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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/22/2019 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    VS; Yes, I call it internet social media hyperventilation. It is inappropriate to hearken to millions of shrill, largely anonymous voices who conflate opinion with facts, in the face of what is already known; it is even worse to do so when nothing is known yet as is occurring in the present case.
  2. 4 points
    Agreed. The scale of abuse and harassment in the workplace is almost too large to define, which is why cases like this are so often met with disbelief and reframing as entirely part of some other agenda. IMO, there is importance here that affects nearly everyone, whether employed or not, regardless of gender, race, age or creed. The common root is the misuse of power and abject entitlement to abuse someone who is vulnerable. Whether that abuse is sexual harassment, isolating someone so their concerns are not taken seriously, racial profiling, you name it - it's wrong and inflicts, sometimes life long or life ending harm. It gets further complicated when someone who has a secondary agenda also happens to have a valid point. It is all too easy to see the agenda and dismiss everything. That has been the path of least resistance for too long. Perhaps times are changing. Let's hope. Vs
  3. 3 points
    My neighbor, while stationed in Colorado Springs was a Spectre Gunship Commander (C-130) in Vietnam.....said he could put 50 rounds through your bathroom window from 10, 000 feet. He was a retired L/Col USAF and his hobby was repairing worn washers and dryers. He would have 6-8 machines on his driveway every day tearing them apart and rebuilding them. He took mine and gave me a pair of refurbished machines.......the next day he was over and asked if the next time I flew to Canada if I could bring him back a set of those screwdrivers that fit those damned square holed screws
  4. 3 points
    Another lighter moment, taking a poke at a fave...
  5. 3 points
    27 February – TS 108 YUL-ADZ Online check-in was no problem but the UL airport could use a clear and concise sign near the AT check-in area that states where PERSONS WHO HAVE UTILIZED ONLINE CHECK-IN NEED TO GO TO CHECK BAGGAGE. Two of the persons I talked to kept trying to get me to check back in at a kiosk even though I showed them I had already done an online check in. I finally found the correct area. A simple sign would certainly help The flight down was extremely enjoyable, great cabin crew who interacted with the pax in a very amiable way. Pre- departure PA from pilots was much too fast and hard to understand. Pre-landing PA merely stated an ETA, no temp or “out the window you can see” info. Was a very nice clear day, very light winds, and the main area of the small island is easily view-able when lined up for landing on the NE runway… 14 March –TS 109 ADZ –YUL Air Transat sends update text messages as the date your flight approaches. AT states that online check-in is available. It also states that two hard copies of your boarding pass should be printed out. I was fortunate that I knew the admin persons in the Dive Shop and managed to Air-Print from my IOS and get two hard copies. Checked in at the airport and it was quite obvious that there was absolutely no advantage to doing and online check-in because the airport staff do not have the technology that is available in other places. I handed in one of my boarding passes and Passport…….waited…..waited….and got back the normal thin cardboard boarding pass that was IDENTICAL to my printed out boarding pass. Again at the gate it was obvious that the technology was not yet in place as the agents could not read an IOS with the encrypted boarding pass installed…they wanted the newly issued paper pass. Once again, outstanding service from the cabin crew….appreciated by all Pre-departure PA from the cockpit was very informative and even advised the pax why we stopped taxiing and that we would have to wait for an aircraft to land prior to being able to move onto the runway. Pre-arrival PA was very good….only forgot to mention the local time and that there was a one hour time change between ADZ and YUL (Canada was now on DL Savings Time). THEY ARE STILL OUT THERE Below you will find a pic of lady waiting at the boarding gate for the flight from ADZ to YUL. There are always people who want to get on-board first and I don’t know why when pax are supposed to be boarded by assigned seat rows….(perhaps they want to get the choice of overhead bins ), anyhow…as I sat there I noticed her bag had a “Carry On Baggage” tag. After thinking about it…I finally went up to the lady and explained that the bag was much too big for Carry-On baggage..(I estimated 3 feet x 2 feet x 1 foot). She was adamant that the bag was going on as Carry On baggage.. I certainly wasn’t going to argue with her, I merely pointed out that it probably wouldn’t be allowed and I wished her luck. Well we started boarding and she was about number 5 through the gate and I was about number 15-20. Shortly after we started down the ramp to the tarmac..(air-stairs boarding), the line halted then moved again slowly past the Francophone lady shouting at the Avianca agent about her bag going up the air-stairs to the cabin. (Broken English with a touch of French and Spanish) As I looked back I saw the agent dragging her bag to the starboard side of the aircraft and heading for the belt that went into the aft cargo hold….. I guess some people just don’t get it.
  6. 3 points
    1700 AAE would not be low for an acceleration/flap retraction altitude. The minimum altitude can be as low as 400' but I am not aware of anyone who does that. Normally the primary restriction driving that acceleration altitude is terrain clearance and minimum all engines obstacle clearance planes. Most of the time, on all engines, a twin will handily outclimb that gradient once the gear is up, but the acceleration to get the flaps up, especially from a high hot airport, can involve an extended and relatively flat flight path which may punch through that gradient. So basically the aircraft has to climb high enough, early enough, to buy room for that acceleration phase. Vs
  7. 3 points
    Hopefully the FAA & TC, (and that should include the NTSB and the TSB), know something if this is a consideration? A ban, if any, should be based upon data from the Ethiopian accident, period. If there is nothing new to say regarding the Ethiopian accident and the reasons are understood, then a grounding is unnecessary.
  8. 3 points
    I’ve got a pain in my ass.....will he apologize for that?
  9. 3 points
    Kind of an odd set of questions but if you’ve read any of the details on her case starting with the alleged event in 2010, you would know she has been fighting for her day in court for quite some time. Westjet and their legal team have wanted this to go away but she hasn’t given up. As the father and husband of women who have both been sexually harassed in the workplace, yes I do have an interest in the outcome of Lewis’s story. My wife was an assistant buyer with company headquartered in Toronto and it was her first job after university. Immediately after the incident she walked into the HR office and resigned. They quickly scrambled and moved her to a different department. The person involved was never questioned about any of it and nothing was ever done. In my daughter’s case she just quit. Hard to fight/stay when it was the owner of the company. Also her first job out of university and she had no choice but to leave. I hope ILB that nothing like Lewis’s case ever happens to anyone you know or care about. It can be devastating and totally destroy you.
  10. 2 points
    ‎Today, ‎March ‎22, ‎2019, ‏‎31 minutes ago Wilson-Raybould to provide emails, texts and written statement on SNC-Lavalin affair ‎Today, ‎March ‎22, ‎2019, ‏‎31 minutes ago | CBC News Jody Wilson-Raybould says she will provide a written statement and copies of text messages and emails to the Commons justice committee that shut down its probe into the SNC-Lavalin affair.
  11. 2 points
    Regarding AOA and who has what feature. I find the press coverage interesting. Air Canada has a more comprehensive installation, yet the press articles start with 'Air Canada and Westjet' and downplay the role of the AOA indication. I have to wonder, if the situation was reversed, would we see, 'Air Canada lacks important safety component'? And nothing from Sunwing. Hmm. IMO the AOA indication's value depends a bit on the aircraft envelope. The Citation I flew a million years ago had it, and it was a straight wing aircraft. Far from being a distraction, I found it provided a great immediate reference in a number of situations. For the MAX, the AOA location just becomes one more scan item. The pilots I have spoken with about it have no issues and are generally happy it's there. Given what we now know about the link between AOA and unexpected aircraft behaviour, just having an 'AOA disagree' without an immediate visual indication of which AOA is saying what, that creates a period of confusion as to whether the failure is on the low side or the high. Finally, the AOA indication is not going to be a distraction during an MCAS firing. What it IS going to do is warn the pilots of an impending problem while they are still configured (flaps not yet retracted) so they can decide on a mitigation up front (leave the flaps out for a bit perhaps, so delay acceleration, get some altitude or stay configured and return, etc). AOA indications are a good thing. The customers who shelled out on their own to install them should get a credit from Boeing when the rest of the world gets them for free. Finally, as soon as Boeing and the regulators start rolling out the fix, the grounding should shift from total airspace bans to unmodified aircraft and crew. If we don't recognise investment in additional layers of safety, that investment will not continue, human nature being what it is. The reasons for this grounding are ample proof of that sad fact. All just my opinion. Vs
  12. 2 points
    For all of MSNBC’s flaws, and there are many, at least Democrats are not played for fools by that far-left outlet. Unlike CNN, which insults its audience with its laughable pose as objective, MSNBC makes no secret of its left-wing biases.
  13. 2 points
    In my case, I agree,....I know a few folks where their DC was run by an idiot and they lost a very significant amount..... both plans are totally acceptable, but must be Properly Run..
  14. 2 points
    Wrong!!!! You can never win an argument with a Liberal.
  15. 2 points
    https://www.facebook.com/669514516/posts/10158449515914517?sfns=mo To all the school kids going on 'strike' for Climate Change: You are the first generation who have required air-conditioning in every classroom. You want TV in every room and your classes are all computerized . You spend all day and night on electronic devices. More than ever, you don't walk or ride bikes to school but arrive in caravans of private cars that choke local roads and worsen rush hour traffic. You are the biggest consumers of manufactured goods ever and update perfectly good expensive luxury items to stay trendy, Your entertainment comes from electric devices. Furthermore, the people driving your protests are the same people who insist on artificially inflating the population growth through immigration, which increases the need for energy, manufacturing and transport. The more people we have, the more forest and bushland we clear and more of the environment is destroyed. How about this... Tell your teachers to switch off the air-con. Walk or ride to school. Switch off your devices and read a book. Make a sandwich instead of buying manufactured fast food. No, none of this will happen because you are selfish, badly educated, virtue signalling little 'princesses', inspired by the adults around you who crave a feeling of having a 'noble cause' while they indulge themselves in Western luxury and unprecedented quality of life. Wake up, grow up and learn to research facts and think for yourself and not blindly accept the words and thoughts of others - I don't think you formulated this action plan all by your self - suspect you may have had some influence and 'guidance' from those you trust ....a word of warning, be cautious of the influence of the 'left' because there may be a time in the future that you will be the ones left out...
  16. 2 points
    blues, good picking indeed. I think any examination of the matter before FAA & Boeing needs to include the subject of "type" and the overriding priority of "commonality" in cockpits. There are good reasons and good ways for permitting crews to operate different types. Swissair had crews flying A320's & A330's. I believe some are doing B767 & B777 cross-qualification, (someone can verify, perhaps). Any conclusion to this is going to have to find ways of convincing the flying public that a "grounded" airplane that was perfectly safe prior to grounding is perfectly safe to return to service. As another said, there is no way back, because there was no legitimate, reasonable way into the grounding that hasn't been addressed by the FAA/Boeing documents of December 2018. The disturbingly-comfortable relationship between the FAA and Boeing also requires an examination and not just an investigation. I keep pushing Vaughan's book because it actually made a difference at NASA after Columbia. It is absolutely necessary here if Boeing is not to have another, similiar matter on their hands, because right now, they and the FAA are broken and it is not merely an instrumental solution that can fix them.
  17. 2 points
    Sully nailed it. Cadet programs may work when everything goes according to the plan, but throw someone with 200 hours an aircraft that feels like it's out of control and you will almost surely get a "deer in the headlights" response.
  18. 2 points
    Sully comments... Captain C.B. Sully Sullenberger 16 hours ago We do not yet know what caused the tragic crash of Ethiopian 302 that sadly claimed the lives of all passengers and crew, though there are many similarities between this flight and Lion Air 610, in which the design of the Boeing 737 MAX 8 is a factor. It has been obvious since the Lion Air crash that a redesign of the 737 MAX 8 has been urgently needed, yet has still not been done, and the announced proposed fixes do not go far enough. I feel sure that the Ethiopian crew would have tried to do everything they were able to do to avoid the accident. It has been reported that the first officer on that flight had only 200 hours of flight experience, a small fraction of the minimum in the U.S., and an absurdly low amount for someone in the cockpit of a jet airliner. We do not yet know what challenges the pilots faced or what they were able to do, but everyone who is entrusted with the lives of passengers and crew by being in a pilot seat of an airliner must be armed with the knowledge, skill, experience, and judgment to be able to handle the unexpected and be the absolute master of the aircraft and all its systems, and of the situation. A cockpit crew must be a team of experts, not a captain and an apprentice. In extreme emergencies, when there is not time for discussion or for the captain to direct every action of the first officer, pilots must be able to intuitively know what to do to work together. They must be able to collaborate wordlessly. Someone with only 200 hours would not know how to do that or even to do that. Someone with that low amount of time would have only flown in a closely supervised, sterile training environment, not the challenging and often ambiguous real world of operational flying, would likely never have experienced a serious aircraft malfunction, would have seen only one cycle of the seasons of the year as a pilot, one spring with gusty crosswinds, one summer of thunderstorms. If they had learned to fly in a fair-weather clime, they might not even have flown in a cloud. Airlines have a corporate obligation not to put pilots in that position of great responsibility before they are able to be fully ready. While we don’t know what role, if any, pilot experience played in this most recent tragedy, it should always remain a top priority at every airline. Everyone who flies depends upon it. https://www.foxnews.com/us/hero-pilot-who-landed-plane-in-hudson-river-blasts-pilot-training-in-wake-of-ethiopian-airlines-crash
  19. 2 points
    Of course Eddie would see it that way......a little perspective, please. Eddie was Chrétien’s right hand man that brought us the Sponsorship scandal. Liberal spin doctors at work...nothing to see here other than obstruction of justice by the PM.
  20. 2 points
    PARIS (Reuters) - France’s air accident investigation agency BEA will analysis black-box flight recorders from a Boeing 737 MAX 8 which crashed near Addis Ababa on Sunday, a spokesman said. Ethiopian Airlines said earlier it would send the two cockpit voice and data recorders abroad for analysis. The French announcement resolved uncertainty over the fate of the two recorders after Germany’s BFU said it had declined a request to handle them because it could not process the new type of recorder used on the 737 MAX jets, in service since 2017. The BEA is one of the world’s most active air crash agencies alongside the National Transportation Safety Board of the United States and has laboratories at its Le Bourget headquarters.
  21. 2 points
    The 737 MAx is referred to as a state of the art modern aircraft that is less than 2 years old in many articles I have read. This always makes me chuckle since it is far from the actual truth. While I have only sat in on a few systems seminars on the aircraft, the information I took away from those is that the MAX is simply makeup on a pig. The systems integration on the aircraft is, simply put, patches on a raft. They had a system and then "integrated" (I would call it interfacing) another system on top of it. Plug a glass cockpit in there and it sure looks whiz bank but behind the scenes the steam engine is still driving the ship. This addition of system over system actually over complicates the systems integration on the aircraft. Had they taken the time (and money) to completely redesign the systems on the aircraft to a more modern standard (Think FBW) with actual digital electronics running the show then these issues would not exist. The MCAS System was added to the aircraft in order to get the MAX certified. They changed the design (engine size, weight, location) and needed to compensate. So they added a "patch". As we all know patches are never as strong as the original material. I would say that in this case the patch has a flaw. The problem is the flaw, when it shows itself, needs to be identified and dealt with. Actually a simple task with just 2 switches involved. IMHO the MAX is not the aircraft Boeing should have built, it was just the easiest to compete with Airbus and, then, Bombardier. They could have kept the basic design but built a better aircraft. Sometimes the shortcut is the longer route.
  22. 2 points
    Hmmm. Doesn't MCAS require autopilot to be off? I'm wondering if these reports were about a different condition Vs
  23. 2 points
    Interesting, boestar, thank you for posting. So the system is installed, and one must buy it like one buys a higher MTOW & MLW, etc. I agree with your cautions regarding causing other issues. I doubt very much whether knowing the AoA of their aircraft would have prevented the loss of AF447, for example. While AoA is a key indicator of the "health of the wing" so to speak, long-established SOPs have kept transport aircraft and their crews out of trouble for decades and millions of hours, and that is a statistic that needs respecting in the sense that it is successful. I didn't realize until yesterday that the MCAS uses both AoA data sources; rather, I am informed, the FCC which controls the MCAS, alternates each leg, much like say, "A" & "B" ignition systems or #1 & #2 cabin pressure controllers etc., might be alternated. To me that has huge implications - it means comparison is possible right away and so is presentation of the data for the respective PFDs. It begs the question asked since last October, "If the data was wrong, why was it used?", which in turn begs the question, was rejecting wrong data and switching to a more rational source, (appropriate for the state of the aircraft given other available inputs) think even more important is the comparator & warning function. BTW, almost certainly, there is nothing that can go wrong with the actual, physical AoA sensor. To send a reading of "+20deg", it would have to be physically stuck in that position. So the source for the incorrect data (for 610) is elsewhere, and may be here, too.
  24. 2 points
    Well they certainly don't have Einstein for a president.
  25. 2 points
    Wow! I never thought I'd see the U.K. join in on this ban.
  26. 2 points
    “The NTSB says there is a “lack of a means” for crews to detect a jammed elevator during pre-flight checks on the type.“ Really? That surprises me. What’s the control check consist of on this type?
  27. 2 points
    Corporations are starting to aim content directly at readers of social media when they believe conventional media have wronged them But frankly, I can't remember another article savaging the media quite like this https://bbdtruenorth.com/postings/canadian-aerospace-industry-reaches-new-heights-while-the-globe-and-mail-goes-to-new-low Canadian Aerospace Industry Reaches New Heights, While the Globe and Mail Goes to New Low March 07, 2019 Mike Nadolski Anyone up for some good news about a Canadian business? Bombardier just announced that its new business aircraft – the Global 7500 – set a record for the longest non-stop flight by a business jet – over 8,150 nautical miles. Actually, that’s more than just good. It’s amazing. Our new aircraft has the longest range, the largest cabin and smoothest ride of any business jet ever made. Its reach can take it from Toronto, over the North Pole at nearly supersonic speed, and arrive in Hong Kong without refueling, carrying more passengers in an extra-spacious cabin that has no rival. Here’s the best part. The plane was conceived, designed, manufactured, and first flown right here in Canada. It represents the best of Canadian engineering prowess and craftsmanship and is shining proof that Canadian companies can compete and win in global competition. Our country can take great pride in this historic achievement and no one deserves the recognition more than the thousands of Canadian workers, from the test pilots to mechanics to engineers and electricians, whose determined effort made it possible. Yet, all too often that work and their stories go untold. A recent poll showed that less than a quarter of the public even knew the Global 7500 aircraft exists. Fewer know about the leading role Bombardier plays in the adoption of sustainable alternative jet fuels, a part of our commitment to preserving the skies which we have the privilege of flying through. Or, that Bombardier has continued to invest billions of dollars in its business jets segment over the last five years, driving new products, Canadian patents and sustained employment. If all this sounds remarkable, the real surprise is the narrow way our country’s news media has covered Canada’s business aviation industry. Think about it. How often do you hear about the billions of dollars business jet sales bring into the Canadian economy? Did you know that there are barely enough seats in the Rogers Centre (Skydome) to fit all the people whose livelihoods are linked to Canada’s business aviation industry? A cynic might say it is because the media isn’t interested in good news stories or that they are so fixated on villainizing corporations and wealthy individuals who use business jets that they can’t bring themselves to say anything positive about the industry. Worse yet is the dishonest attempt to discredit the women and men of Bombardier and paint our company as an organization that prowls the globe offering sweetheart deals to shadowy characters with disregard for the law and our reputation. This latest sorry example of cheap shot journalism was on full display in a recent Globe & Mail article. In this article, Globe reporter Mark MacKinnon – who has been previously called out by Canada’s National News Media Council for failing to meet basic journalism standards in his reporting of our company – suggests that newly “leaked” records from a now defunct Lithuanian Bank show a “tie” between a Russian tax fraud scheme and a decade old business jet sale. MacKinnon further suggests that this apparent connection implies flaws in our due diligence process. Putting aside the absurd standard of perfect hindsight, to which the Globe attempts to hold Bombardier, readers are deprived of critical information and context necessary to understand the full story. So, once again we must set the record straight on behalf of our employees. Let’s start with the fact that Bombardier conducts a robust due diligence on potential buyers of every aircraft we sell. In some cases we move forward. In others we decline. Simply put, we do what we believe is right based on the information available at that time. It is a process that has served us well while delivering more than 1700 aircraft over the past decade, and one that we continue to refine as technology advances. Others follow similar processes, and it should be noted that Bombardier was far from alone in conducting business with holding companies through the failed Lithuanian Bank. Others include major western banks, American Express, the World Economic Forum, a charity run by Prince Charles, and even the late pop star Prince and the Chelsea football team. The Globe singles out Bombardier, obviously, to make it seem as if we had some distinctive role when the truth is that these commercial transactions were widespread. Readers should look at how more honest media outlets describe the transactions behind the “leaked” banking records. For example, The Guardian states that “There is no suggestion that end recipients of the funds were aware of the origin of the source money, which arrived via a disguised route. However, the [leaked] documents indicate that criminal and legitimate money may have been mixed together, making it impossible to trace the origin source, before passing through screen companies into the global banking system.” Even the source that provided these records to the Globe’s reporter, an investigative outlet called OCCRP, cautions that “the very purpose of such systems is to obscure the ownership of money that goes through them” and warns that the material must be viewed in that light. But the Globe blew right through those caveats in its blind zeal to malign us. The crucial point here is that even the best oversight systems and safeguards aren’t 100% fail-proof. That perspective is essential because when bad actors go to extreme lengths to conceal their misdeeds, the fault belongs with the bad actor, not the businesses that are misled. When banks or insurers advertise in the Globe, for example, is the paper at fault if one of those firms is later accused of wrongdoing? This missing context is what makes the Globe’s pretend outrage so troubling. At a time when the hardworking women and men at Bombardier Business Aircraft are achieving remarkable new heights, here’s hoping the press can start aiming a little higher too. Mike Nadolski Vice President Communications and Public Affairs Bombardier
  28. 2 points
    I completely understand your concern and at a political level I share it. I suspect I have done a poor job of articulating my apprehension here. If government interference was motivated by concern over job losses within the context of a new regulation, I'm prepared to cut them a bit of slack. But, if they had full knowledge of manifestly criminal (meaning subversive and treasonous activities) that took place during coalition operations and STILL chose to interfere.... it raises it to an entirely new level IMO. Is it just me? Am I looking at this wrong? I would like to think it is as simple as what you see it to be.... and, I would dearly like you to convince me that it is.
  29. 2 points
    I believe I may have mentioned it previously and I don't think the mods will mind as it is a window into the minds that created, designed, built & flew the aircraft - a really good thread about Concorde here.
  30. 2 points
    I wonder what it's going to take for the airport authority in YHZ to start funneling some of those AIF funds toward better winter maintenance and infrastructure, instead of baubles and beads.
  31. 2 points
    Sorry, gotta disagree - Saskatchewan is right about almost everything!
  32. 2 points
    Looks good. We flew on BEA from LHR-GLA-LHR in 1969. My father had interline passes and BEA delivered us from their London ticket office directly to the ramp parked Vanguard sitting us in club facing seats. Return flight was a Viscount. Talk about royal treatment!
  33. 2 points
    A friend of mine believes he is the only mechanic to work on both the Concord and that F1 car.
  34. 2 points
    According to the NTSB Twitter feed, they have the CVR and it is being transported to the NTSB facility in Washington.
  35. 2 points
    I think being able to eject the person talking to you may be even better.
  36. 2 points
    Well said. We should recognize that abuse and harassment often limits the ability of people to reach their full potential in the work force. This not only applies to gender, but think of the loss to society as a whole when entire races or classes are put down - i.e. when obstacles are put in their path rather than removed. When I look at our relationship with many first nations communities in places like Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Saskatchewan, I wonder how many of the damaged kids in those situations might be the ones who could come up with sa cure for cancer or an electricity storage idea that would help us arrest climate change. There is potential in all of us, and behaviour that limits people from possibly realizing their potential diminishes us all.
  37. 2 points
    Given the risk of what he was about to do, I suspect Colonel Glen may have done that as well.
  38. 1 point
    I would have but not now. Ontario’s Premier Doug Ford is bringing back photo radar speed traps. So.....
  39. 1 point
    I was looking forward to your story of him putting your old machines out of their misery from 10,000 ft!
  40. 1 point
    SW is not the only Canadian 705 carrier that uses this type of program. There are others doing it on a much larger scale.
  41. 1 point
    As they always have said, weapons do not kill people, people using weapons do. As to the terrorist, we seem to believe that they can be cured / rehabilitated...…. well IMO they are no different that other rabid animals and should be put down...….
  42. 1 point
    Yes, I see that; disappointing, as that is not the long-standing aviation culture that they are renowned for. In my view, Canada has taken the correct course of action. There is no basis for grounding the aircraft until there is data. The recorders have been recovered and are hopefully in the U.S. being read, there are SOPs that govern the operation of the MCAS now and millions of hours have been safely flown by the type since last October. The corrective action is comprehending what Boeing sent out in November of 2018 and ensuring crews thoroughly understand their aircraft and are capable of taking correct action using memory items and NNC's. The overheated internet/twitter/social-media environment makes it very difficult for people in charge to think and make rational, intelligent decisions based upon data, of which there is none, at present. To me, grounding an aircraft should occur when the regulator and/or the manufacturer cannot explain through normal means and ready evidence, a serious event, and can't create a response for crews to follow due to lack of data. The B787 grounding was of this sort, because the Lithium battery fires were not initially clearly understood. Here, there is a procedure which we know worked because the first Lion Air crew used it successfully. The stick-shaker and possible UAS is certainly a handfull for crews but all this is in "known" territory and is a training matter. There were 31 UAS events on the A330 and 30 were handled quietly by crews that understood the drill and landed their aircraft safely. The A330 was never grounded and correctly so. I think the same should apply to the MAX.
  43. 1 point
    Although anecdotal at best, I have noted the tendency of (dare I say) newer pilots to stop flying the airplane after the nose wheel touches down. Maybe I have it wrong, but I stand as a proponent of controls into wind, judicious differential braking (based on observed effect) and early (yet gentle) application of reverse.... increased slowly. Early selection of control locks and immediate entry into aggressively applied reverse is just uncomfortable and scary to me on a slippery runway; it reminds me of Dante’s assertion to abandon all hope.
  44. 1 point
    I have the advantage of starting my day on my schedule. I just start it an hour early in the summer because, on the bike, for some reason it takes me 4 hours to get home
  45. 1 point
    I include the Globe and Mail in that select group as well. only a half rung above the CBC. Whatever happened to the media reporting facts, and letting me make up my mind ??? Spin is such a prevalent commodity these days, it is actually quite sickening.
  46. 1 point
    Always nice to hear from the vocal minority
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    Don’t blame melting ice for polar bear attacks. Blame a bear baby boom Opinion: Some scientists still think it’s OK to mislead the public to promote climate change alarm A polar bear is seen walking across the street in Churchill, Man.Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press files February 27th is International Polar Bear Day, and what interesting timing it happens to be this year. In recent weeks the media have been all over the news that the Russian village of Belushaya Guba, on the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the southern Barents Sea had declared a state of emergency because more than 50 aggressive and fearless polar bears had invaded the community. Protected status for the bears meant deadly force was not an option for terrified residents, yet non-lethal efforts to get the bears to leave had been futile. Predictably, the blame was immediately put on sea-ice loss due to climate change — not by a scientist but by a Norwegian journalist who initially reported the story, adding in his own homemade, unscientific analysis. Pundits came out of the gate later, to add further layers of hyperbole, even after the original journalist followed up with another story recanting his original theories, headlined “Well-fed polar bears are not necessarily stuck at Novaya Zemlya due to climate change, experts say.” The primary problem was, in fact, the village’s garbage, with too many bears being a close second. There had been ice enough in late November to allow the bears to leave Novaya Zemlya as they usually do in the fall but they did not. Dozens of fat bears chose to stay for the winter because of easy access to stores of food and an open-air garbage dump. A few days after military personnel arrived and got serious about running the chubby troublemakers out of town, the bears took to the ice. But a week later, CNN was still pushing the imminent climate-change catastrophe meme using video footage of fat, healthy bears. https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/dont-blame-melting-ice-for-polar-bear-attacks-blame-a-bear-baby-boom
  49. 1 point
    Send your CV to Boeing. Perhaps the roof/floor hatch could double as a waste collector? Cabin crews could just sweep the galley scraps down into the hole. No need for pilots to stop in at Tim’s anymore.
  50. 1 point