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  1. Mitch; Much has changed in terms of the sophistication of flight planning systems, historical fuel burn, wind modelling and route analysis. When I started flying the big iron, it was common to see 2 to 5% errors in the planned fuel burn. These days, flight plans are virtually bang on the great majority of the time. That in itself has helped build confidence among most pilots. But like any other type of automation, it’s still not perfect. No operation should question a captain who can reasonably justify fuel that the dispatcher didn’t include in the flight plan. Maybe they missed a hitch in the forecast, or a NOTAM that hints at delays enroute or for arrival. If you point it out calmly and without accusing them of missing something, dispatchers will usually see your point and agree with the adjustment. But taking extra “just because” is thinking from a time when flight plans were less accurate and there was a lot less information and support available to flight crews. Bottom line is carrying extra fuel costs money and increases our carbon footprint - 4% per hour flown is what it costs for extra fuel carried (on average). As a guy who supports taking it easy on our planet, you understand that cutting back on our fuel consumption where it’s safe to do so is also a good thing for the environment.
    5 points
  2. 87-year-old pilot ends elite flying career with cross-country flight to N.B. George Miller's 68-year career at the controls ended at the airport that started it all Shane Fowler · CBC News · Posted: May 19, 2022 7:00 AM AT | Last Updated: 4 hours ago After flying for nearly 70 years, George Miller descended from the skies one last time to land in New Brunswick. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) "Nobody's flown that low at this airport in 20 years." That quip came from a Miramichi-Chatham Airport employee about 87-year-old George Miller's visit in his 1940s-era Ryan Navion. Roaring by the eastern New Brunswick airport under a blazing sun, the Navion's unpainted silver fuselage reflected so much sunlight it stung the eyes. The plane has a 1950s sci-fi movie spaceship vibe, from back when the future was made of chrome. WATCH | George Miller's emotional final flight Pilot's emotional final flight after 7 decades of flying 7 hours ago Duration6:45 George Miller's storied career culminates with a flight across Canada and a parked piece of history. Aircraft fanatics would recognize its fighter plane lineage. Designed by the same company that built the legendary Second World War P-51 Mustang, the Navion emits a throaty growl as it flies by. They don't make planes like this anymore. And on this spring afternoon, the Navion came out of the sky for the last time, touching down at the Miramichi-Chatham Airport. It will never fly again. Neither will its pilot. Meet Miller "I just love that airplane," said George Miller. "And I know that it'll be hard to finally take the last look at it." "It's a real gut-wrencher to give it up." After spending 68 years in the air, George Miller is saying goodbye to flying and goodbye to his Navion, flying it across Canada to donate it to a New Brunswick museum. Born on Fogo Island off Newfoundland's north shore in 1935, Miller recalls being enraptured by a float plane delivering supplies to the island when he was just six years old. On his 18th birthday, he signed up with the RCAF. For the next 35 years he was a fighter pilot. And it was this little New Brunswick airport that gave him his start. 'A crazy career' In his early air force days, Miller says the first transonic fighter jets, planes capable of flying as fast as the sound barrier, were just coming into service. He put in a request to be trained to fly them. To this day, he still can't believe it was granted. Miller moved to New Brunswick and started training to fly CF-86 Sabre fighter planes, an aircraft first flown against Russian MiG's in the Korean War. The airport was a military hub then, much bigger than the humble airstrip it is today. Built immediately after the Second World War, Miller's Navion is a four-seater plane that he's been flying for the last 20 years. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) "This was our major, major fighter base, like Cold Lake is right now in Alberta," said Miller. "It's part of my soul, really, because I grew up with it," said Miller of the Miramichi-Chatham Airport. "I was so involved with, and so engrossed with the whole fighter business and the air force." Miller's first tour in 1955 was flying Sabres in Germany in the early years of the Cold War. "Basically, that was to counter the impending Russian threat because the Russians … they really had plans on moving into Europe and the threat was real," said Miller. "And then, of course, we'd be in the Third World War." Nuclear era He eventually upgraded to the Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, a jet capable of flying at twice the speed of sound. It was also capable of nuclear strikes, carrying US-supplied nuclear weapons. After piloting the Starfighters in Germany, Miller was transferred to Sardinia, Italy where he trained Canadian pilots on transporting and deploying nuclear weapons. Miller ran a sea survival school, training pilots who ejected or parachuted over water how to survive. Miller's Navion at the Miramichi-Chatham airport. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) He also spent time in the 1970s in Kingston, Ont., as the director of the Air Force Staff College, and then was sent to Egypt when that country was entering into peace talks with Israel. "That was an amazing time in my career … and they gave me one year of intensive Arabic language training, so I became bilingual in Arabic … and I had some crazy missions across the 'no man's land.' "I was often in the centre of it, trying to get intelligence for the Canadian government," said Miller. After stints in Israel and Sudan, Miller retired after 35 years in the RCAF. "That was a crazy career," he said. Hawks and Snowbirds Miller was also part of both of Canada's high-flying air force stunt squads. His talent flying those first Sabres landed him a spot on the 1962 Golden Hawks squad. The Golden Hawks would showcase high-speed manoeuvres and stunts at airshows, wowing crowds across the country. Miller, far right, was a member of the Golden Hawks, Canada's first national military aerobatic team, predating the Snowbirds. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) In 1973, he went to Moose Jaw, Sask., to help fashion the newly formed Snowbirds flight squadron into a national aerobatic team. The Snowbirds still perform across Canada today. Miller eventually formed his own flying aerobatic team after retirement, the Fraser Blues, flying alongside his son, putting on shows throughout British Columbia. WATCH | George Miller shows off his 1940s-era Ryan Navion one last time 1947 Ryan Navion aircraft walkaround 7 hours ago Duration10:43 Pilot George Miller shows off his Ryan Navion before donating it to the New Brunswick Aviation Museum. Miller's plane for those shows was the Navion. But despite still being in excellent health, this was the year to give up flying, he said. "I feel very capable of flying, there's no problem there," he said. "But I think it's good to be sensible. "I've done enough 'hundred-dollar hamburger' type trips, where you spend a hundred dollars in gas for a 15-dollar hamburger." Donating history When Miller started selling his beloved Navion, he spoke to Kevin Anderson, the executive director and founder of the New Brunswick Aviation Museum. Anderson has been working since 2013 to create a museum showcasing the province's aviation history. The current museum collection sits in a hanger off the tarmac at the Miramichi–Chatham airport. It already includes George Miller's flight suits from both the Golden Hawks and Snowbirds. It will now also include the Navion. Kevin Anderson, executive director and the founder of the New Brunswick Aviation Museum, is grateful for Miller's donated plane. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) Miller decided to cancel the sale of his plane and donate it to the fledging museum. "Well, I had a pretty big smile on, I'll say that much," said Anderson. "The reason that it was important for us to get it is that with the Golden Hawks being formed here in 1959 they were a huge part of Canada's aerobatic team history," said Anderson. This concept art is for the New Brunswick Aviation Museum that Anderson says is on track to be built in the coming years. It will house Miller's donated Navion. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) Trip of a lifetime Miller decided to deliver the Navion to New Brunswick himself, making the final flight from his home in Langley, B.C. His plan was to wait for good weather in early summer to fly across the country one last time. But on May 1, as he was going to bed, he checked the weather on his phone. He was shocked to find the perfect tailwind flowing across Canada. "I couldn't believe it," said Miller. "It was from coast to coast. This was a Sunday, and I said, 'I'm leaving Monday,' and I did." The perfect co-pilot But at 87, Miller knew he couldn't complete the trip alone. With any older plane, maintenance and upkeep is a constant variable, so he'd need someone who wasn't just along for the ride. He chose 27-year-old engineer Freya Inkster. "She's an absolutely wonderful maintenance engineer," said Miller. A pilot herself, she maintains about 30 to 40 airplanes, including Miller's, and said she was honoured when he asked her to help him make his final flight. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/the-final-flight-of-george-miller-1.6451216 Freya Inkster has been the Navion's maintenance engineer in Langley, B.C., for years. She maintained the plane on Miller's final flight. (Shane Fowler/CBC News) A good thing too. About halfway through the trip the Navion started having engine troubles and had to land in Kenora, Ont. "I was thinking, 'Please don't be a cylinder,' but it was a cylinder," said Inkster. She ended up having to replace it, shipping in a rebuilt one they luckily had back in Langley. The rest of the flight went by without incident. "This one is special," said Inkster. "Every single Navion is different, it doesn't matter if they were from the same year, every one is different." Final landing Last Thursday, after nearly seven decades of flying, Miller descended out of the sky for the final time. To his surprise, two fire trucks arched streams of water across the runway as a welcome. After an emotional hug with Anderson, Miller handed him the keys to his plane. "An end of an era, that's for sure," said Miller. "I'm hoping that when the new museum is open, I'll come back here, and I'll take Freya with me, and come back and see it, and that will be the last time I will see it." Miller with his Navion. (Shane Fowler/CBC News)
    3 points
  3. Special Bulletin May 9, 2022 Protect our Pensions We are asking for your support to help protect your pension! You may recall that in March, you received a bulletin from us asking for your support to sign a petition relating to the protection of Canadian pensions. The new email initiative described below is related, and is the next step following that petition. Your pension may be well funded now, but that doesn’t mean that your pension is secure for the long term. We all count on our pensions for decades of retirement, and a lot can change in that time. During the 2008 financial crisis, overall Canadian pension solvency dropped 30% in less than one year. Companies are most likely to file for insolvency when pension solvency is lowest. Ask yourself how a 30% reduction in pension income would impact your life! Federal Government regulations currently do not protect your pension. The Conservative Party of Canada has proposed Bill C-228 that would provide pension security in the event it is required. The next milestone is in June 2022, when the Bill goes to committee for debate. Your help is required now, to show the government that pensioners are concerned about pension protection. To help, an email will be sent, under your name, to your local MP, the Senator(s) from your province or territory, and key government ministers. Please act now!!! Click HERE and let your MP, your Senator, and the government know that vulnerable seniors are no longer acceptable collateral damage in insolvency. It’s easy!!! When you “Click HERE", you will be asked to fill in your name, email address and postal code. Once you’ve done that, PLEASE SCROLL DOWN and then click the red “Send your email now!” button. Thank you for your support in protecting our pensions! Sincerely, Air Canada Pionairs Pension Sub-Committee
    3 points
  4. Liberals appear to be having a hard time living up to their own definition of purity. Scaring off otherwise good candidates for something they said when they were 13 years old sounds like the very definition of unintended consequences to me. Makes you wonder how many of us would be able to live up to the standards now being demanded. Ironically, the very people advocating for diversity are the ones working hard to stifle it. https://nationalpost.com/news/ontario-election/sabrina-maddeaux-shamefully-cancelling-candidates-over-teenaged-facebook-posts-will-drive-gen-z-away And it's not just what you did... it's also what you didn't do. None of this applies to JT of course: https://www.foxnews.com/media/middle-schooler-sexual-harassment-accusations-pronouns-shatter-college-chances
    3 points
  5. Spotted today, May 4th....
    3 points
  6. I could be wrong but I believe the article should have stated that the increased oxygen level because of the leak caused either the cigarette or the ignition device, match/lighter to burn hotter which probably led to other fire related issues. “ Oxygen behaves differently to air, compressed air, nitrogen and other inert gases. It is very reactive. Pure oxygen, at high pressure, such as from a cylinder, can react violently with common materials such as oil and grease. Other materials may catch fire spontaneously. Nearly all materials including textiles, rubber and even metals will burn vigorously in oxygen. Even a small increase in the oxygen level in the air to 24% can create a dangerous situation. It becomes easier to start a fire, which will then burn hotter and more fiercely than in normal air. It may be almost impossible to put the fire out. A leaking valve or hose in a poorly ventilated room or confined space can quickly increase the oxygen concentration to a dangerous level. The main causes of fires and explosions when using oxygen are: ❋ oxygen enrichment from leaking equipment; ❋ use of materials not compatible with oxygen; ❋ use of oxygen in equipment not designed for oxygen service; ❋ incorrect or careless operation of oxygen equipment. https://www.esfrs.org/_resources/assets/attachment/full/0/789.pdf
    3 points
  7. Are these gents part of Trudeau's diversity and inclusion platform?
    2 points
  8. Gun control isn't the issue here... propaganda techniques are. The gun control issue is a perfect example, nothing provides better proof of its existence or a better case study in the deployment and weaponization of state created propaganda and media cooperation. If you say the same thing over and over again, aided and abetted by cooperative media outlets, you can turn a simple semiautomatic rifle with a 5 round box magazine into a military assault rifle. Freeland defends Liberals' move to ban military-style assault guns The question they will never answer is on par with asking a greenie what they want cut to hit accord targets. How did a semi-automatic rifle (without selective fire) morph into an assault rifle and is there any military in the world who uses the AR-15 and a 5 round magazine as a issued battle rifle? We know the answer here... right? Those who disagree may be interested in the 15 year old 3/4 ton truck (regular cab) I have for sale. It's a bit pricy though because the racing stripes I added have morphed it into a Ferrari. It's now a Ferrari-style racing truck. Now, consider the headlines if this "racing truck" was purchased by a deranged individual and employed as a weapon at a Canada Day gathering. Would people support a ban on Ferrari-style racing trucks because they are the weapon of choice for evil doers? The only difference between the issues here is that a clear majority of people are familiar enough with pickup trucks to recognize the lie, see the absurdity in it and call BS. No amount of repetition, false equivalency or racing stripes is going to improve the 0-60 time of the truck, so in the ad I'll just describe the acceleration to be "as expected for a vehicle of this caliber." ( sorry, best I could do at a pun)
    2 points
  9. Agreed….all the claims of genocide will make both the indigenous community and the government look disingenuous in the eyes of the world.
    2 points
  10. Thank God I had a gas generator!
    2 points
  11. The reason nothing has been dug up is that if they do dig, and the findings are not as implied, the money truck drives away. I find it amazing they can recall their oral history for thousands of years, but they can't remember if they sent a child to school, and they didn't come home.
    2 points
  12. Creaky U.S. power grid threatens progress on renewables, EVs Wildfires and other natural disasters increasingly cause dangerous outages, exposing weaknesses in the U.S. electric grid. The network faces increasing pressure from the transition to renewable power and electric cars. REUTERS/Mike Blake The nation’s transmission network, plagued by outages and increasingly severe weather, needs a trillion-dollar overhaul to handle the Biden administration’s promised clean-energy revolution. No one is taking charge of that problem. By TIM MCLAUGHLIN Filed May 12, 2022, 10 a.m. GMT After decades of struggle, the U.S. clean-energy business is booming, with soaring electric-car sales and fast growth in wind and solar power. That’s raising hopes for the fight against climate change. All this progress, however, could be derailed without a massive overhaul of America’s antiquated electric infrastructure – a task some industry experts say requires more than $2 trillion. The current network of transmission wires, substations and transformers is decaying with age and underinvestment, a condition highlighted by catastrophic failures during increasingly frequent and severe weather events. Power outages over the last six years have more than doubled in number compared to the previous six years, according to a Reuters examination of federal data. In the past two years, power systems have collapsed in Gulf Coast hurricanes, West Coast wildfires, Midwest heat waves and a Texas deep freeze, causing long and sometimes deadly outages. Compounding the problem, the seven regional grid operators in the United States are underestimating the growing threat of severe weather caused by climate change, Reuters found in a review of more than 10,000 pages of regulatory documents and operators’ public disclosures. Their risk models, used to guide transmission-network investments, consider historical weather patterns extending as far back as the 1970s. None account for scientific research documenting today’s more extreme weather and how it can disrupt grid generation, transmission and fuel supplies simultaneously. The decrepit power infrastructure of the world’s largest economy is among the biggest obstacles to expanding clean energy and combating climate change on the ambitious schedule laid out by U.S. President Joe Biden. His administration promises to eliminate or offset carbon emissions from the power sector by 2035 and from the entire U.S. economy by 2050. Such rapid clean-energy growth would pressure the nation’s grid in two ways: Widespread EV adoption will spark a huge surge in power demand; and increasing dependence on renewable power creates reliability problems on days with less sun or wind. The U.S. transmission network has seen outages double in recent years amid more frequent and severe weather events, driven by climate change. The system needs a massive upgrade to handle expected growth in clean energy and electric cars. REUTERS/Carlos Barria “Competition from renewables is being strangled without adequate and necessary upgrades to the transmission network,” said Simon Mahan, executive director of the Southern Renewable Energy Association, which represents solar and wind companies. The federal government, however, lacks the authority to push through the massive grid expansion and modernization needed to withstand wilder weather and accommodate EVs and renewable power. Under the current regulatory regime, the needed infrastructure investments are instead controlled by a Byzantine web of local, state and regional regulators who have strong political incentives to hold down spending, according to Reuters interviews with grid operators, federal and state regulators, and executives from utilities and construction firms. Paying for major grid upgrades would require these regulators to sign off on rate increases likely to spark strong opposition from consumers and local and state politicians, who are keen to keep utility bills low. In addition, utility companies often fight investments in transmission-network improvements because they can result in new connections to other regional grids that could allow rival companies to compete on their turf. With the advance of green energy, those inter-regional connections will become ever more essential to move power from far-flung solar and wind installations to population centers. The power-sharing among states and regions with often conflicting interests makes it extremely challenging to coordinate any national strategy to modernize the grid, said Alison Silverstein, an independent industry consultant and former senior adviser to the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). “The politics are a freakin’ nightmare,” she said. The FERC declined to comment for this story. FERC Commissioner Mark Christie, a Republican, acknowledged the limitations of the agency’s power over the U.S. grid in an April 21 agency meeting involving transmission planning and costs. “We can’t force states to do anything,” Christie said. The White House and Energy Department did not comment in response to detailed questions from Reuters on the Biden administration’s plans to tackle U.S. grid problems and their impact on green-energy expansion. The administration said in an April news release that it plans to offer $2.5 billion in grants for grid-modernization projects as part of Biden’s $1 trillion infrastructure package. A modernized grid, the release said, is the “linchpin” of Biden’s clean-energy agenda. Reuters reporter Tim McLaughlin explains why the aging U.S. electric grid can’t handle today’s extreme weather or the promised future of clean energy Disasters expose a broken grid Recent extreme weather events have revealed the weaknesses in U.S. power infrastructure. The New Orleans power network was doomed to fail before Hurricane Ida battered the region with winds of up to 150 mph. Built in the 1970s, when such superstorms were less common, much of the network had been engineered to withstand maximum winds of just 95 mph, according to regulatory filings reviewed by Reuters. After Ida, the blackout lasted weeks. Weather events and related fuel-supply shortages were the primary cause of the sharp rise in U.S. outages, according to data compiled by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), a grid regulator. Outages between 2015 and 2020 averaged 9,656 annually, more than double the average of 4,609 during the previous six-year period, the data examined by Reuters show. NERC does not have comparable data from previous years. That deteriorating performance coincided with a surge in natural disasters: The United States experienced 229 weather events that each caused more than $1 billion in damage between 2002 and 2021, compared with just 94 such events from 1980 to 2001, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information. (The damage totals are adjusted for inflation over the period.) Much of the New Orleans-area power grid was built in the 1970s, when superstorms were less common, and designed to withstand winds of up to 95 mph. That doomed the grid to failure when Hurricane Ida roared in last year with winds up to 150 mph, causing outages lasting for weeks. REUTERS/Adrees Latif As the weather gets wilder, the grid gets older. The U.S. Department of Energy found that 70% of U.S. transmission lines are more than 25 years old in its last network-infrastructure review in 2015. Lines typically have a 50 year lifespan. The average age of large power transformers, which handle 90% of U.S. electricity flow, is more than 40 years. Transformer malfunctions tend to escalate at about 40 years, according to research by reinsurance provider Swiss Re. Part of the problem is that the organizations charged with overseeing regional power grids don’t see these disasters coming, according to power industry consultants and a Reuters review of regulatory filings and grid operators’ public disclosures. The risk models used by all seven regional operators show they typically consider decades of historical data and assign each year’s weather an equal probability of occurring in the future. Utilities use those models to guide their grid investments, which state regulators typically must approve. Climate change has made such models obsolete, said Derek Stenclik, founder of Telos Energy, a power-analytics and engineering firm, in testimony last year to the FERC. “The use of historical weather observations,” he said, “may no longer be representative of future conditions.” The grid operators for California, the Midwest, New England, New York and Texas each told Reuters they have recently increased efforts to plan better for weather disasters, even if they have only a small chance of happening. The other two regional grid operators, the Southwest Power Pool and the PJM Interconnection, which covers a group of eastern and midwestern states, did not respond to comment requests. In early 2020, the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) relied on historical weather patterns to calculate a 0.15% chance that the state would experience blackouts during the peak summer demand season. Sweltering heat that summer, accompanied by an outbreak of some of the region’s worst recent wildfires, caused power plants and transmission equipment to fail just as homes and businesses cranked up their air conditioners, triggering some of California’s worst outages in decades. Wildfires in California, now more in common in an era of climate change, are wreaking havoc on the state’s electricity grid. REUTERS/David Swanson The fires disabled transmission systems that could have drawn power from other regions. California’s increasing reliance on renewable energy contributed to the problem: Outages spiked as solar’s contribution to the grid plunged after the sun went down. Wildfire disruptions to transmission lines have become increasingly common, but CAISO did not assess fire risks to its network. The grid operators told Reuters that fire damage is too complicated to predict. A year-and-a-half later, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) was caught off guard by a prolonged deep-freeze triggering a blackout across much of the state. Nearly 250 people died, most from hypothermia, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services. The two-week cold snap was caused by an unusual southward shift in polar airflows that some researchers have linked to climate change. ERCOT’s risk modeling before the February 2021 freeze had concluded that the state would have about 40% more power capacity than it needed for winter. It never anticipated the extended cold, and its model did now capture how utilities had failed to properly winterize their equipment. Instead, ERCOT had a massive shortfall of available power as temperatures plunged and heat demand spiked. Several million Texans were left without water and electricity for days. Jana Langley, a 38-year-old accountant from Mesquite, Texas, said her father barely survived after he “nearly froze to death and had several mini-strokes.” “We shouldn’t have to worry about people dying because someone flips off the electric switch,” she said. ERCOT said in a statement that it has implemented reforms to avoid a repeat of the blackout, including improvements to its extreme-weather risk modeling. No one in charge Upgrading the grid won’t be cheap or easy. Consultancy Marsh & McLennan estimates that more than 140,000 miles of U.S. transmission lines will need to be replaced by 2050, which alone could cost $700 billion. In all, the fixes and upgrades needed to maintain “a transmission system capable of dealing with the nation’s future needs” will cost more than $1 trillion, the 2020 study concluded. A Princeton University study the same year estimated much higher costs – about $2.4 trillion by 2050. This is a massive to-do list. And it belongs to no one in particular. FERC and NERC are the top regulators of America’s electricity system. FERC regulates power prices, while NERC enforces certain reliability standards, having issued over $2 billion in fines since a massive regional blackout in 2007. But neither has the authority to fix or upgrade the U.S. grid problems to match Washington’s green-energy ambitions. “We really don’t have anyone in charge,” said Rob Gramlich, president of Grid Strategies LLC, a Washington D.C.-based energy consulting firm. Responsibility for grid maintenance, upgrades and inter-regional connections is shared among state and local regulators, utility companies and the seven grid operators. The operators have little independent power over modernization; rather, they are simply associations whose members are largely utilities and local regulators. That system is failing because none of these players individually have the power or the responsibility to maintain the U.S. grid in the national interest, said Ari Peskoe, director of the Electricity Law Initiative at Harvard Law School. Rather, he said, they tend to prioritize provincial interests, typically utility profits or low consumer rates. Members of the Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO), which oversees transmission infrastructure for utilities in 15 U.S. states and the Canadian province of Manitoba, have been in an ongoing battle over how they will share costs of transmission expansions and improvements. The disputes have blocked progress on regional projects. RELATED CONTENT U.S. solar expansion stalled by rural land-use protests The Recycling Myth: Big Oil’s solution for plastic waste littered with failure U.S. air monitors routinely miss pollution – even refinery explosions Millions of abandoned oil wells are leaking methane, a climate menace The Public Service Commission in Louisiana, part of the MISO region, has objected in recent years to paying for new transmission lines to handle renewable generation in the northern part of the region, arguing the projects don’t benefit the state. Louisiana commission member Eric Skrmetta has repeatedly threatened to withdraw the state’s major utilities from MISO over the issue. Skrmetta and other commissioners have also defended low investment in new transmission and other infrastructure in MISO’s southern territory by arguing such projects aren’t needed to ensure supplies of low-cost energy in Louisiana. Entergy Corp, the dominant utility in MISO’s southern region, said it supports grid improvements as long as they benefit consumers. It opposes projects serving MISO’s northern territory, however, because there are limited connections between the two regions that could bring lower-cost power to Louisiana, the utility said. The company said it is also considering investments of billions of dollars to harden its infrastructure after Hurricane Ida. Entergy’s ENPAC Louisiana, the company’s political action committee in the state, has been Skrmetta’s second-largest contributor, having contributed about $34,000 during his three successful campaigns for public service commissioner, according to Louisiana campaign finance disclosures. Skrmetta did not respond to requests for comment. Trapped electrons The administration’s climate agenda would add vastly more wind and solar power to the creaky U.S. grid. That would exacerbate the transmission network’s challenges because of the inherent unreliability of these renewable sources. Unlike coal, for example, wind and sunshine can’t be stored for ready use in power emergencies. The renewable power expansion would also coincide with a massive demand surge from electric cars. The U.S. Energy Department estimates Americans will use 40% more electricity by 2050 with widespread EV adoption. Solar farms like this one in California’s Mojave Desert require massive amounts of land, forcing developers to locate them in far-flung areas. The industry’s growth is limited, however, by a lack of transmission lines and inter-regional connections needed to get the power to population centers. REUTERS/Bing Guan “We are more reliant on electricity than ever before, and our tolerance for outages is lower than ever,” said John Moura, NERC’s director of reliability assessment and system analysis. Another steep challenge: Getting renewable power to population centers. Locating massive wind farms and solar facilities near cities and suburbs brings its own set of political challenges. Solar installations, which require vastly more land than comparable fossil-fuel facilities, are already facing intense political opposition in rural America from residents who say they mar the local landscape and culture as developers buy up farmland. Locating renewable facilities in far-flung locales, in turn, requires reliable nationwide connections to move the power around the country. Right now, much of the available renewable power is trapped in various regions. In one striking example, wind power regularly meets more than 75% of the demand for electricity in the 14-state Southwest Power Pool, stretching from North Dakota to Oklahoma. But limited transmission lines connecting this region to the rest of the nation means all that clean power is frequently bottled up by network congestion. “We can send a rover to Mars, but we can’t send an electron to California from New York,” U.S. special climate envoy John Kerry told the CERAWeek energy conference in Houston in March. No one is addressing that problem, according to a March 2022 report produced for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity. The report, from Boston-based consulting firm the Brattle Group, concluded: “Essentially no major interregional transmission projects have been planned and built in the last decade.” The report blamed federal and state policymakers, along with regional grid operators, for “insufficient leadership.” REUTERS INVESTIGATES More Reuters investigations and long-form narratives Got a confidential news tip? Reuters Investigates offers several ways to securely contact our reporters
    2 points
  13. WOW !! Does this put things in perspective……from California no less…
    2 points
  14. One year later, there is still no evidence of unmarked graves or missing children at former residential schools Brian Giesbrecht is a retired judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba, Nina Green is an independent researcher, and Tom Flanagan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of True North. May 27, 2022 will mark the one year anniversary of a shocking event that changed the course of Canadian history. Last year on May 27th, Chief Rosanne Casimir announced that ground penetrating radar (GPR) had detected the remains of 215 children who had died at the Kamloops Indian Residential School (KIRS) under sinister circumstances. More shocking still, Chief Casimir claimed that children as young as six had been awakened in the middle of the night to secretly bury these children in the apple orchard. The nation was thrown into a frenzy of self-flagellation. The Prime Minister had the flag lowered – where it stayed for six months – politicians openly wept, orange shirts were worn, monuments of small shoes appeared spontaneously all across Canada, churches were burned and vandalized, condemnations were issued by the Pope and world leaders, and lawyers immediately filed a complaint with the International Criminal Court at the Hague. The world was subsequently told by the media and Indigenous leaders that the human remains in Kamloops represented only a small number of thousands of such burials at former residential schools across Canada, and the federal government committed $321 million to GPR searches for unmarked graves. Yet strangely, to date no actual proof of human remains has been found anywhere. Over the course of the past year, hundreds of negative articles were written in which Chief Casimir’s claim that the remains of 215 children had been discovered at Kamloops were accepted as fact. Additional criminal acts were alleged. In the CBC’s Fifth Estateprogram in January, the school was described as a place of horror where children mysteriously went missing, bodies were seen hanging in barns, children were sexually abused, and burials took place at night. But is any of this true, and if so, where is the evidence? It is noteworthy that none of these hundreds of articles referred to the fact that many accomplished people who attended, or taught at, the Kamloops Indian Residential School made no reference to anything dark or evil, much less murderous. Len Marchand, for example, the first status Indian federal cabinet minister, transferred to KIRS by his own choice in 1949. In his autobiography he explicitly refused to say anything negative about the school, his only complaint being that the potatoes were watery. Three Indigenous teachers – Joe Stanley Michel, who graduated from KIRS, Benjamin Paul, and Mabel Caron – were on staff in 1962 when the CBC filmed a documentary at the Kamloops school, and none complained of anything untoward, either then or later. By 1973, half the staff at KIRS was Indigenous, and none of these Indigenous staff members complained of anything untoward at the school, neither then nor later. It is also noteworthy that none of these hundreds of articles mention any of the positive aspects of life at KIRS, including sports teams, musical and dance groups, picnics, socials, parties, Saturday night dances, and the spacious and comfortable student hostel built in 1962 – all while these alleged secret nighttime burials were taking place. Nor do any of these articles mention the fact that at that time the school had an impressive outdoor swimming pool, as shown in the photograph at the head of this article. Kamloops was one of at least three British Columbia residential schools with swimming pools. According to an announcement in the Indian Record in June 1959, the Kamloops pool was one hundred feet long, and was thus at least as large as the Centennial Pool built for the residents of Kamloops in 1958. Sports teams, parties, and swimming pools don’t support the narrative about residential schools that today fills print and social media spaces – namely that these schools were places of horror where children were starved, abused, murdered, and secretly buried. That is in large part because historical documents portraying the positive side of residential school life have been largely suppressed. The most revealing of these documents are the chronicles kept by the orders of Sisters who taught, nursed, and cared for the children, and the codices of the Oblate priests who administered the schools and were largely responsible for preserving Indigenous languages in Canada. These historical documents do not support the story of misery, abuse, neglect and murder now almost exclusively told, and for that reason have been suppressed and treated as though they do not exist, even though the National Centre for Truth and Reconiliation (NCTR) has had almost all of them in its possession for years. Similarly, photographs of children at residential schools do not support the narrative of misery, abuse, neglect and murder. Most of these old photographs show children who look happy, healthy and well nourished, and often depict them enjoying a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. The Sisters’ chronicles and the old photographs produce cognitive dissonance – how could such allegedly abused, neglected and malnourished children appear to be so healthy and happy? When looking at these old photographs, and in particular the photograph of the Kamloops swimming pool, Canadians might want to reflect on the stories they have been told about the horrors of residential schools and ask themselves whether they have been told the truth. That brings us back to the question of whether the May 27, 2021 announcement by Chief Casimir that the remains of 215 children had been found at Kamloops is true. There is a way to find out, and Chief Manny Jules promised it would be done. On the CBC’s Fifth Estateprogram in January Chief Manny Jules promised that the alleged burial site in the old apple orchard in Kamloops would be excavated. That promise has not been kept, and until that promise is kept, and excavation takes place, it cannot be said that the human remains of 215 children were actually found last May. In fact, there is no evidence to support the claim that children secretly died or were killed and buried in the old apple orchard. There are no names associated with these allegedly missing children, no lists of children who had gone missing or unaccounted for, no parents or relatives who claim that their child was among the 215. Who are the 215 children allegedly buried there? No one has the slightest idea. Not one of the many Indian Bands who sent children to the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, including the Kamloops Band itself, has ever come forward with the name of a single child who allegedly went to the school and never returned, and for whom the Band has been looking ever since. Not one. There is thus absolutely no evidence of any child who attended KIRS from any Band in BC actually having gone missing, much less that any child was murdered and secretly buried in the apple orchard by six year olds. That tale appears to be the figment of overactive imaginations. There is one way to solve this perplexing issue once and for all. An excavation, as Chief Manny Jules promised. Excavation would bring clarity to the situation, it would help bring closure to First Nations people grieving and struggling with the situation, and it could help our country heal. https://tnc.news/2022/05/19/guest-op-ed-one-year-later-there-is-still-no-evidence-of-unmarked-graves-or-missing-children-at-former-residential-schools/?fbclid=IwAR2h5iwVTbaPdRl375T38zY-niMPNZ7eDwRdiIe8LWxosVW-Qvy34cVG_2c
    2 points
  15. Reuters Daily Briefing Oklahoma lawmakers gave final approval to a bill that would ban nearly all abortions and would allow private citizens to sue anyone who helps women terminate a pregnancy. We examine the penalties abortion providers could face in a post-Roe world and whether the laws could apply to women seeking abortions.
    2 points
  16. A leaderless party is ahead in the current pole 04/27/2022 Conservatives open 'statistically significant' lead over Liberals: Nanos poll The Conservative Party of Canada has opened up a "statistically significant" lead over the governing Liberals, the latest polling from Nanos Research shows. As of April 22, support for the Conservatives increased 4.3 percentage points over four weeks to 35.6 per cent, overtaking the Liberals whose support dropped 2.2 percentage points to 30 per cent. The New Democrats also saw their support drop by two percentage points to 19.6 per cent. Support for the Green Party inched up 0.7 percentage points to 5.5 per cent, while dropping 0.5 and 0.2 percentage points respectively for the Bloc Quebecois (5.4 per cent) and People's Party (3.4 per cent). "But the key takeaway here is that the Conservatives are opening up a lead that is statistically significant. It's outside of the margin of error," pollster Nik Nanos said Wednesday on the Trend Line podcast. Nanos said he has not seen numbers like these for the Conservatives since Erin O'Toole was leader of the party. The Conservatives are currently in the process of choosing a new leader, with the deadline to submit the required $300,000 registration fee and 500 party member signatures set for this Friday. Nano said parties without leaders can become more popular than those with leaders, since there is no one at the helm for Canadians to be "repulsed by." Meanwhile, the weaker poll numbers represent a "complete dead cat bounce" for the Liberals and NDP, Nanos said. Last month, both parties agreed to enter into an arrangement that would see the NDP support the minority Liberals until 2025, in exchange for agreeing to prioritize certain policy issues such as dental care and housing. Nanos said while it is understandable that the Liberals would want to ensure their budgets are not defeated, it likely comes with a political trade-off. And if an election was held today, he said there is a good chance the Conservatives could win government. "Maybe one of the takeaways here is that although the Liberal-New Democrat arrangement, parliamentary arrangement, provides for stability, I think Canadians woke up and go, 'Hold on a second. Does that mean we're going to have this for until 2025?' Perhaps some Canadians aren't happy and looking at the Conservatives as an alternative." The polling is based on 1,084 random phone interviews with Canadians 18 and older, ending April 22. The data is based on a four-week rolling average where the oldest group of 250 interviews is dropped each week and a new group of 250 is added. The results are accurate within 2.9 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. With files from CTVNews.ca Producer Sarah Turnbull and The Canadian Press The latest poll numbers from Nanos Research show the Conservatives leading the Liberals, as of April 22, 2022. (Nanos)
    2 points
  17. Waddell's Wagon, created to train pilots to taxi in the 747 before prototypes were completed.
    2 points
  18. Canadian crews on the ground, in the air reach milestone transporting aid to war-torn Ukraine Airlift operation has flown about 80 missions between Scotland and Poland Chris Brown · CBC News · Posted: May 17, 2022 7:46 PM ET | Last Updated: May 17 An aircrew from Canadian Forces Base Trenton's 8 Wing pilot a C130-J Hercules aircraft to Poland from Prestwick, Scotland, for the next part of a journey transporting aid to Ukraine. (Chris Brown/CBC) As the massive rear door of the Canadian C-17 Globemaster lowered to the runway in rainy Prestwick, Scotland, members of Canadian Forces Base Trenton's 8 Wing tactical airlift detachment pounced. Within minutes, uniformed soldiers had unloaded pallets filled with what Canada's military euphemistically refers to as "lethal" and "non-lethal" aid — until one heavy load stopped them in their tracks. It took at least 10 soldiers, a forklift and a lot of grunting and groaning before the secretive, heavy pallet was able to be transferred onto a trailer and towed up to a waiting C130-J Hercules for the next part of the journey to Ukraine. CBC News was given unusual access this week to the operations of 8 Wing as aid destined for Ukraine was transported into Poland. Reporting on what was in the cargo wasn't permitted — other than it was for both humanitarian and military purposes — but whatever was wrapped up tightly on the giant pallet stood out for the effort required to load it onboard. A Royal Canadian Air Force C-17 Globemaster is shown on the runway in Prestwick, Scotland, about 45 minutes from Glasgow, this week. The aircraft had been filled with 'lethal' and 'non-lethal' aid to assist Ukraine in its war with Russia. (Chris Brown/CBC) Canada has said publicly that it is sending Ukraine four M777 howitzers, Carl Gustaf recoilless rifles, M72 Light Anti-tank Weapons (LAWs) and 7,500 hand grenades, along with different varieties of ammunition. The military aid is part of a $1.2-billion package the Trudeau government has approved to help Ukraine respond to Russia's Feb. 24 invasion. "Everyone is watching the news, so we know what is going on. We are proud to help Ukraine," said Sgt. Jimmy Noel, one of 30 members of the Royal Canadian Air Force's 436 Transport Squadron that has set up a temporary base at the Prestwick airport, about 45 minutes from Glasgow. A team from the RCAF's 429 Transport Squadron begins to transfer humanitarian and military aid from the large Globemaster aircraft to the smaller Hercules. (Chris Brown/CBC) Two J-class Hercules military transport aircraft have been taking turns doing the runs into Poland using two aircrews. "Since we got here at the beginning of March, we've flown approximately 80 missions," said Maj. Cam MacKay, who oversees the airlift operations at the Prestwick base. "We've moved over 900,000 kilograms, which is just over two million pounds. And we fly pretty regularly. This is really our bread and butter." A Canadian C-17 Globemaster aircraft sits in the foreground and a C130-J Hercules is shown in the rear on the tarmac at Prestwick's airport. (Chris Brown/CBC) Aid transported from Scotland to Poland Canadian military pilots are legally allowed to fly 120 hours a month — and on the busy Hercules missions of late, they have usually come close to that. The flight from Prestwick to their destination in Poland takes about three and a half hours and is mostly uneventful, although the descent is an unusually long and gradual one. Trudeau says Canada is sending artillery to Ukraine. Here's what that could mean The airport used as a base by NATO forces, which CBC News has been asked not to name, is relatively close to the Ukrainian border, and the skies around the airport contain restricted airspace — forcing incoming flights to fly lower than usual as they come in on their approach. Open-source flight tracking sites on the internet often show NATO reconnaissance aircraft flying through the airspace, monitoring activity in Ukraine. Maj. Cam MacKay oversees airlift operations at the Prestwick base. 'We've moved over 900,000 kilograms, which is just over two million pounds. And we fly pretty regularly,' he said. (Chris Brown/CBC) As a hub for incoming aid to Ukraine, the airspace in eastern Poland is heavily guarded, and the United States has said publicly that it has installed state-of-the-art Patriot anti-missile systems in the region. Russian officials have warned that it considers North Atlantic Treaty Organization flights and convoys carrying arms to Ukraine as "legitimate targets," but none have ever been attacked, and on the flight deck of the Hercules, MacKay said he believes the missions are safe. Canada prepping more aid as Ukraine war enters what former U.S. defence secretary calls 'critical' phase "I don't really think about it. The government of Canada sent us here to do a job, and we're very proud to be doing that job. And we don't really think about the other piece," he said. In Poland, an American ground crew met the Canadian plane and quickly unloaded the pallets from the rear of the Hercules — even the extremely heavy one was removed easily with the heavy-lift equipment at the NATO base. Canadian military personnel have dubbed their temporary home in Scotland as CFB Prestwick. (Chris Brown/CBC) The ground stop lasted less than 30 minutes before the Hercules crew was back in the air again, heading to Brussels to prepare for another transport the following day. "There's no fixed end date on the operation right now," MacKay said. "That doesn't mean it's going to go on indefinitely, but we'll start rotating our personnel crews. We're just hearing very positive feedback."
    2 points
  19. It's OK, Moon', pour yourself another bowl of Corn Flakes . Truly, bugs me too when cut-and-pastes are not linked. OP likely just didn't catch the ..er.. seniority .. of that piece, altho' the year references were a hint . But, if you really want to know it, just swipe a sentence or two, place it in quotes in the Google window, and voila! Cheers - IFG
    2 points
  20. That's such an Irish thing to say - I gotta go work there just for the punchlines.
    2 points
  21. Sounds like we are of the same vintage. I was a proud graduate of Medicine Hat High School in 1961.
    2 points
  22. Slave days were once a year and people volunteered to be auctioned off. The money raised went to support various functions. Your slave for the day, carried your books etc. Mostly boys bidding on girls but of course some girls were bidding on their boy friends to stop anyone else winning their company during the school day. I am talking about the early 60s in high school. It was seen to be good fun and everyone enjoyed it. By the by, slaves throughout history were and in some parts of the world still are, from all races and colours. Not just afro Americans. (but of course you knew that but others may have forgotten)
    2 points
  23. We may have to redefine absurdity, the previous definition didn't account for deliberate stupidity: Washington Post rages against George Washington University, demands name change Ironically, the article's author doesn't call out the Washington Post, which is also named after the founding father.
    2 points
  24. https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/ontario-pc-candidate-stephen-lecce-apologizes-after-participating-in-slave-auction I bet the PCs will go about this all wrong... they should try the liberal approach: Slaves became workers, workers became friends, and friends became allies in the fight against racism. This is a teaching moment, it's an opportunity to have a meaningful discussion about the systemic wrongs of the past. Clearly, anyone who doesn't want to have that discussion is a racist.
    2 points
  25. The First Direct Flight from Whitehorse and Yellowknife Lands at Toronto Pearson Airport 11 May 2022Canadian Aviation News Air North, Yukon’s Airline, celebrates new direct connection to Toronto, making way for new economic opportunities and travel for the Yukon and the Northwest Territories TORONTO, May 11, 2022 /CNW/ – Last night passengers aboard Air North, Yukon’s Airline, flight number 4N823, landed at Toronto Pearson International Airport, becoming the first to enjoy Canada’s first-ever scheduled direct service between Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Toronto. To mark this milestone occasion for Canadian aviation, passengers were met by a special event at Toronto Pearson International Airport, celebrating its cultural and economic significance. Air North, Yukon’s Airline, celebrates new direct connection to Toronto, making way for new economic opportunities and travel for the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. (photo credit: Simon Blakesley) (CNW Group/Air North, Yukon’s Airline) Attendees were treated to a special performance from the Teechik Dancers, a Vuntut Gwitchin group from Old Crow, Yukon. (photo credit: Simon Blakesley) (CNW Group/Air North, Yukon’s Airline) President and CEO of Air North, Yukon’s Airline, Joe Sparling, welcomes Air North, Yukon’s Airline flight number 4N823 at Toronto Pearson International Airport. (photo credit: Simon Blakesley) (CNW Group/Air North, Yukon’s Airline) The seasonal route is expected to not only expand tourism and business travel to the territories, but holds particular significance to the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, from Old Crow, Yukon, who own 49 per cent of Air North, Yukon’s Airline. As the Yukon’s only community accessible exclusively by air, this route will be a necessary means for economic growth, and an important cultural and personal link. As Canadians seek to better understand each other, the flight unlocks unprecedented opportunities for more people than ever before to explore both Territories and immerse themselves in the cultures of Indigenous peoples who call the Yukon and Northwest Territories home. To celebrate the inaugural flight, Premier of the Yukon, Sandy Silver, and the Yukon’s Minister of Economic Development, Tourism and Culture Ranj Pillai, attended the Toronto Pearson Airport event along with Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Councilor Bonnee Bingham. Attendees were treated to a special performance from the Teechik Dancers, a Vuntut Gwitchin group from Old Crow, Yukon. “By providing direct flights between Whitehorse and Toronto, we are in turn connecting Yukon businesses to the country’s biggest economic hub and creating a pathway for people around the world to visit our territory,” Ranj Pillai Minister of Tourism and Culture and Economic Development. “We are thrilled Air North, Yukon’s Airline is able to offer this new service and I look forward to welcoming more visitors to the Yukon and sharing the economic benefits that come with this additional air access.” “Air North, Yukon’s Airline owes our success to key Indigenous and community partnerships, which have allowed us to navigate the many challenges we have encountered during the past 20 years,” said Joe Sparling, President and CEO of Air North, Yukon’s Airline. “We are pleased to have added Toronto to our network, ensuring residents of the Yukon’s regional communities have seamless and affordable access to the rest of Canada and the world. This will broaden education, sports and cultural horizons for youth, and facilitate regional economic development. We are proud to make the North a better place to live and work.” As part of last night’s celebrations Premier Sandy Silver, Minister Ranj Pillai, and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Councilor Brenda Bingham, spoke to the airline’s history and future, noting their mutual excitement for the opportunities that grow from this new development. The twice-weekly service from Toronto, operating via Yellowknife, is now available to book at flyairnorth.com. About Air North, Yukon’s Airline Air North, Yukon’s Airline was founded in 1977 and is 49% owned by the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. One in 15 Yukoners have an equity or employment stake in the airline. Air North, Yukon’s Airline, operates a fleet of Boeing 737 jets and ATR 42 turboprops on routes throughout Yukon and to the Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Alberta, and seasonally to Ontario. In 2020 it was the recipient of the Travellers’ Choice Award for Best Airline in Canada and Best Airline (Specialty and Leisure) in North America based upon glowing reviews from its passengers.
    2 points
  26. About as well as every other attempt to liberate Afghanistan in recent history.
    2 points
  27. A sad commentary on where we’re headed:
    2 points
  28. 2 points
  29. POOF.... 70 percenters are once again saying "my body my choice," and they're saying it with a straight face.
    2 points
  30. When the crowd boos you, that can’t be good. Personality I thought Pierre was hands down the clear winner and the one to beat. I wasn’t impressed by the combative approach but I can understand why it was done. IMO Conservatives can’t be sucked into voting in another Red Tory for a leader and if that’s what it takes to get the message across in plain clear, concise messaging so be it !
    2 points
  31. Yup, the one thing about the Goddess of Reality is that she doesn't care about "your truth or your reality." Reality is what it is and failing to acknowledge it means that it is certain to work against you at every turn. BTW, her sister is the Goddess of unintended consequence. Quote of the day. "When I was a graduate student, all the professors would say, 'Oh, we'll never see this era again of letting the inflation genie out of the bottle,'" economist Constance Smith, a professor emeritus at the University of Alberta, said wryly. Examples are legion, we could have a full thread on this subject, but at every turn, and at every opportunity, they never missed an opportunity to miss an opportunity. Doing the worst possible thing at the worst possible time has become SOP. Even to a dumb grunt, the magnitude and effect of the list is gobsmacking. IMO, this goes way beyond inadvertently aligning holes in Swiss cheese, it rises to the level of thinking that Cheese Whiz is smart. Got a supply line problem exasperated by a driver shortage? Well, the only reasonable thing to do is fire a bunch of them, make it harder for them to cross the border, then introduce rules to ban tractors more than 9 years old, then ban non unionized drivers at container piers. That should help eh? After you’ve worked hard (on several fronts simultaneously) to disrupt the supply line process and create inflationary pressures (on everything delivered by trucks, which is virtually everything BTW) flood the country with cheap money and pretend it will provide stimulus. OK, so I’m not an economist and my eyes glaze over when confronted with financial dilemmas. But what about basic common dog… at what point does that kick in? I’m not a mechanic but I’d suggest not driving your car off a pier to clean the tires. I'm not a chicken biologist either, but just because roosters will eat laying mash doesn't mean they produce eggs...
    2 points
  32. As a passenger I would rather have a two-hour layover somewhere, get off the aircraft, go to a lounge, have some food and refreshments, wash up then fly on.
    2 points
  33. Rudder Please don't cloud the issue with facts
    2 points
  34. We enjoy your input Mitch... hope you continue to pop in and stir the pot from time to time. It keeps us on our toes!
    2 points
  35. Kind words Kip. Thanks. You know the hurt all too well, when someone who occupies a big part of your heart is taken away... I am familiar with the rainbow bridge, and I love the notion... Thanks for the reminder. It was not my intention to focus on such painful feelings though... Lets leave them unsaid and carry on with the banter? Shall we?
    2 points
  36. Re Dogs......my middle son had a Chocolate Lab while at Queens..."Ellis" died at 13 1/2...He had a Yellow Lab, "Yukon" and he died at 10.5, (Renal failure) and the he had "Rumple", British Red Lab that just passed away 3 weeks ago, nearing 14 years....The passing of his dogs really puts him a funk so I can understand how you felt when Griffon left you, but take heart,....apparently you will meet your best friend on the Rainbow Bridge.. All the best my friend and keep smiling , keep them guessing
    2 points
  37. This is exactly right.... and neither does Canada or the USA: Adam Zivo: No, Ukraine does not have a neo-Nazi problem 'If you want to know the truth, ask us. We’re here. We’re on the front line and we know better' Democrats and Liberals should read the next part twice... here we have a liberal rag contradicting the BS assertions they've previously made many times, they are doing it now because it serves the current narrative and they expect you to forget all about their previous hemorrhagic secretions of crap. This isn't new, it's always been true... liberal minded journalists and their legion of acolytes all know that they're liars and they know they're liars even as they spin the tapestry of lies. Only a fool would believe the Nazi myth
    2 points
  38. It's hard to imagine much more up side for the agenda of madness. The "I know what let's do" crowd have their work cut out for them now. What's amazing is the amount of lasting damage these folks can create in a short period of time and how blissfully unaware they are of the consequences. The lack of awareness here is palpable: https://nationalpost.com/opinion/raymond-j-de-souza-new-report-recommends-turning-the-armed-forces-into-a-secular-theocracy At the risk of outing myself, In a past life I briefly worked for a simulator company as a TRI/TRE. They had a great secretary/receptionist there who was well known, well liked, and extremely popular. In an effort to save money, they fired her and replaced her with an auto attendant program. Well, It turned out that the auto attendant couldn't order stationary, repair the photocopier, keep the fancy coffee machine running, clean the lunch room, coordinate external contracts, entertain clients, or much of anything else for that matter. I wasn't long before most calls were in the form of a complaints and all of us transferred those calls directly to the manager responsible for the firing. When they tried to hire her back they discovered that she was working for an insurance company for considerably more money. They ended up outbidding the insurance company and hiring her back with an apology. This is that, and the only people who don't know what chaplains do on deployments are those who have never been on deployments. Few will be defending this following the first ramp ceromony that goes horribly astray. BTW, gobsmacked is actually a word...
    2 points
  39. The A10 shoots em up… the farmers drag away the corpses.
    2 points
  40. Is it possible that the "not voting" sentiment is driven by the lack of policy discussion and options during the run up to elections? It seems to me that the lack of policy (meat in the sandwich) might be contributory.... not sure about that though. I don't know how to account for the numbers, I can't rationalize the addiction to burning wet wood either. When you combine liberal, NDB, Green and Bloc voters though it's a substantial majority that typically hovers at 70% (plus or minus a bit), hence my common referral to 70 percenters. Those 70 percenters may migrate back and forth between parties a bit but their narrative changes little as a result of the temporary shift in affiliation. That fact, assuming it is a fact, bodes poorly for places like Florida who are gaining population by virtue of the exodus from blue states. I fear that trend may serve to void the slow trend (I'll call it progress) that you have noticed... I'm rooting for ya though. It's just that people tend to keep the same narratives and vote the same way when they are unable (or perhaps unwilling) to establish the link between policy (actions) and observable outcomes. Establishing that connection has proven more difficult than I would have guessed.
    2 points
  41. Another sign of erosion of our democracy in Canada….sockboy must be really getting tired of having to think up non answers to those embarrassing questions during question period whenever parliament is sitting: https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/liberals-propose-temporary-new-power-to-adjourn-house-without-notice-and-revive-late-night-sittings-1.5878835 Striving to achieve the basic dictatorship he so admires……and Canadians will just shrug. We get the government we deserve.
    2 points
  42. https://flyer.co.uk/junkers-shows-new-a60-two-seater-and-reveals-ju-52-project/ Junkers shows new A60 two-seater and reveals JU-52 project Junkers A60 proof of concept aircraft shown at AERO. Photos: Ed Hicks The new Junkers Aircraft Company sprang two early surprises at the AERO General Aviation show being staged at Friedrichshafen, Germany this week. The first was the A60, a two-seater with side-by-side seating and retractable undercarriage which will go into production next year. Like its stablemate, the Junior A50, the A60 meets the criteria for the 600kg microlight class and is powered by a 100hp Rotax 912iS engine. It can be operated with an open cockpit or enclosed. Junkers A50 and A60 The 1930s inspired A50 meanwhile is expected to receive approval from the German aviation authority, the DULV, as a 600kg microlight this summer. The first 29 aircraft will be priced at €179,000 and one-third have already been sold. The second big surprise was the announcement of a new project to build replicas of the famous three-engine Junkers JU-52, reengined with three RED A03-005 V12 diesels each producing 550hp. Yes, Junkers is planning to develop a three-engine JU-52 NG The JU-52 NG, will be built using the same corrugated aluminium sheet metal skin over a hollow frame. The fuselage can be configured to hold six cargo pallets or 14 passengers, or a mix of the two. Avionics will also be modern, from Garmin and include both VFR and IFR options. Figures released so far by Junkers Flugzeugwerke AG, claim a max take-off weight of 8,616kg, cruise speed of 180km/h (97kt) and a fuel burn of 77 litres/hour for each engine. The JU-52 NG will have modern engines – the 550hp RED A03-005 V12 diesel “This aircraft is simpler in operational handling than any other of its kind,” said a Junkers statement. “No complex systems for refueling, no special equipment for loading and unloading, and flight characteristics that allow take-off and landings on short and unpaved areas. “The absolute highlight, however, is the use of the JU-52 NG for sightseeing flights. There is no better aircraft than the JU-52 NG for this type of flight. “Imagine sitting as one of 14 passengers in the JU-52 NG, each with their own window seat, flying slow and low in front of the New York skyline. An experience you will never forget!”
    2 points
  43. Except it's not lacklustre reporting, or an accidental omission caused by laziness IMO... it's deliberate propaganda. They know exactly what they're doing and they were payed to do it. What I think they don't get (yet) is the lasting nature of the damage they've inflicted on their brand. Like CNN and a few others, I don't see how they recover from it and like Twitter, Disney, etc the reckoning will eventually come to pass and they will be utterly shocked and dismayed by both the speed of it and the lack of sympathy for their plight.
    2 points
  44. Too familiar. They took a workable technique and overused it to the point of collapse. Now that everyone who disagrees with them is either a Nazi, a white supremacist or a Qannon supporter there is little room for anything worse. How do you top Nazi if Nazi is where you started? The midterms are sure to be a blood bath but hopefully Republicans will be wise and measured in their approach. Any equal and opposite pushback against unhinged madness isn't what new conservatives (who are old liberals BTW) actually want. Steady the ship, adjust the ballast, and fire the Captain, Executive Officer, Chief Engineer, Navigating Officer and Ship's Surgeon (he would be the one handing out the puberty blockers). Reenter the waypoints, have the Blind Pilotage Team and Cable Party close up and enter the bloody harbour like a sensible individual who has done it once or twice before. That's it... that's all. Even a Fishead can figure it out. If you can't stay upright in two dimensions and 10 knots then stay home.
    2 points
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