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  1. It’s interesting that the political word of the year is “unacceptable” (Rogers… unacceptable, Hockey Canada… unacceptable, passport delays… unacceptable, airport delays… unacceptable, Catholic Church… unacceptable, inflation… unacceptable, higher interest rates… unacceptable, situation in Ukraine... unacceptable, etc, etc, etc) yet it doesn’t seem to apply to the people running the government or the price of gas.
    6 points
  2. My wife (who is legally blind)travelled to Vancouver Island last Saturday on WestJet. The aircraft (737) was full, lots of children and thus quite a handful for preboarding etc. From the time we checked in upon arrival at YYC, I was impressed with the professionalism of the agents. I was given a gate pass so I would accompany my wife to the gate. We got there quite early and took a seat. When the agent came on duty, she spotted my wife (white cane) , came over, introduced herself and verified who my wife was. The agent then explained the boarding process asked if my wife needed a wheelchair or if she was comfortable with walking. She then told us that she or the other gate agent would come over and take my wife to the aircraft. Just prior to the first boarding announcement, she came over to us took my wife to the aircraft. Well done WestJet...................... Thanks.
    5 points
  3. The following is written by Leslyn Lewis. A political prisoner is defined as “a person imprisoned for their political beliefs and actions.” This definition begs the question of whether Trucker Convoy organizer Tamara Lich is a political prisoner. In a previous letter, I outlined the fact that the first judge who detained Tamara was a former Liberal candidate, and the crown attorney who prosecuted Tamara had donated over $17,000 to the Liberal Party since 2013. The fact that that we have to ask if Canada has political prisoners, speaks to the state of our declining democracy. But there seems to be no depth that Justin Trudeau and the Liberals will not sink to in order to control our thoughts, actions and even our democratic institutions. We never imagined our government would invoke the Emergencies Act without exhausting existing options and without a request from law enforcement – but that happened. We also never conceived that Canadians could be targeted for their political views, their property confiscated and their bank accounts frozen out of a political vendetta – but that too occurred in our democracy. These events have sent tremors into the hearts of Canadians, some of whom have picked up and left this country out of fear that we are descending into a full-blown dictatorship. Some patriots I’ve met have even been put on a terrorist watch list just for attending the Freedom Convoy protest. Tamara was recently released from jail after being arrested for allegedly breaching her bail conditions at a civil liberties awards gala event. Tamara, who is a 49-year-old Métis grandmother with no criminal record, spent 49 days in jail awaiting trial for charges stemming from her role as a Freedom Convoy organizer. The Crown argued that she was a danger to the public and would likely reoffend, despite the fact that all of her charges were non-violent in nature. In this extraordinary case, Tamara appeared before the court 5 times relating to bail conditions – [see the table summary of her case at the bottom of this email]. A Political Prisoner? Summary of the Evidence Here are the facts leading up to Tamara’s latest arrest and bail hearings: Tamara’s original bail conditions prohibited her from communicating with any convoy organizers EXCEPT in the presence of her lawyer or through her lawyer. The alleged bail breach happened at a civil liberties awards gala where Tamara was receiving an award on June 16th, 2022; she was seen interacting with fellow convoy leader, Tom Marazzo. There were pictures and a video that showed her sitting at the same table as Mr. Marazzo and giving her acceptance speech. Upon returning to the table, she passes by Mr. Marazzo, touches his back and whispers something in his ear. The entire interaction lasted no more than 3 seconds. No breaches were related to the content of her speech. An Ontario warrant for her arrest was issued on June 22nd. In an unorthodox move, on June 24th the Ottawa Crown Attorney extended the warrant to Canada-wide status so Tamara could be arrested in Alberta. However, still without a valid warrant that could be executed in Alberta, Tamara was still arrested by police in Medicine Hat on June 27th. The following day, the Crown in Alberta obtained a remand “to enable police in Ontario to get the warrant endorsed for arrest in Alberta. Two investigators in the homicide unit with the Ottawa Police Service, travelled to Alberta to execute the warrant once it had been endorsed for execution in Alberta” and they returned Tamara to Ontario. In his ruling, Superior Court Justice Andrew Goodman found the Justice of the Peace who had previously denied Tamara bail had “overstated” the impact of the contact made between Tamara and Marazzo at the gala. Justice Goodman rejected the Justices of the Peace’s conclusion that “vulnerable victims of the February freedom trucker convoy protest” would continue to live in fear of a “re-occurrence of the protests…”. Justice Goodman took issue with the Justice of the Peace’s reliance upon an irrational fear. He stated: “It is not reasonable to draw the inference that an interaction of less than three seconds in public at an awards ceremony as well as a group photograph and related, albeit brief contact giving rise to the potential for a breach of terms would reasonably cause such fear.” Justice Goodman emphasized the presumption of innocence that is entrenched in our Charter and noted that it is important not confuse bail with being on trial: “…whether or not the applicant participated in any criminal conduct will ultimately fall to be decided by a trial court.” Justice Goodman scolded the Justice of the Peace, he state that: “I find that the Justice of the Peace’s reasons suffer from erroneous conclusions of the relevant legal issues and he misapprehended the evidence when addressing the secondary and tertiary ground concerns. As the Justice of the Peace’s decision is clearly inappropriate, the detention order must be set aside.” He also dismissed the concern that Tamara was a danger to the public – and noted that she abided by strict bail terms for 4 months, and she sought permission before attending the gala. Justice Goodman echoed a previous bail decision by Justice Phillips stating: “The bail process is not the forum to address the myriad of opinion or issues arising from Ms. Lich’s or the Freedom Convoy’s disruption of the public peace or behaviour or to advance a political or social position one way or the other. I also agree with Phillips J. that no court would ever seek to control the possession or manifestation of political views.” (emphasis added) The issue of public fear was raised in every bail hearing and also by the Justice of the Peace that oversaw the warrant. Justice Goodman reminds us of the importance of balancing fears with the presumption of innocence and upholding the Charter: “In my opinion, a reasonable member of the community, informed of the principles of fundamental justice and Charter values and who appreciates the presumption of innocence and the constitutional right to reasonable bail would not view Ms. Lich’s release with great shock and indignation.” The Verdict So, the answer is yes. Tamara does meet the definition of a political prisoner – she was imprisoned for her political beliefs and actions. In fact, two agents of the court had Liberal ties and did not recuse themselves from Tamara’s case. In addition, she was arrested in Alberta before a valid warrant in Alberta was issued. And, the grounds cited by the Justice of the Peace in denying her bail were clearly flawed. Finally, two judges – Justice Phillips and Justice Goodman – made reference to the fact that people cannot be jailed because of their political beliefs. This was a clear sign that the Liberal political vendetta had infested our legal system, and it took two judges to call it out and bring balance back to the justice system and remind us all that “no court would ever seek to control the possession or manifestation of political views“. Sadly, over the past two years under COVID-19, Justin Trudeau and the Liberals have created an environment that has undermined our institutions for political gains. Under the guise of protecting people’s health and safety, we have seen the erosion of our constitutional rights, and seen our justice system, law enforcement, health system and media weaponized to silence political opponents. This environment normalized charging and disciplining doctors with dissenting opinions, charging pastors who held outdoor drive-in services for their church members, freezing bank accounts and confiscating property of protesters, publicly shaming and disclosing the addresses of people who donated to a democratic movement, and numerous other public character assassinations. This Liberal government even barred duly elected Members of Parliament from taking their seat in the House of Commons in the name of public health even though they knew that the vaccine did not prevent transmission of covid. These dictatorial acts have dangerously eroded the foundations of our democracy and the rule of law. The Liberals penchant for weaponizing institutions to silence their political opponents is undermining the very pillars that should be holding society together. Tamara Lich is just one example of what happens when government uses its power to control Canadians, to inflame hate and division and to infest independent institutions with political operatives. The only solution to cure the fragility of our democracy is to have citizens of all political stripes acknowledge the dangerous course that we are on, and to have courageous leaders involve checks and balances that will compel institutional actors to publicly declare conflicts as well as amend the Emergencies Act to require a minimum of 2/3 of parliament to invoke it.
    3 points
  4. I'm not sure the eventual result of the raid even matters anymore, either possible outcome will alienate half of the country for years to come and the loosing side will cry foul. Democrats will soon be fervently wishing they never opened this can of worms, even if they have actionable evidence.... LOL, especially then IMO. I'm betting Trump will now announce that he will run in 2024 and pledge to tear down and rebuild a weaponized DOJ and FBI. imagine if he's blocked from doing that by an iffy felony charge/conviction. In a few years, when we look back on it, perhaps all sides will agree that this debacle marked the end of bipartisan cooperation and ushered in an era of winner take all elections. At that point, voters will have real cause to fear election outcomes that don't go their way... a common Banana Republic sentiment and a major inducement to election violence, civil disobedience, sanctuary jurisdictions, and open domestic conflict/partisan violence.
    3 points
  5. Pilots have to fly. Aviation Mechanics have to work on aircraft. These are skills that need to be maintained and you maintain them by actually doing your job. So is it better to have them flying the PM around or just doing joy rides to go see a girl friend, (boy friend or whatever). It can actually be looked on as a cost saving from the tax payers POV. My objection is that this trip was nothing but another holiday while the country's economy is crumbling, the mandates are still hammering our transportation systems etc. He is out doing retail politics and not doing his job. (Mind you we are probably better off that way anyway.)
    3 points
  6. While Canadians sit back smugly thinking we are the envy of the world, tolerating a government that “keeps us safe, has our backs from day one” all the while meeting our climate targets, naively thinking the rest of the world will follow suit…..here is a perspective from someone has been travelling the world, observing and noting the reaction of other citizens. JORDAN PETERSON: Worst is yet to come from Trudeau liberals
    3 points
  7. What a change in 7 years……..a PM that didn’t talk down to the citizens and make them feel guilty for being Canadian. Btw…Trudeau doesn’t go anywhere these days without a overzealous security detail….take look at one of his bodyguards, the one 6 ft ahead of sockboy. Trudeau is 6’2….this guy must go around 7’3”!!! (It’s at the 5:55 mark).
    3 points
  8. From two years ago…the story didn’t get a lot of attention, probably due to it didn’t fit the narrrative of the time. https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/13/us/north-carolina-boy-killed/index.html?fbclid=IwAR0bD7s4b0X-j8uiUEYJxXak9G81fHvRQ7_-9PCQQ5r7WNUMbozFqkt9nZc “ The whole nation stood together in solidarity for the senseless death of George Floyd. So I’m curious, how many will stand together in solidarity & demand justice for the senseless death of Cannon Hinnant? Does HIS life not matter? Cannon was 5 years old. He was white. This past Sunday, he was riding his bike in front of his house & Darius Nathaniel Sessoms, a black male, walked up, put a gun to his head and shot & killed Cannon. A 5 year old white boy was shot & killed by a 27 year old black male...on purpose....for no reason. Did you read that? Why does one life matter so much it captures our Nation, but no one is talking about Cannon?? I don’t want to look away. I hope you can’t. I want to know why this little boy & HIS senseless death are not just as important. Who is going to paint “Cannon” on the side of a building? What National sports team is going to wear T-shirts with his name on them? You guessed it. No one. Every single person should be demanding justice for Cannon, the little 5 yr old boy who was killed for no reason but being white. Think on that. Look at his face. I’m sick to death of hearing ONLY “Black Lives Matter". The agenda here is to perpetuate division & promulgate racism. I for one am not going to feel guilty or apologize for being white, nor will I be quiet when the SAME THING is happening to others, but no one is talking about that. “
    2 points
  9. I've been counting the hours here... other than Bill, snowflakes have been strangely silent. Maybe they were hoping it was a white nationalist Christian behind the attack. Another thing I've noticed is that Democrats have suddenly stopped criticizing law enforcement. Coincidentally, it happened right after the raid on Trumps estate in Florida. Bill Maher reacts to Salman Rushdie attack: Don't come at me with 'Islamophobic' to shut off Islam debate Bill Maher calls Islam a 'fundamentalist religion' following the attack of his friend Salman Rushdie
    2 points
  10. https://www.wearefinn.com/topics/posts/p4-787-flies-ukrainian-refugees-to-italy/#:~:text=Filmmaker%2C owner and Boeing 787,Argentina bound for Warsaw%2C Poland.
    2 points
  11. After Trump, all they had to do was nothing. Stay the course, maintain a moderate level of competence and avoid rubbing smelly cheese into the faces of the conservative voters they ridiculed and insulted during the election. Back then, there was still time to fix this... they could have repaired things. But no, they can't seem to help themselves, I'm guessing it isn't an accident either, it can't be. They're at least smart enough not to be stupid... surely they realize the devastating level of polarization they've created and know it will take a decade to undo the damage if they start today and work hard. These aren't small, statistically insignificant numbers either, they're deliberately alienating half of the country and setting themselves up for real trouble in the process. And that's just the ideology side of the equation, their defunding efforts (for example) are literally getting people killed now and the people doing the dying are the very ones they say they think they're helping. Past PNR now and only a smoking gun with Trump's finger prints on it will do. This raid might seem insignificant to liberals now, but in years to come it could easily be seen as a pivotal moment in the decline of America. Foreign enemies won't cause that decline either, it will come from within... those enemies will certainly capitalize on the division but they're aspirations and actions aren't causal. This is entirely self inflicted and unnecessary.... all they had to do was nothing.
    2 points
  12. The release of such a sweeping edict, with little concern for the hundreds of small business owners and sporstmen, sounded very sophmoric from our highly experienced foreign affairs minister, the one who didn’t know about the 5 Eyes memo.. ”like, I was on a sleepover at Marco’s place, and we like, had this problem and, uhhh, we had to solve it, soooooo, like, we came up with this idea….., we just banned it…cause I have the power, ehhh? We can do it cause, we have to, like, have to keep Canadians safe, like from day one….and we just did it cause we don’t have a parliament anymore, and people like, believe us on like guns are bad, they kill people and stuff and our best bud jagmeet says he will back us on anything, right? Uumm ya so we did it, so that’s good right? And Marco says gun numbers will go down so that’s good right? Uumm that’s all I have to say about that.” Unbelievable…
    2 points
  13. I don’t think any reasonable Canadian citizen has a problem with a leader flying anywhere when on LEGITIMATE government business. But first of all you have to be recognized as a leader rather than a scum sucking slug. ‘Glad-handing kids on Trains in the Okanagan, playing with toys with kindergarten kids, waving a hat at the stampede, jetting off on a private jet on yet another tax payer funded vacation has SFA to do with running a country. Professional pilots don’t even fly as much as he does FFS. As for the enormous cost for planes and personnel etc etc etc etc required to do all this CONSTANT Political campaigning, chartering a jet of the required size from one of our national airlines would go a long way to show Canadians he cares about them rather than his ego. ‘Just my opinion of course.
    2 points
  14. Probably are not too many safe places left in Canada he could go without being booooed
    2 points
  15. Re shootings over the weekend in toronto it is becoming so commonplace that there is no uproar anymore…people realize that, for the most part, the violence involves a specific group in society…..after hours clubs, many illegal establishments or with individuals “known to the authorities”…….natural selection, so to speak.
    2 points
  16. “We are now being asked to apologize for Slavery. I fail to understand how the country of Canada should or can apologize since Canada never condoned or practiced "Slavery".” I agree….repeating a post made earlier on another thread (forgive the bluntness but it is direct) ….
    2 points
  17. Given a choice…Me Three…..but the reality is Pollievre is the best on offer. Has anyone else noticed the underlying panic about Pollievre in the leftist MSM. Much like they did with Scheer, they are doing every thing possible to shed a negative light on the man. Proof positive Conservatives have a winner in Pierre
    2 points
  18. We have had the service for years. What has changed is that it's all done on an app on the EFB. The FA has the ability to call the doctor through their EFB or it can be used by an onboard doctor to talk directly to the doctor on the ground. If the wifi doesn't work the report can be airdropped to the pilots so we can call on the sat phone with all the info. I'm sure we're not the first to have such a device/service, but it's huge step up from what we had. Very happy about it.
    2 points
  19. Mark Steyn on vaccines
    2 points
  20. Trudeau fiddles, while the federal government crumbles around him The Trudeau Liberals are failing to deliver even the most basic government services The federal government is broken — but you wouldn’t know it from following the summer adventures of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It’s no secret that the prime minister loves photo-ops, but he usually manages to at least tangentially connect them to some sort of issue. War in Ukraine? Time for a heavily photographed European tour. Outrage over residential schools? Someone find him a teddy bear and a well-lit place to kneel. But his latest string of photo-ops don’t even bother with rhyme or reason as he tours the country seemingly at random, for no real purpose, doing basically nothing. One day he’s playing camp counsellor in the woods, the next he’s all smiles and no mask on a sightseeing train. Next thing you know, he’s picking cherries and chumming it up with fruit growers in British Columbia. So far, no one’s been able to figure out quite why he’s doing this. He hasn’t used the trips to make any policy or funding announcements, wasn’t in town for fundraisers and the notion of a fall election seems absurd even by Liberal standards. It’d be great if the media could ask him during one of his many photo-ops, but he’s forbidden journalists from posing questions. He wouldn’t want anything to distract from his carefully curated tableaus, and reporters have a pesky habit of wanting to talk about things other than children’s stories and fruit. Meanwhile, across Canada, people are literally camping outside Service Canada locations in attempts to secure passports. Airports suffer from rampant flight delays and cancellations, lost luggage, long lines and staff shortages. Pilots can’t get certified or re-certified because, according to Dario Matrundola, president of Canadian Flyers Aviation College, Transport Canada “completely dropped the ball.” In Quebec, hundreds of court cases are being postponed due to a shortage of judges. Emergency rooms are closing due to staffing and capacity issues. Both hospitals in Saint John, N.B., hit capacity last weekend, forcing some residents to drive over an hour to receive emergency care. In Montreal, a children’s hospital was recently forced to turn away patients. The immigration system is backlogged with over 2.7 million applications in the queue. We have stopped taking new applications to resettle the Afghans who helped our Forces and now face persecution from the Taliban. Many Indigenous communities still don’t have potable drinking water. The federal government’s idea of solving what many believe is a housing crisis is to spend public money on building a paltry 260 new homes — a bad, government-centric response that helps almost no one. The ArriveCAN app is glitching and ordering vaccinated travellers into quarantine. If you live in the downtown core of many Canadian cities, it’s impossible to miss the growing numbers of people sleeping, eating and even defecating on the streets. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Where is the Liberals’ new China policy that they’ve been promising since 2019? Or someone to fill the ambassador to China role that’s now been vacant for over six months? Is anyone even enforcing our Russian sanctions (when the federal government itself isn’t breaking them)? It’s becoming harder to find areas of government that aren’t in crisis than ones that are. Chaos and dysfunction are seemingly everywhere. The Trudeau Liberals are failing to deliver on even the most basic government services. Ironically, it’s the same politicians and political staffers responsible for these failures who can’t seem to fathom why voters are losing trust in Canadian institutions. They view frustration with government “gatekeepers” as unfounded and dangerous, rather than the predictable result of their negligence and general apathy toward average Canadians. Canadians are frustrated that they cannot receive even basic government services in a timely manner, and that their vacation plans are being disrupted, after over two years of complying with coronavirus restrictions. But the Liberals can’t see that because they’re too busy patting themselves on the back for their supposed moral authority, and Trudeau doesn’t want to hear it while he tours the nation’s summer camps. It’s often Conservatives who are accused of wanting to let government services erode, in order to usher in privatization. But under the Liberals, those services have all but collapsed. If the left believes that big government is the solution to the problems that plague our nation, they couldn’t be doing more to undermine their own ideology. Rather than demand change, Liberal supporters seem determined to defend and deflect, sacrificing their party’s credibility to serve Trudeau’s cult of personality. What Canada needs right now is for the prime minister to start demonstrating a real commitment to getting the federal government working again. That means focusing on real, tangible results, rather than taking an extended vacation. School children may be out for the summer, but as our head of government, Trudeau does not have that same luxury — especially when his government is in such a state of disarray. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/np-view-trudeau-fiddles-while-the-federal-government-crumbles-around-him
    2 points
  21. Cool! I work there and I hadn’t even seen the full length version until now. This one dropped yesterday. A different take with less of footage taken over fires, but some may find it interesting. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2022-07-20/how-climate-change-impacts-modern-aerial-firefighting-video
    2 points
  22. https://www.rebelnews.com/trudeau_liberals_seeking_to_cap_oil_and_gas_sector_to_force_emissions_down_40_by_2030 Whether by cap and trade, or some other mechanism, this (and lots more) is required to hit accord targets. As in Holland, agriculture has to be severely limited as well so 40% across the board means exactly what it says. Since there is simply no other way, If you're in favour the Paris Accord you are, by extension, in favour of these actions. I've repeatedly asked greenies what sectors of the economy they want to see cut in support of their goals to no avail, it now seems the government has decided for them. The reality of it all is pretty brutal, after we've completely wrecked our economy we will have succeeded in lowering our percentage of world wide carbon emissions by about 0.5%. Missing in all the discussions is the fact that our land mass scrubs more carbon then we actually produce. For the hunters in the crowd, it's like shooting mice with 405 grain 45-70 ammo, it certainly gets the job done but at a cost most reasonable people would consider foolish given other alternatives... like a cat. Like covid mandates, travel restrictions and the appetite to surrender hard won rights in the interests of a level of safety we never achieved, I'm actually pleased to say that none of this makes sense to me at any level. Please carry on without me, I'm too busy putting up a chain link fence to keep mosquitos off the property to pay attention to this anymore.
    2 points
  23. Indeed. In the beginning, it seemed pretty simple to me... at risk people and those who felt they would benefit from being vaccinated could consider the options (safety/efficacy) and made the best choice for themselves. That's a good thing, it's the Canada I use to know... Fast forward a bit and you have 70% of the population in favour of having their neighbours fired and 37% thinking unvaccinated people should be interned. That's unhinged in my view and its created lasting animosities and family breakups among people who can't even discuss the issue at a high school biology level. In the end, I think (but don't know), that most people don't remember what you did or what you said, they remember how you made them feel when you did it or said it. Assuming that holds true for others (and not just me), those animosities will be long lived and as costly as they were unnecessary. IMO, we lost a lot (actually gave it away) and gained little in the bargain.
    2 points
  24. A letter to the editor with an opinion on why our sockboy pm is flitting around the country doing photo ops:
    2 points
  25. We have so many weak and ineffective ministers in so many departments. The only rational explanation I can think of is they don't want anyone to appear brighter than JT. That sets the bar awful low.
    2 points
  26. Good tale. Those were the real wonder years I think.
    2 points
  27. LMAO ! He had ONE thing going for him…his image…. and then he does this https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11019839/Canadas-Justin-Trudeau-shows-new-haircut-cancels-visit-brewery.html
    2 points
  28. https://www.airlineratings.com/news/passenger-news/airlineratings-com-names-top-ten-low-cost-airlines-2022/ AIRLINERATINGS.COM NAMES ITS TOP TEN LOW COST AIRLINES FOR 2022 by AirlineRatings.com Editors July 14, 2022 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The high public interest in affordable travel has prompted AirlineRatings.com, the world’s only safety, product, and COVID rating website, to identify the top ten low-cost airlines for 2022 from the almost 400 airlines it rates. Best Low-Cost Airlines – Top 10 The AirlineRatings top 10 LCCs for 2022 are, in alphabetical order: Allegiant Air, AirAsia, EasyJet, Jetstar, Flair, Fly Dubai, Ryanair, Scoot, Southwest and VietJet Air. Airlineratings.com Editor-in-Chief Geoffrey Thomas said that “each of these airlines has a good safety record and has made a big difference in their respective markets.” “From Southwest Airlines which started the low-cost revolution in the 1970s to Flair which redefines the low-cost product, each airline has made a huge contribution to affordable travel.” “In Europe, it’s Easyjet and Ryanair, in Asia/Pacific AirAsia, Jetstar and Scoot, while in the Americas one can add Flair, Frontier and Spirit, to Southwest. All are standouts.” All the airlines chosen have either good safety and incident records or have completed the International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit (IOSA).
    2 points
  29. Air Canada Foundation’s 10th Annual Golf Tournament Nets More Than $1 Million for Children and Youth Health and Well-Being
    2 points
  30. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-that-sound-you-hear-could-be-the-country-fragmenting I think Rex is asking the wrong questions here. The only real question is "do you want to hit the Paris Accord targets?" If you say yes, then the things JT is doing and proposing (plus much more) need to be done. Not only that, if you have been paying the slightest bit of attention to the issue, and doing some grade 4 arithmetic along the way, you know it. Vote on policy.... anyone surprised by any of this simply wasn't paying attention. There is more to come too, this isn't enough. I'll ask again but pose the question differently.... what other sectors of the Canadian economy do you want to see cut in support of accord target goals or do you just want JT to pick them for you? We are now at a point that failure to answer the first part means you have selected the latter.
    1 point
  31. Regarding Trudeau’s Bill C-11. Censoring free speech https://www.sasktoday.ca/north/opinion/opinion-the-trudeau-government-is-on-a-quest-for-censorship-5501621
    1 point
  32. That's a big problem IMO. When it comes to working together, farmers are a rudderless ship... they're independent by nature and because they have to be to survive in a tough industry. I sometimes wonder if as individuals they even realize the power they wield as a group... but only as a group. Imagine trying to get them to plow their fields under and euthanize livestock at a time most are already hanging on by a thread. The numbers are huge, the margins are small and most are loath to risk farms that have been in their families for generations. Protests are easy but ultimate victory requires risking all. I'm not sure how you could get them all pulling in the same direction. I suspect it would be like getting consumers to boycott their provincial liquor stores during the summer to protest high beer prices.
    1 point
  33. Yes you did….but she’s special
    1 point
  34. I think so too, I'm stocking up... My goodness, I wonder how many Democrats are saying "oooops" right now? I previously didn't think Trump would make it through the primaries (if he ran)... that's changed now. Even moderate Republicans will see this as weaponizing the third arm of the unholy trinity and regardless of outcome, a new precedent has been set. Democrats will soon find themselves doped into a reticle of their own design and those moderate Republicans, who would have previously objected to it on principle and for the sake of unity, now won't. In fact, they're eagerly awaiting their turn at bat now.
    1 point
  35. I thought the Charter would protect our rights during the pandemic. I was wrong By Joanna Baron When the New York Times ran a feature encouraging its writers to admit things they got wrong, we were equally intrigued and annoyed. What a great idea — why didn’t we think of that?! That’s exactly the spirit we want to encourage at The Hub. We know we won’t be right about everything, but we want to admit it when we get something wrong and we want to figure out why we were off base. So, this week, we’ll be borrowing the Times’ idea and running essays from our writers and staff about the things we got wrong. Please, enjoy our blunders. I entered the legal profession during what was a sort of zenith of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. During the years of the so-called Bedford trilogy (from 2013-2016), s. 7 of the Charter—which protects the right to life, liberty, and security of the person—expanded to encompass rights to safe injection sites, medically assisted death, and brothels. The Court told us pointedly: if a single Canadian’s rights were harmed by an impugned law, that was sufficient to strike the law down as unconstitutional. So as the contours of government response to the pandemic—vaccine passports, extended lockdowns, mandates, mandatory quarantines—came into focus in late 2020 and early 2021, I was cautiously bullish on the viability of the most serious claims under the Charter. Of course, some restrictions on rights for valid public health objectives were understandable. But the sorts of laws that vividly and severely impacted the core liberties, even dignity, of individuals could not simply be swept under the rug of s. 1 indefinitely and justified in light of the government’s self-professed exigent circumstances. In particular, cases where the government failed to provide compassionate exemptions for its most draconian measures should be accommodated or the law struck down under the Charter. I was wrong. In summer 2021, the Canadian Constitution Foundation along with several individuals brought an application against the government in relation to its quarantine hotel measures which required all returning travellers to isolate in an approved hotel for three days at a cost of about $2,000. The applicants, all of modest means, each needed to travel outside of Canada either to care for parents suffering from terminal conditions or, in one case, care for an injured spouse. The expense itself was crushing for these individuals. But also, the public health justification for the hotels was flimsy. In spring 2021, the federal government’s own expert advisory panel recommended discontinuing the hotel program, as it was unlikely to have any effect on the spread of the virus. Striking down the program seemed to clearly follow from the Charter’s guarantees if they were to have any teeth. Instead, in his decision the judge summarily dismissed the claim, deriding the matters raised as concerning “decidedly first world, economic problems.” He did not find any breach of any of the Charter rights asserted (including the right to mobility and the right to life, liberty, and security of the person). This posture of extreme deference was the norm throughout the pandemic (even bans on a church holding drive-in services were upheld). It was predictable that governments, responding to public pressure, would overshoot the mark and act according to the precautionary principle in setting policies. Throughout the pandemic, nearly all health measures polled well. It fell to judges to hold up the principle that, as Robert Nozick says, “Individuals have rights, and there are things no person or group may make them do.” A constitution is meant to demarcate acceptable from unacceptable state conduct, not act as a sort of grab bag of contingent interests. If a right is little more than one norm or interest to be weighed against others, and the government’s reasoning for its actions is deferred to across the board, the Charter is nothing but a lame duck showpiece. I thought the Charter would be a sturdy bulwark against rights intrusions throughout the pandemic. I was wrong.
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  36. Interesting how PC. works it way into our daily life. eg. the Head Line is " Cougar euthanized after child attacked over August long weekend" Not so long ago the headline would have likely have been: "Cougar hunted down, shot and killed after child attacked over August Long Weekend" To use the term "euthanized" is simply to sugar coat the truth and spare some folks tender feelings and is rather dumb. Likely the same folks who consume meat but refuse to come to grips on how the meat comes to their table.
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  37. Can’t say this wasn’t expected or forewarned! Great interview in the article. Beef prices set to surge further as farmers sell off cattle herds More breeding stock is being sent to the sale barn amid soaring input costs and drought conditions https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/beef-prices-set-surge-further-farmers-sell-cattle-herds?intcmp=fb_fnc&fbclid=IwAR3RysLrwhEaXe8sm31WtL4H-gJ22Hr6d5_0Mzo1Qt-U10A_rR_lwhOLtog
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  38. From the Main Stream Media: Reinfection, severe outcome more common with BA.5 variant; virus spike protein toxic to heart cells July 28 (Reuters) - The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They include research that warrants further study to corroborate the findings and that has yet to be certified by peer review. Reinfections, severe outcomes may be more common with BA.5 Compared with the earlier Omicron BA.2 subvariant, currently dominant Omicron BA.5 is linked with higher odds of causing a second SARS-COV-2 infection regardless of vaccination status, a study from Portugal suggests. From late April through early June, researchers there studied 15,396 adults infected with the BA.2 variant and 12,306 infected with BA.5. Vaccines and boosters were equally effective against both sublineages, according to a report posted on Monday on medRxiv ahead of peer review. However, 10% of BA.5 cases were reinfections, compared to 5.6% of BA.2 cases, which suggests a reduction in protection conferred by previous infection against BA.5 compared to BA.2, the researchers said. Moreover, the vaccines appeared to be less effective in reducing the risk of severe outcomes for BA.5 compared with BA.2. "Among those infected with BA.5, booster vaccination was associated with 77% and 88% reduction in risk of COVID-19 hospitalization and death, respectively, while higher risk reduction was found for BA.2 cases, with 93% and 94%, respectively," the researchers wrote. While "COVID-19 booster vaccination still offers substantial protection against severe outcomes following BA.5 infection," they said, their findings provide "evidence to adjust public health measures during the BA.5 surge." Virus spike protein damages heart muscle cells The spike protein on its surface that the coronavirus uses to break into heart muscle cells also triggers a damaging attack from the immune system, according to new research. The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein interacts with other proteins in cardiac myocytes to cause inflammation, researchers said on Wednesday in a presentation at the American Heart Association's Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions 2022. In experiments with mice hearts, comparing the effects of SARS-CoV2 spike proteins and spike proteins from a different, relatively harmless coronavirus, the researchers found that only the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein caused heart dysfunction, enlargement, and inflammation. Further, they found, in infected heart muscle cells only the SARS-CoV-2 spike interacted with so-called TLR4 proteins (Toll-like receptor-4) that recognize invaders and trigger inflammatory responses. In a deceased patient with COVID-19 inflammation, the researchers found the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and TLR4 protein in both heart muscle cells and other cell types. Both were absent in a biopsy of a healthy human heart. "That means once the heart is infected with SARS-CoV-2, it will activate the TLR4 signaling," Zhiqiang Lin of the Masonic Medical Research Institute in Utica, New York said in a statement. "We provided direct evidence that spike protein is toxic to the heart muscle cells and narrowed down the underlying mechanism as spike protein directly inflames the heart muscle cells," he told Reuters. "More work is being done in my lab to test whether and how spike protein kills heart muscle cells." Omicron-targeted antibody combo nears human trials A new monoclonal antibody combination can prevent and treat Omicron infections in monkeys, researchers reported on Monday in Nature Microbiology. The antibodies, called P2G3 and P5C3, recognize specific regions of the spike protein the SARS-CoV-2 virus uses to enter cells. "P5C3 alone can block all SARS-CoV-2 variants that had dominated the pandemic up to Omicron BA.2," said Dr. Didier Trono of the Swiss Institute of Technology in Lausanne. "P2G3 then comes to the rescue as it not only can neutralize all previous SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, but it can also block BA.4 and BA.5," he said. "P2G3 is even effective against some BA.2 or BA.4/BA.5 mutants capable of escaping (Eli Lilly's (LLY.N)) bebtelovimab, the only antibody approved for the clinics still displaying activity against the currently dominant BA.4/BA.5 subvariants." In lab experiments, mutations that might make SARS-CoV-2 variants resistant to P2G3 did not allow escape from P5C3, and P5C3 escape mutants were still blocked by P2G3, Trono said. "In essence, the two antibodies cover for each other, one filling in for the lapses of the other and vice versa." Aerium Therapeutics plans to start testing the combination in humans next month, said Trono, who is among the company's founders. If larger trials eventually confirm its effectiveness, the P5C3/P2G3 combination will be given by injection every three-to-six months to people who are immunocompromised and do not have a strong response to COVID-19 vaccines, the company has said. Click for a Reuters Global COVID-19 Tracker and for a Reuters COVID-19 Vaccination Tracker.
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  39. We've reached a tipping point with 'tip creep' When you grab your own sandwich from a cooler and bus your own table, you shouldn’t be pressured to tip 15 per cent, or more I was in a grocery the other day buying milk, when the bored-looking server turned his credit card machine toward me, displaying the choice of a 15, 20 or 25 per cent tip. This for grabbing my own two litres of milk from the fridge and having the clerk point the credit card machine my way. In essence, I would be tipping him for asking for a tip. It’s a fast-growing trend nowadays as we’re pressed to tip everywhere from groceries, bakeries and fast food places to some car repair shops. Practically the only places not asking for tips yet are ATM machines, but I’m sure the banks are working on it. Everyone else is. What next? Asking for tips at self-serve gas stations, where they should be tipping us? Tipping has always been complex. We do it in restaurants, hotels and taxis, but not supermarkets; we tip hairdressers and pedicurists, not shoe salesmen. Sommeliers make four times the tip for opening a $120 bottle of wine as for a $30 one that takes identical labour. I’ve always believed in tipping service people generously, but lately it’s a reflex I have to suppress, because absolutely everyone wants a big tip. I didn’t want to fumble again, so I guiltily pushed the 15 per cent option for wasting the server’s time, but only when I left did I realize: “Wow! I just left a $4 tip for bread.” Some of this “tip creep” started during COVID-19 when restaurants only served takeout, and employees were stressed out and facing some stubbornly unvaccinated, unmasked munchers. So we all contributed more to newly appreciated front-line workers by leaving better tips, a kind of hero’s hazard pay for keeping the world going in an era of germ terror. It’s been dubbed the Great Pandemic Tipping Boom of 2020. But though the pandemic has eased up, tips keep creeping up and we may have reached a tipping point. Adding to tip creep, cash has practically disappeared, replaced everywhere from farmers’ markets to food trucks by tiny, smartphone-linked card terminals that automatically ask for minimum 15 per cent tips. Recently at a Plateau bakery, I ordered three breads and a frozen quiche, and the screen showed 15 to 30 per cent tip options. There wasn’t an option for “no tip,” but there was a lineup behind me, so I scrambled to hit a key that said “other amount.” I didn’t have my reading glasses, so I peered at the new menu’s multiple options for too long and the machine froze. The clerk had to redo my bill and hand back the machine. I sensed grumbling behind me in line, as if I were buying 14 lottery tickets whose numbers I was deciding on, while carefully factoring in the date, my lucky numbers and my Zodiac birth sign. Again, there’s almost never a “no tip” option. You have to look for “custom amount,” usually under the guilt-inducing gaze of the employee you’re considering whether to tip. Once you tip, the machines often flash programmed messages like “BRILLIANT!” for 25 per cent, “EXCELLENT!” for 20 and “OK” for anything less. There are even reports that some garages and plumbers have requested 15 per cent and higher tips on $2,800 repair bills (that’s at least $420). Expect car salesmen to follow, requesting 20 per cent tips on a $32,000 new vehicle. Now that electronic tipping’s become routine, many underpaid cashiers insist employers keep the onscreen tip option. I don’t blame them, but I also feel it’s the employers’ job to pay them to ring up the cash, not mine. We should tip service people well for their work, especially waiters who earn about $3 less ($11.40) than the hourly Quebec minimum wage ($14.25) since they’re expected to compensate with tips. They work hard and remain cheerful with often demanding customers who probably drive their spouses crazy. Likewise for expert latte makers, hard-pressed kitchen staff, dishwashers, busboys and bartenders. But when you grab your own sandwich from a cooler and bus your own table, you shouldn’t be pressured to tip 15 per cent, or more. We should tip delivery people well, too, along with barbers, tattoo artists and other personal services. But when you’ve lugged a 24-pack of beer to the dep cash, it’s crazy to be asked for a $4 tip. It used to be easy to drop 50 cents in a tip jar on the counter for a coffee, but those are disappearing as fast as cash, replaced by automated screen tips. At the jazz fest I bought an ice cream bar from an outdoor vendor for $6.75 and would normally have left the 25 cents change. But none of the vendors took cash anymore, so I was faced with the usual 15 per cent request, for him handing me the bar — and I declined. In the future, I’ll try to carry a plastic pouch of cash around — and if someone doesn’t want my loonie, I’ll just tip myself. Thank you for reading. Choose one of the following tip options: $5 … $500 … $5,000. $5,000? BRILLIANT! National Post
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  40. Entire Police Force In NC Town Resigns In Protest Of ‘Progressive’ Town Manager The entire police force in a North Carolina town – including the veteran chief – resigned Thursday over a new town manager who calls herself “progressively responsible.” Kenly Police Chief Josh Gibson wrote in a Facebook post he and all five of his officers as well as two other town officials quit in protest of Justine Jones. Jones, who became town manager last month, has created a “hostile work environment,” Gibson claimed. “I have put in my 2 weeks notice along with the whole police dept.,” wrote Gibson, who has been on Kenly’s force for 21 years. “The new manager has created an environment I do not feel we can perform our duties and services to the community.” Gibson did not specify what his beef was with Jones, who started the job on June 2 after what the town called a “nationwide search.” The news release announcing her hiring lauded her for having “worked in progressively responsible positions” in several states. It did not mention that Jones had sued a prior employer, Richland County, S.C., for gender and racial discrimination after she was fired in 2015, according to WRAL. The suit was later dismissed. https://www.dailywire.com/news/entire-police-force-in-nc-town-resigns-in-protest-of-progressive-town-manager?utm_campaign=dw_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=housefile&utm_content=non_member
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  41. Karma can really bite sometimes. Not that the guy feels anything close to shame.
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  42. Simple answer. The emergence and blind acceptance of "woke"
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  43. He appears to be avoiding any possible conflict (of course he is only mirroring what he has done for months in Parliament) or because of no photo opportunity. Trudeau event at brewery cancelled as apparent convoy protesters set up outside About a dozen protesters gathered across the street from the brewery, including one who was carrying a flag emblazoned with a profanity directed at Trudeau, and another who was recording the establishment on their phone.
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