece of history. Aircraft fanatics would recognize its fighter plane lineage. Designed by the same company that built the legendary Second World War P-51 Mustang, the Navion emits a throaty growl as it flies by. They don't make planes like this anymore. And on this spring afternoon, the Navion came out of the sky for the last time, touching down at the Miramichi-Chatham Airport. It will never fly again. Neither will its pilot. Meet Miller "I just love that airplane," said George Miller. "And I know that it'll be hard to finally take the last look at it." "It's a real gut-wrencher to give it up." After spending 68 years in the air, George Miller is saying goodbye to flying and goodbye to his Navion, flying it across Canada to donate it to a New Brunswick museum. Born on Fogo Island off Newfoundland's north shore in 1935, Miller recalls being enraptured by a float plane delivering supplies to the island when he was just six years old. On his 18th birthday, he signed up with the RCAF. For the next 35 years he was a fighter pilot. And it was this little New Brunswick airport that gave him his start. 'A crazy career' In his early air force days, Miller says the first transonic fighter jets, planes capable of flying as fast as the sound barrier, were just coming into service. He put in a request to be trained to fly them. To this day, he still can't believe it was granted. Miller moved to New Brunswick and started training to fly CF-86 Sabre fighter planes, an aircraft first flown against Russian MiG's in the Korean War. The airport was a military hub then, much bigger than the humble airstrip it is today. Built immediately after the Second World War, Miller's Navion is a four-seater plane that he's been flying for the last 20 years. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) "This was our major, major fighter base, like Cold Lake is right now in Alberta," said Miller. "It's part of my soul, really, because I grew up with it," said Miller of the Miramichi-Chatham Airport. "I was so involved with, and so engrossed with the whole fighter business and the air force." Miller's first tour in 1955 was flying Sabres in Germany in the early years of the Cold War. "Basically, that was to counter the impending Russian threat because the Russians … they really had plans on moving into Europe and the threat was real," said Miller. "And then, of course, we'd be in the Third World War." Nuclear era He eventually upgraded to the Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, a jet capable of flying at twice the speed of sound. It was also capable of nuclear strikes, carrying US-supplied nuclear weapons. After piloting the Starfighters in Germany, Miller was transferred to Sardinia, Italy where he trained Canadian pilots on transporting and deploying nuclear weapons. Miller ran a sea survival school, training pilots who ejected or parachuted over water how to survive. Miller's Navion at the Miramichi-Chatham airport. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) He also spent time in the 1970s in Kingston, Ont., as the director of the Air Force Staff College, and then was sent to Egypt when that country was entering into peace talks with Israel. "That was an amazing time in my career … and they gave me one year of intensive Arabic language training, so I became bilingual in Arabic … and I had some crazy missions across the 'no man's land.' "I was often in the centre of it, trying to get intelligence for the Canadian government," said Miller. After stints in Israel and Sudan, Miller retired after 35 years in the RCAF. "That was a crazy career," he said. Hawks and Snowbirds Miller was also part of both of Canada's high-flying air force stunt squads. His talent flying those first Sabres landed him a spot on the 1962 Golden Hawks squad. The Golden Hawks would showcase high-speed manoeuvres and stunts at airshows, wowing crowds across the country. Miller, far right, was a member of the Golden Hawks, Canada's first national military aerobatic team, predating the Snowbirds. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) In 1973, he went to Moose Jaw, Sask., to help fashion the newly formed Snowbirds flight squadron into a national aerobatic team. The Snowbirds still perform across Canada today. Miller eventually formed his own flying aerobatic team after retirement, the Fraser Blues, flying alongside his son, putting on shows throughout British Columbia. WATCH | George Miller shows off his 1940s-era Ryan Navion one last time 1947 Ryan Navion aircraft walkaround 7 hours ago Duration10:43 Pilot George Miller shows off his Ryan Navion before donating it to the New Brunswick Aviation Museum. Miller's plane for those shows was the Navion. But despite still being in excellent health, this was the year to give up flying, he said. "I feel very capable of flying, there's no problem there," he said. "But I think it's good to be sensible. "I've done enough 'hundred-dollar hamburger' type trips, where you spend a hundred dollars in gas for a 15-dollar hamburger." Donating history When Miller started selling his beloved Navion, he spoke to Kevin Anderson, the executive director and founder of the New Brunswick Aviation Museum. Anderson has been working since 2013 to create a museum showcasing the province's aviation history. The current museum collection sits in a hanger off the tarmac at the Miramichi–Chatham airport. It already includes George Miller's flight suits from both the Golden Hawks and Snowbirds. It will now also include the Navion. Kevin Anderson, executive director and the founder of the New Brunswick Aviation Museum, is grateful for Miller's donated plane. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) Miller decided to cancel the sale of his plane and donate it to the fledging museum. "Well, I had a pretty big smile on, I'll say that much," said Anderson. "The reason that it was important for us to get it is that with the Golden Hawks being formed here in 1959 they were a huge part of Canada's aerobatic team history," said Anderson. This concept art is for the New Brunswick Aviation Museum that Anderson says is on track to be built in the coming years. It will house Miller's donated Navion. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) Trip of a lifetime Miller decided to deliver the Navion to New Brunswick himself, making the final flight from his home in Langley, B.C. His plan was to wait for good weather in early summer to fly across the country one last time. But on May 1, as he was going to bed, he checked the weather on his phone. He was shocked to find the perfect tailwind flowing across Canada. "I couldn't believe it," said Miller. "It was from coast to coast. This was a Sunday, and I said, 'I'm leaving Monday,' and I did." The perfect co-pilot But at 87, Miller knew he couldn't complete the trip alone. With any older plane, maintenance and upkeep is a constant variable, so he'd need someone who wasn't just along for the ride. He chose 27-year-old engineer Freya Inkster. "She's an absolutely wonderful maintenance engineer," said Miller. A pilot herself, she maintains about 30 to 40 airplanes, including Miller's, and said she was honoured when he asked her to help him make his final flight. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/the-final-flight-of-george-miller-1.6451216 Freya Inkster has been the Navion's maintenance engineer in Langley, B.C., for years. She maintained the plane on Miller's final flight. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) A good thing too. About halfway through the trip the Navion started having engine troubles and had to land in Kenora, Ont. "I was thinking, 'Please don't be a cylinder,' but it was a cylinder," said Inkster. She ended up having to replace it, shipping in a rebuilt one they luckily had back in Langley. The rest of the flight went by without incident. "This one is special," said Inkster. "Every single Navion is different, it doesn't matter if they were from the same year, every one is different." Final landing Last Thursday, after nearly seven decades of flying, Miller descended out of the sky for the final time. To his surprise, two fire trucks arched streams of water across the runway as a welcome. After an emotional hug with Anderson, Miller handed him the keys to his plane. "An end of an era, that's for sure," said Miller. "I'm hoping that when the new museum is open, I'll come back here, and I'll take Freya with me, and come back and see it, and that will be the last time I will see it." Miller with his Navion. (Shane Fowler/CBC News)
    2 points
  8. One year later, there is still no evidence of unmarked graves or missing children at former residential schools Brian Giesbrecht is a retired judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba, Nina Green is an independent researcher, and Tom Flanagan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of True North. May 27, 2022 will mark the one year anniversary of a shocking event that changed the course of Canadian history. Last year on May 27th, Chief Rosanne Casimir announced that ground penetrating radar (GPR) had detected the remains of 215 children who had died at the Kamloops Indian Residential School (KIRS) under sinister circumstances. More shocking still, Chief Casimir claimed that children as young as six had been awakened in the middle of the night to secretly bury these children in the apple orchard. The nation was thrown into a frenzy of self-flagellation. The Prime Minister had the flag lowered – where it stayed for six months – politicians openly wept, orange shirts were worn, monuments of small shoes appeared spontaneously all across Canada, churches were burned and vandalized, condemnations were issued by the Pope and world leaders, and lawyers immediately filed a complaint with the International Criminal Court at the Hague. The world was subsequently told by the media and Indigenous leaders that the human remains in Kamloops represented only a small number of thousands of such burials at former residential schools across Canada, and the federal government committed $321 million to GPR searches for unmarked graves. Yet strangely, to date no actual proof of human remains has been found anywhere. Over the course of the past year, hundreds of negative articles were written in which Chief Casimir’s claim that the remains of 215 children had been discovered at Kamloops were accepted as fact. Additional criminal acts were alleged. In the CBC’s Fifth Estateprogram in January, the school was described as a place of horror where children mysteriously went missing, bodies were seen hanging in barns, children were sexually abused, and burials took place at night. But is any of this true, and if so, where is the evidence? It is noteworthy that none of these hundreds of articles referred to the fact that many accomplished people who attended, or taught at, the Kamloops Indian Residential School made no reference to anything dark or evil, much less murderous. Len Marchand, for example, the first status Indian federal cabinet minister, transferred to KIRS by his own choice in 1949. In his autobiography he explicitly refused to say anything negative about the school, his only complaint being that the potatoes were watery. Three Indigenous teachers – Joe Stanley Michel, who graduated from KIRS, Benjamin Paul, and Mabel Caron – were on staff in 1962 when the CBC filmed a documentary at the Kamloops school, and none complained of anything untoward, either then or later. By 1973, half the staff at KIRS was Indigenous, and none of these Indigenous staff members complained of anything untoward at the school, neither then nor later. It is also noteworthy that none of these hundreds of articles mention any of the positive aspects of life at KIRS, including sports teams, musical and dance groups, picnics, socials, parties, Saturday night dances, and the spacious and comfortable student hostel built in 1962 – all while these alleged secret nighttime burials were taking place. Nor do any of these articles mention the fact that at that time the school had an impressive outdoor swimming pool, as shown in the photograph at the head of this article. Kamloops was one of at least three British Columbia residential schools with swimming pools. According to an announcement in the Indian Record in June 1959, the Kamloops pool was one hundred feet long, and was thus at least as large as the Centennial Pool built for the residents of Kamloops in 1958. Sports teams, parties, and swimming pools don’t support the narrative about residential schools that today fills print and social media spaces – namely that these schools were places of horror where children were starved, abused, murdered, and secretly buried. That is in large part because historical documents portraying the positive side of residential school life have been largely suppressed. The most revealing of these documents are the chronicles kept by the orders of Sisters who taught, nursed, and cared for the children, and the codices of the Oblate priests who administered the schools and were largely responsible for preserving Indigenous languages in Canada. These historical documents do not support the story of misery, abuse, neglect and murder now almost exclusively told, and for that reason have been suppressed and treated as though they do not exist, even though the National Centre for Truth and Reconiliation (NCTR) has had almost all of them in its possession for years. Similarly, photographs of children at residential schools do not support the narrative of misery, abuse, neglect and murder. Most of these old photographs show children who look happy, healthy and well nourished, and often depict them enjoying a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. The Sisters’ chronicles and the old photographs produce cognitive dissonance – how could such allegedly abused, neglected and malnourished children appear to be so healthy and happy? When looking at these old photographs, and in particular the photograph of the Kamloops swimming pool, Canadians might want to reflect on the stories they have been told about the horrors of residential schools and ask themselves whether they have been told the truth. That brings us back to the question of whether the May 27, 2021 announcement by Chief Casimir that the remains of 215 children had been found at Kamloops is true. There is a way to find out, and Chief Manny Jules promised it would be done. On the CBC’s Fifth Estateprogram in January Chief Manny Jules promised that the alleged burial site in the old apple orchard in Kamloops would be excavated. That promise has not been kept, and until that promise is kept, and excavation takes place, it cannot be said that the human remains of 215 children were actually found last May. In fact, there is no evidence to support the claim that children secretly died or were killed and buried in the old apple orchard. There are no names associated with these allegedly missing children, no lists of children who had gone missing or unaccounted for, no parents or relatives who claim that their child was among the 215. Who are the 215 children allegedly buried there? No one has the slightest idea. Not one of the many Indian Bands who sent children to the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, including the Kamloops Band itself, has ever come forward with the name of a single child who allegedly went to the school and never returned, and for whom the Band has been looking ever since. Not one. There is thus absolutely no evidence of any child who attended KIRS from any Band in BC actually having gone missing, much less that any child was murdered and secretly buried in the apple orchard by six year olds. That tale appears to be the figment of overactive imaginations. There is one way to solve this perplexing issue once and for all. An excavation, as Chief Manny Jules promised. Excavation would bring clarity to the situation, it would help bring closure to First Nations people grieving and struggling with the situation, and it could help our country heal. https://tnc.news/2022/05/19/guest-op-ed-one-year-later-there-is-still-no-evidence-of-unmarked-graves-or-missing-children-at-former-residential-schools/?fbclid=IwAR2h5iwVTbaPdRl375T38zY-niMPNZ7eDwRdiIe8LWxosVW-Qvy34cVG_2c
    2 points
  9. Reuters Daily Briefing Oklahoma lawmakers gave final approval to a bill that would ban nearly all abortions and would allow private citizens to sue anyone who helps women terminate a pregnancy. We examine the penalties abortion providers could face in a post-Roe world and whether the laws could apply to women seeking abortions.
    2 points
  10. On the 320 we didn't have to eat off the log book on our laps and we we didn't have to worry about breaking our knee cap when we trimmed the aircraft. That should be enough right there, although I'll have to admit the bean counters really didn't care.
    1 point
  11. Has politician Jagmeet Singh gone positively neo-fascist? The NDP Partyleader, who recently helped lock Justin Trudeau into office for three more years, believes Canadians should be forced to receive Covid vaccinations. As in– right now. “We absolutely believe that there needs to be mandatory vaccines.” As for non-compliant citizens, Mr. Singhrecommends these people be punished: “There would be consequences for those who are not able to or not willing to do that, and we can look at what those consequences are.” Ironic it is that Marina Glogovac, new CEO of uber-leftist Toronto Star, recently stated that she considers vaccine passports to be “akin to communism.” What a “progressive” political leader we have in Jagmeet Singh. Mandated vaccines are an affront to individual freedoms for Canadians. The concept flies in the face of our civil rights, in particular the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Jagmeet Singh doesn’t care. Like ideological siamese twin Justin Trudeau, the NDP leader only cares about what he personally believes to be true. The “vast majority of Canadians would support mandatory vaccines, at least for some sectors of society, and consequences for those who don’t comply with the order.” Canadians are in favour of medical fascism, are we? The degree to which Singh shares psychological traits not only with Justin Trudeau– but also Pierre Trudeau— is astounding. Presumption is one thing. When applied to these men, it progresses to the pathological.
    1 point
  12. Coke vs Pepsi, JPEG vs RAW, creation vs evolution...these discussions never resolve. How about...has anyone got an example of what type of flying/mission where one type would do better than the other. For example, 737-200 gravel ops.
    1 point
  13. Zero-emissions study leaves out North over modelling issues (cabinradio.ca) Zero-emissions study leaves out North over modelling issues Published: May 26, 2022 at 6:34amOLLIE WILLIAMS A major study by the David Suzuki Foundation that states “100-percent zero-emissions electricity is possible in Canada by 2035” left out the North as its model would not work there. A wind turbine. Patrick Finnegan/Flickr The foundation’s report – Shifting Power: Zero-Emissions Electricity Across Canada by 2035 – was published on Wednesday. Using mostly wind or solar power in a decade’s time is possible, affordable and would be reliable, the report asserts. Reaching a net-zero electricity grid by 2035 has been a stated goal of the federal government since Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced it at the COP26 climate conference. The David Suzuki Foundation report is one of the first to contemplate in detail how that might be achieved. However, both the federal target and this week’s report dance around a problem: the North. The federal target’s wording refers to “achieving a net-zero electricity grid,” a phrase that could be taken to leave out the NWT, which isn’t on the Canada-wide grid, has no real grid of its own and, in many communities, relies heavily on diesel generation. As for the report, while its title and many of its statements suggest the entirety of Canada is being considered, no northern territory is mentioned once in its 78 pages. Stephen Thomas, who authored the report alongside Tom Green, acknowledged the targets stated in the report exclude the territories – though Thomas did say he believed “nearly-zero emissions electricity by 2035 is also possible in the North.” Thomas said the report focused only on the 10 southern provinces “because that’s what our model could do.” “We use an electricity system model that is really good at digging into what’s happening in the electricity system across thousands of grid points, across Canada. But that only models the connected grid between the 10 provinces south of 60,” he told Cabin Radio. “That’s not at all to say that the energy transition, energy sovereignty, and specific solutions to these problems aren’t absolutely crucial in the North as well. We just think that’s a different problem to solve.” The foundation is not planning any separate report on northern Canadian electricity generation. Thomas said “others already are doing great work in thinking about and addressing the energy transition in the North … We partner with others and support their work, but we don’t have plans to do a similar report.” Target requires huge shift to wind Even in the south, the foundation declared, “the scale of transformation is daunting” to reach zero-emissions electricity across 10 provinces in 13 years’ time. “It would require an average annual build-out of wind and solar electricity projects never before seen in Canada,” the foundation stated, including a graph that shows wind generation multiplying by 10 – from 13,000 MW in 2018 to 135,000 MW in 2035 – to meet that target. A Flourish chart “An average of more than 2,200 new four-MW wind turbines would be installed every year and more than 160 new 10-MW solar farms would be built each year,” the foundation imagines in its preferred solution to Canada’s energy needs. (The NWT presently has one wind farm of note, at the Diavik diamond mine, and is in the process of erecting one wind turbine near Inuvik.) That kind of national shift would require building new wind and solar projects at five times Canada’s previous record rate, the report asserted. But the foundation argues countries like Germany are already planning to add renewable power at “an equivalent rate” to that contemplated in its report. “By 2025, the country expects to be adding 10 GW of wind annually, similar to what our modelling scenarios would require,” the foundation said of Germany. The boldest scenario presented in the report is estimated to save 200 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions annually across Canada – a thousand times the current NWT reduction target. “By 2035, we’re the first study in Canada to show that kind of target being possible,” said Thomas of the zero-emissions electricity goal. “Wind and solar are very available in Canada and they are the cheapest form of electricity. That, you can put on the grid today. Paired with the existing hydroelectricity, things like energy storage, energy efficiency, and more transmission between provinces come together to make a reliable and affordable electricity system. “We think this pathway is very possible.” The study is not exhaustive and is not presented as such. For example, offshore wind, green hydrogen, and the interplay between Canadian and US energy grids are either not modelled at all or included in rudimentary fashion. The territories aren’t the only areas ignored: any remote grid not connected to the broader Canadian grid is considered “out of scope.” The cost? $560 billion to pursue the boldest option, the foundation stated. That’s the equivalent of around 500 Taltson hydro expansions, from an NWT point of view, and the federal government has yet to find the cash for even one – though it says it’s close. Another way to look at it: the federal government expects to have an income of around $409 billion in 2022-23, so this switch would cost much more than an entire year of federal revenue. But that kind of transformative shift in investment is what’s required, the foundation and others argue, in the face of a climate crisis. Eventually, the foundation suggests, 75,000 or more clean-energy jobs would be created to replace jobs in industries that are phased out. “The federal government needs to be very clear on how this rolls out, to get to zero emissions by 2035,” Thomas said. “In terms of making this a reality in Canada,” he said, “it’s about jobs. It’s about investment in the renewable electricity sector, and it’s about policymakers coming together and collaborating.”
    1 point
  14. And Marco Mendocino will be full of misinformation and lies as he brings in more restrictions on handguns using the Texas shootings as a pretence to “keep Canadians safe”…Quebec is on board, and with the backing of the NDP, and the bloc to support the libs. Ford has said he is not interested in more laws against law abiding citizens….just get tough on criminals. We’ll see but I’m not optimistic. Meanwhile, the gangs and druggies will still carry as a sign of power and the shootings will continue.
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  15. Quote of the day: “Doug Ford doesn’t seem to care and is fighting to keep handguns legal,” Del Duca said in a statement. “He has stated multiple times that he opposes a handgun ban, even as handgun-related crimes spike in his own backyard. These brazen attacks are escalating and endangering the lives of families across Ontario — and the fear needs to end.” Instead of foolish statements, why not a side by side analysis of "handgun related crimes" perpetrated by gang members as compared to licensed IPSC Black Badge holders with registered firearms over the last 5 years.... that might be instructive for the voters who believe his nonsense. Here's Toronto's "current" most wanted list (from the police service website) that are shooting related. How many duck hunters from PEI do you suppose are in the group? And how many of these folks do you suppose are RPAL holders with registered handguns and permits to carry? Homicide #3/2022 Darriel THOMPSON Homicide #3/2022 Camarr BROWN Homicide #65/2021 Abilaziz MOHAMED Homicide #17/2021 Mohamed HASSAN Homicide #9/2020 Nadim MIAH
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  16. Hopefully it doesn't have a chip in it. Those old Harleys (with points and condensers) might soon become valuable... I'm thinking of getting a horse.
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  17. I expect there will be a very different narrative come the fall when the true value of a 'peace dividend' becomes apparent. We need a real debate about the Ukraine war Tue May 24, 2022 - The Washington Post By Katrina vanden Heuvel It’s time to challenge the orthodox view on the war in Ukraine. As Russia’s illegal and brutal assault enters its fourth month, the impact on Europe, the Global South and the world is already profound. We are witnessing the emergence of a new political/military world order. Climate action is being sidelined as reliance on fossil fuels increases; food scarcity and other resource demands are pushing prices upward and causing widespread global hunger; and the worldwide refugee crisis — with more international refugees and internally displaced people than at any time since the end of World War II — poses a massive challenge. Furthermore, the more protracted the war in Ukraine, the greater the risk of a nuclear accident or incident. And with the Biden administration’s strategy to “weaken” Russia with the scale of weapons shipments, including anti-ship missiles, and revelations of U.S. intelligence assistance to Ukraine, it is clear that the United States and NATO are in a proxy war with Russia. Shouldn’t the ramifications, perils and multifaceted costs of this proxy war be a central topic of media coverage — as well as informed analysis, discussion and debate? Yet what we have in the media and political establishment is, for the most part, a one-sided, even nonexistent, public discussion and debate. It’s as if we live with what journalist Matt Taibbi has dubbed an “intellectual no-fly zone.” Those who have departed from the orthodox line on Ukraine are regularly excluded from or marginalized — certainly rarely seen — on big corporate media. The result is that alternative and countervailing views and voices seem nonexistent. Wouldn’t it be healthy to have more diversity of views, history and context rather than “confirmation bias”? Those who speak of history and offer context about the West’s precipitating role in the Ukraine tragedy are not excusing Russia’s criminal attack. It is a measure of such thinking, and the rhetorical or intellectual no-fly zone, that prominent figures such as Noam Chomsky, University of Chicago professor John Mearsheimer and former U.S. ambassador Chas Freeman, among others, have been demonized or slurred for raising cogent arguments and providing much-needed context and history to explain the background of this war. In our fragile democracy, the cost of dissent is comparatively low. Why, then, aren’t more individuals at think tanks or in academia, media or politics challenging the orthodox U.S. political-media narrative? Is it not worth asking whether sending ever-more weapons to the Ukrainians is the wisest course? Is it too much to ask for more questioning and discussion about how best to diminish the danger of nuclear conflict? Why are nonconformists smeared for noting, even bolstered with reputable facts and history, the role of nationalist, far-right and, yes, neo-Nazi forces in Ukraine? Fascist or neo-Nazi revivalism is a toxic factor in many countries today, from European nations to the United States. Why is Ukraine’s history too often ignored, even denied? Meanwhile, as a former Marine Corps general noted, “War is a racket.” U.S. weapons conglomerates are lining up to feed at the trough. Before the war ends, many Ukrainians and Russians will die while Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman make fortunes. At the same time, network and cable news is replete with pundits and “experts” — or more accurately, military officials turned consultants — whose current jobs and clients are not disclosed to viewers. What is barely reflected on our TVs or Internet screens, or in Congress, are alternate views — voices of restraint, who disagree with the tendency to see compromise in negotiations as appeasement, who seek persistent and tough diplomacy to attain an effective cease-fire and a negotiated resolution, one designed to ensure that Ukraine emerges as a sovereign, independent, reconstructed and prosperous country. “Tell me how this ends,” Gen. David Petraeus asked Post writer Rick Atkinson a few months into the nearly decade-long Iraq War. Bringing this current war to an end will demand new thinking and challenges to the orthodoxies of this time. As the venerable American journalist Walter Lippmann once observed, “When all think alike, no one thinks very much.”
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  19. The monkey to worry about is called stupidity. Viruses can be beaten eventually ” Real Time” host Bill Maher unloaded on the strident pro-transgender movement in a Friday night rant that once again underscored the liberal personality’s penchant for calling out the left’s sacred cows. While praising tolerance for adults who reject their biological gender, Maher questioned why so many children seem to be getting encouraged to become trans and said it should be okay to ask questions about the relatively new social phenomenon. “If something about the human race is changing at a previously unprecedented rate, we have to at least discuss it,” Maher said. “Broken down over time, the LGBT population of America seems to be roughly doubling every generation.” https://www.dailywire.com/news/all-the-babies-are-in-the-wrong-bodies-bill-maher-questions-trans-explosion-in-epic-rant?utm_campaign=dw_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=housefile&utm_content=non_member
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  20. Leaflets Over Havana – How Brothers to the Rescue Papered Havana 25 views May 23, 2022 On January 13, 1995, the afternoon skies over Havana were cloudy and strong northernly winds were blowing. When Cubans looked up, they saw thousands of leaflets falling out of the clouds into the heart of the city. Yet no plane could be heard, nor any seen, and Cuban air defense radars detected nothing. How had it been done? It was a mystery. From the steps of the capital building to Old Havana, Plaza Vieja and the Plaza De La Revolucion, leaflets dropped by the non-profit search and rescue group, Brothers to the Rescue, had papered much of the city.
    1 point
  21. Same old story on Indigenous spending Calgary Sun 22 May 2022 A new report by Canada's independent, non-partisan Parliamentary Budget Officer says that while the Trudeau government is spending more on Indigenous services than ever before, it's accomplishing less. “Over the 2015-16 to 2022-23 period, there has been a significant increase in the amount of financial resources allocated to providing Indigenous Services,” Yves Giroux said in the report, while noting the increase “did not result in a commensurate increase in the ability of the organizations to achieve the targets they had set for themselves.” In fact, “the ability of the organizations to achieve the targets ... has declined.” Giroux's findings are further evidence — as if taxpayers needed more — that the federal template for spending on Indigenous issues is broken. In 2017, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau split the Indigenous and Northern Affairs ministry into two separate departments — Crown - Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada and Indigenous Services Canada, to better deliver services to Indigenous people. The government has also increased annual spending on Indigenous issues by 115% since coming into office — from $11.4 billion in 2015 to $24.5 billion last year. But Giroux found that five years after the administrative shakeup, the two new federal bureaucracies aren't meeting their own targets for improving the lives of Canada's Indigenous people, known as departmental results indicators (DRIS). “They cannot meet their own targets, which is surprising,” Giroux told APTN News, adding they're also failing to keep their targets consistent over time. Some have no completion dates, while in other cases, new targets have been created before the previous ones were met. “Some targets are very well known — the number of long-time boil water advisories for water — others are less well known,” Giroux said, such as the number of people on First Nations reserves who describe themselves as in good health, where the government is failing to meet its own targets. He said of 42 performance targets set by Indigenous Services only “a quarter or less of the results are consistent with the targets the department set.” Giroux credited the government with increasing the number of targets and said while its increases in funding have been well-intentioned, the Indigenous bureaucracy has had trouble matching spending increases with assessing its performance on how it spends the money.
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  22. Sounds very similar to my first landing on the mighty Metro. I think the divots can still be found on the button of 36 in YWG.
    1 point
  23. Hello WD......Yes sir, you guys at WD will maintain the WD brand and carry on as usual and we will have two separate airlines under the Canadian Airlines International banner.......and won't we have fun.....????
    1 point
  24. I guess those of us who were born when the earth was cooling , got through school, took up flying for decades, and never heard the word "depression" in the present context were pretty lucky. I had come off jets and was on the Cosmo, (CV580), in Trenton and was not fully aware that when you retarded the thrust levers prior to flaring you had 16 speed brakes out on the wings so my first "arrival" was rather hard. I tried to make light of it by saying " that must have left a small "depression" on the runway " to which my instructor replied, "more than likely a crater".
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  25. SPECI CYOW 211952Z 28038G65KT 1/4SM R07/P6000FT/U R32/4000VP6000FT/D +TSRA OVC050CB 20/17 A2992 RMK RA5CB3 NOTE WIND SPEED PRESRR SL P135 DENSITY ALT 1100FT= WOW! Radar showed local tops >50,000'
    1 point
  26. My point is not that the courts failed to convict, but rather the behaviour of our new Canadian father …… still having trouble adjusting to his new countries’ values!
    1 point
  27. I'm just shaking my head reading this.... unbelievable.
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  28. Trudeau lying again!! “ This week it was interim police chief in Ottawa Steve Bell who said 'no it wasn't me, no I never asked for that.’ So if they didn't ask for it, and the RCMP didn't ask for it, the obvious implication is that cabinet made that up." PODCAST: @ 12:20 The Emergencies Act. https://ottawa.citynews.ca/all-audio/the-rob-snow-show/podcast-the-rob-snow-show-for-may-20-2022-5391522
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. Colonel Miller was the Base Commander when I was on course in Moose Jaw. His son was on my course. Both super nice people! Sad to see such an accomplished flyer hang up the keys, but nice that he did it on his own terms and with such a classy gesture to boot. Funny story… When I arrived in YMJ for pilot training I had already been issued my new blue uniform because I was in YOW when DND began switching back to distinctive colours for each branch of the service. Only Colonel Miller and I had the new uniform. The Base CWO was p!ssed off because he still had to wear green! There was a lot of “what should we do about this” discussions, but finally it all fizzled out. Thankfully, by the time graduation rolled around, we all had our blues and looked good marching around the parade square. Well, as good as pilots can look on a parade square.
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  31. https://video.foxnews.com/v/6306562232112#sp=show-clips Regardless of what you think happened, take a moment and consider the power of NOT reporting stories that DON'T fit the narrative. True or false, right or wrong (and it all remains to be seen IMO), without the likes of FOX and Rebel news, none of this would even be in the public domain. I'm not judging the veracity of the information or even drawing conclusions yet... but the point is simply that all the information required to draw any conclusions at all would be deliberately buried without them. Liberals should take a moment and consider that the tactics they currently employ can also be employed against them at some point in the future. It's not about what side you happen to be on either.... the unholy trinity always endangers democracy. While nothing in my experience suggests otherwise, I patiently await examples that serve to prove my assertion wrong. Can anyone provide an example where the alignment between national governments, national media outlets, and national security forces has proved beneficial to the freedoms and rights of citizens so afflicted.
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  32. Hi, Kip - here's a graph for your time period. Nothing like the steep spike in mogas last few months, BUT - Here's a 1-year graph. Trend's definitely been up. The prices seem low, so I'm assuming it's airline contract prices, which are substantially lower than public retail. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Prices: U.S. Gulf Coast (WJFUELUSGULF) | FRED | St. Louis Fed (stlouisfed.org) Cheers, IFG p.s. I was looking into retail avgas prices several months ago in US, and they ranged north and south of $5/gal between ON & FL, self-serve at smaller airports (I think mogas was running mid-ish 2's?). If they're only $6-7 now, the increase % is definitely less than mogas -
    1 point
  33. Waddell's Wagon, created to train pilots to taxi in the 747 before prototypes were completed.
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  34. Canada to ban China's Huawei Technologies from 5G networks, sources say 9m ago FollowView Profile React11 Comments| 7 © Provided by The Canadian Press OTTAWA — Senior government officials say the Liberals have decided to ban Chinese vendor Huawei Technologies from Canada's long-awaited blueprint for next-generation mobile networks. The development of 5G, or fifth-generation, networks will give people speedier online connections and provide vast data capacity to meet ravenous demand as more and more things link to the internet and innovations such as autonomous vehicles emerge. The Opposition Conservatives and other critics have long pressed the Liberals to deny Huawei a role in building the country's 5G infrastructure, saying it would allow Beijing to spy on Canadians more easily. Some say Huawei's participation could give it access to an array of digital information gleaned from how, when and where Canadian customers use internet-connected devices. In turn, the theory goes, Chinese security agencies could force the company to hand over the personal information. Three of Canada's partners in the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing alliance — the United States, Britain and Australia — have taken decisive steps to curb the use of Huawei gear in their countries' respective 5G networks. This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 19, 2022. The Canadian Press
    1 point
  35. Unfortunately I think you are correct. How Canada gets past this destructive ideology the country is hooked on is a mystery left for people a lot smarter than me to figure out. I have but one vote and imo I use it wisely, not to necessarily benefit me personally but for the country as a whole.
    1 point
  36. Life in Canada is more expensive than ever – inflation is at a 31-year high, gas prices are out of control and the cost of goods and services continues to increase. As it looks more likely Canada is heading into a recession, it doesn’t seem like our politicians care as they continue to spend on frivolous and expensive programs and refuse to reduce spending or taxes. On this episode of the Candice Malcolm Show, Candice is joined by Michael Campbell, the host of Mike’s Money Talks podcast to discuss Canada’s precarious economic situation. Candice and Mike discuss the root causes of Canada’s sky-high prices, the fact that almost half of Canadians are $200 away from insolvency and what Canadians can do to hunker down and make smart financial decisions.
    1 point
  37. Now that's a crop duster!
    1 point
  38. Dem witness tells House committee men can get pregnant, have abortions https://www.foxnews.com/politics/house-committee-witness-men-get-pregnant-have-abortions To my knowledge, not a single Demonrat (supporting the urban chicken fad) is feeding laying mash to roosters and expecting eggs. When I see that happening, I'll believe they believe what they say they might maybe think they believe. This lack of consistency applies to the greenies as well, they should be celebrating the record high gas prices but it appears they aren't. To achieve the goals they say they want to achieve, not only do we need significantly higher energy prices, we need to shut down entire sectors of the economy that exceed anything we saw during the covid lockdowns. Those were just a warmup for what's required. Here's a homework assignment that will make you thirsty: find a raving liberal and ask them about the eggs from roosters thing. Then ask them what portions of the economy they want to shut down. I've been unable to find one who will answer (what should be) the most basic of questions. There's only 7 1/2 years to go, when do they plan to start thinking about it? LOL, they won't even answer that.... Here's another little exercise for ya: there are some 1.4 million people in the US who identify as transgender. Given the push toward calling mothers "birthing people" and putting menstrual products in boys washrooms (public schools), how many men (meaning transgender women) have actually given birth... for easy figuring we'll just narrow it down to the last 200 years? I'd be interested in the average number per year expressed as a percentage of the entire population under 40 (since everyone in that demographic is a contender now). Given the policy initiatives and changes in terminology, it should be statistically significant. I looked but couldn't find any numbers.
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  39. Rupa Subramanya: Liberals slow to realize vaccine mandates are past their best by date Time for the Trudeau government to end its vaccine mandate for federal employees 70 percenters will tell you it's about the science and those arguing against the mandates have fallen into the trap of using science as a counter argument... It's not even about that IMO. It can't happen until the last of the military / RCMP administrative releases are processed and those folks are fired. There may be a few federal civil service members still hanging on as well (not sure about them). Once the people who need to be fired are gone, they will relax the mandates.... I can't imagine it being before that.
    1 point
  40. Canadian crews on the ground, in the air reach milestone transporting aid to war-torn Ukraine Airlift operation has flown about 80 missions between Scotland and Poland Chris Brown · CBC News · Posted: May 17, 2022 7:46 PM ET | Last Updated: May 17 An aircrew from Canadian Forces Base Trenton's 8 Wing pilot a C130-J Hercules aircraft to Poland from Prestwick, Scotland, for the next part of a journey transporting aid to Ukraine. (Chris Brown/CBC) As the massive rear door of the Canadian C-17 Globemaster lowered to the runway in rainy Prestwick, Scotland, members of Canadian Forces Base Trenton's 8 Wing tactical airlift detachment pounced. Within minutes, uniformed soldiers had unloaded pallets filled with what Canada's military euphemistically refers to as "lethal" and "non-lethal" aid — until one heavy load stopped them in their tracks. It took at least 10 soldiers, a forklift and a lot of grunting and groaning before the secretive, heavy pallet was able to be transferred onto a trailer and towed up to a waiting C130-J Hercules for the next part of the journey to Ukraine. CBC News was given unusual access this week to the operations of 8 Wing as aid destined for Ukraine was transported into Poland. Reporting on what was in the cargo wasn't permitted — other than it was for both humanitarian and military purposes — but whatever was wrapped up tightly on the giant pallet stood out for the effort required to load it onboard. A Royal Canadian Air Force C-17 Globemaster is shown on the runway in Prestwick, Scotland, about 45 minutes from Glasgow, this week. The aircraft had been filled with 'lethal' and 'non-lethal' aid to assist Ukraine in its war with Russia. (Chris Brown/CBC) Canada has said publicly that it is sending Ukraine four M777 howitzers, Carl Gustaf recoilless rifles, M72 Light Anti-tank Weapons (LAWs) and 7,500 hand grenades, along with different varieties of ammunition. The military aid is part of a $1.2-billion package the Trudeau government has approved to help Ukraine respond to Russia's Feb. 24 invasion. "Everyone is watching the news, so we know what is going on. We are proud to help Ukraine," said Sgt. Jimmy Noel, one of 30 members of the Royal Canadian Air Force's 436 Transport Squadron that has set up a temporary base at the Prestwick airport, about 45 minutes from Glasgow. A team from the RCAF's 429 Transport Squadron begins to transfer humanitarian and military aid from the large Globemaster aircraft to the smaller Hercules. (Chris Brown/CBC) Two J-class Hercules military transport aircraft have been taking turns doing the runs into Poland using two aircrews. "Since we got here at the beginning of March, we've flown approximately 80 missions," said Maj. Cam MacKay, who oversees the airlift operations at the Prestwick base. "We've moved over 900,000 kilograms, which is just over two million pounds. And we fly pretty regularly. This is really our bread and butter." A Canadian C-17 Globemaster aircraft sits in the foreground and a C130-J Hercules is shown in the rear on the tarmac at Prestwick's airport. (Chris Brown/CBC) Aid transported from Scotland to Poland Canadian military pilots are legally allowed to fly 120 hours a month — and on the busy Hercules missions of late, they have usually come close to that. The flight from Prestwick to their destination in Poland takes about three and a half hours and is mostly uneventful, although the descent is an unusually long and gradual one. Trudeau says Canada is sending artillery to Ukraine. Here's what that could mean The airport used as a base by NATO forces, which CBC News has been asked not to name, is relatively close to the Ukrainian border, and the skies around the airport contain restricted airspace — forcing incoming flights to fly lower than usual as they come in on their approach. Open-source flight tracking sites on the internet often show NATO reconnaissance aircraft flying through the airspace, monitoring activity in Ukraine. Maj. Cam MacKay oversees airlift operations at the Prestwick base. 'We've moved over 900,000 kilograms, which is just over two million pounds. And we fly pretty regularly,' he said. (Chris Brown/CBC) As a hub for incoming aid to Ukraine, the airspace in eastern Poland is heavily guarded, and the United States has said publicly that it has installed state-of-the-art Patriot anti-missile systems in the region. Russian officials have warned that it considers North Atlantic Treaty Organization flights and convoys carrying arms to Ukraine as "legitimate targets," but none have ever been attacked, and on the flight deck of the Hercules, MacKay said he believes the missions are safe. Canada prepping more aid as Ukraine war enters what former U.S. defence secretary calls 'critical' phase "I don't really think about it. The government of Canada sent us here to do a job, and we're very proud to be doing that job. And we don't really think about the other piece," he said. In Poland, an American ground crew met the Canadian plane and quickly unloaded the pallets from the rear of the Hercules — even the extremely heavy one was removed easily with the heavy-lift equipment at the NATO base. Canadian military personnel have dubbed their temporary home in Scotland as CFB Prestwick. (Chris Brown/CBC) The ground stop lasted less than 30 minutes before the Hercules crew was back in the air again, heading to Brussels to prepare for another transport the following day. "There's no fixed end date on the operation right now," MacKay said. "That doesn't mean it's going to go on indefinitely, but we'll start rotating our personnel crews. We're just hearing very positive feedback."
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  41. Hi again, Airband & Vsplat - First read, you're correct, the bill does not seem to propose the sort of broad pension "protection" I commented about. Altho' not finding anything in a quick look at info about this bill, I quote the following from Ms. Gladu in HoC: This IS the kind of thing I worry about. As for what I see in the bill (so far!), altho' introduced by a CPC member as a private bill, it's pretty bipartisan (how long will that last?), incorporating & building on previous efforts by members of all parties. There may be some 'careful what you ask for' tripwires, but that weed-diving is a whole other discussion. Editing my post. Cheers, IFG p.s. More I think about it, I shoulda left my 1st post (above) alone
    1 point
  42. That's such an Irish thing to say - I gotta go work there just for the punchlines.
    1 point
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