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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/01/2022 in all areas

  1. Well, I think now that the truth is somewhere in the middle but the whole response was obviously chaotic and mishandled but I don't see why a couple of cops there didn't just take the bull by the horns and do what should have been done.
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  2. This is over the title of an existing book: https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/crtc-tells-radio-canada-to-apologize-for-offensive-language-on-air Imagine the apology due from Youtube for carrying rap music. Or the record companies that produce it. Or the legion of fans who listen to it. And what do we do about those fans who sing along (out loud) with the lyrics or play the music in a manner that might cause others to hear it? There might be a few classic books out there in need of burning too, Uncle Tom's Cabin comes instantly to mind. We now have regulatory bodies with the power to compel speech on full display.... on July 1 of all days.
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  3. https://nationalpost.com/news/health-canada-backs-down-from-nutrition-warning-labels-for-ground-meat-after-criticism?fbclid=IwAR1Zw6P_DUE6cWKxlZhTbmtn6gmGc0oVrD4cckvGfT2KCgzlwHwWY-dksl0
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  4. Found this little gem… Sharing from a Montréal Lead Ramp Agent. The struggle is real…if you have to travel, give yourself a few extra days…and if you don’t “need” to travel…stay home!!! "I just got home at 6am after a 14h day including 6h of overtime. I struggle to convey in words how much chaos there is at the airport right now. 1. Last night I saw SFO passengers crawling through the carousel to retrieve their bags ... from a secured customs area ... because they've been waiting 4 hours for them. 2. I saw FAs walk off flights because the pilots were flying illegally after timing out, and the FAs didn't feel safe because they knew how tired the pilots were. 3. I saw Delhi leave with 100 missing meals and STOC said send it anyway. 4. I saw a handicapped person with no legs crawl out of a plane himself because there was no wheelchair crew. 5. We've now reached 2019 peak rush times but with only 800 ground crew staff, compared to 1200 in 2019 (and we were barely making it then) 6. I've seen dogs being left in the bulk of a cancelled flight for 2 hours. 7. One guy on my crew today almost walked into a live engine because he was new. With only 5 weeks training, he had forgot ¾ of it cause it's so condensed. The higher ups in Toronto want to make that training 5 days instead of 5 weeks. 8. We no longer wait for passengers to connect. I dispatched FRA the other day with 50 missing passengers and STOC didn't want to wait. We don't wait anymore cause it delays all the flights in the gate moving forward. So we fly with whoever is onboard. From the bottom of my heart, tell your loved ones not to fly now. Regardless if they bring a bag or not. I saw the proposed schedule over the next year and a half and it's enough to keep me up at night. Anyway, for those of you travelling anyway... stay safe. Bring food and water with you. Don't ever check a bag. And if you do fly, don't connect. You'll miss it 100%. Rant over. I'm exhausted and going to sleep cuz I I only get 7.5h rest between shifts."
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  5. Thank god it was not a Scotsman with a kilt and a bag pipe...... political satire': Lynne Hoff discusses her controversial parade float Lynne Hoff was behind a controversial float in the Sundre Pro Rodeo's parade on Saturday, June 25, 2022. Tyson Fedor CTV News Calgary Video JournalistMore share options The owner of a contentious Alberta parade float that sparked controversy after photos of it began circulating online this weekend is speaking out. Lynne Hoff was behind the float, which appeared in the Sundre Pro Rodeo's parade on Saturday. It was a John Deere tractor pulling a manure spreader with the phrase ‘The Liberal’ on it in red lettering, driven by one volunteer dressed as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau while another volunteer, dressed as NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, sat on the back of it. Hoff says it was political satire. RELATED STORIES 'Deepest apologies': Central Alberta rodeo organizers shocked by parade float "The last thing it was, was racist," she told CTV News. "If the leader of the NDP party would have been a blond woman, I'd have been in there. It wasn't anything to do with the Sikh community." Hoff says Sundre is a very welcoming and inclusive town and that the float was motivated by a tumultuous two years of COVID-19 restrictions, federally and provincially. "These lockdowns have kept Sundre from having their parade for two years," Hoff said. "We just wanted to bring some levity and showcase that a little bit. There was laughter all the way down the parade route." Unsanctioned entry in the Sundre Rode Parade in the Alberta town that including depictions of Prime Minister Trudeau and NDP leader Jagmeet Singh. (Twitter)On Sunday, both the Sundre Pro Rodeo and the parade committee said they did not approve Hoff's entry. "The entry was not approved and, upon further investigation, joined the parade without passing through any registration," the committee wrote in a statement that was posted on the Sundre Pro Rodeo's Facebook page. Hoff says she is a supporter of the rodeo, but believes there may have been a miscommunication between organizers and herself. "I was a little surprised," she said. "I don’t sneak around about anything." "The Sundre Rodeo Committee is a wonderful group of people, they're all volunteers and I am not going to contradict what they said, but I think that there was a mistake." Hoff says those who found the float offensive have a right to be offended. "I don’t think it was done in poor taste," she said. "It was political satire." She says Canada has seen political satire dating back a century, referencing The Milch Cow, a political cartoon from 1915 depicting easterners raking in rewards from hard working western Canadians. A copy of The Milch Cow, a political cartoon from 1915."It shows the cow that is Canada," she said. "It shows Alberta feeding all the hay, Saskatchewan and Manitoba doing more work, and central Canada getting all the milk and that really hasn’t changed for 100 years." Hoff says anyone who found the float racist or offensive is welcome to visit Sundre. Mayor Richard Warnock says the town does not condone any type of racism. "We are extremely disappointed to learn about an unauthorized float and their attempt at a political statement gained access this past weekend to an event that our community has celebrated for years," said Warnock. When questioned if felt racism was not the intention of the float, Warnock said no. "I don't believe that racism was intended against the Sikh community," he said. "But nevertheless, it was taken that way, and therefore, we just can't have that." Sundre resident Neran Persaud says he is dismayed people suggested the float had racist undertones. "Come out here and see for yourself," he said. "Don't just sit in Calgary and yell 'racism' because you see something that you don't like. That was a political statement." Persaud says he has lived in Sundre for five years and has always felt welcomed. "I don't like it when people say that this is racism, and this town is racist," he said. "Look at me, I'm a man of colour, living in this town. I'm well accepted here and I've never had anything derogatory said to me." The parade committee does say that it is putting in place measures that will stop similar floats from showing up in the parade in the future. Calgary’s mayor Jyoti Gondek reinforced her view on Monday that the float had racist undertones. She says it drives people away from Alberta, a province she believes can have a bad reputation for similar events. “It’s not funny, it’s not amusing, you’re killing our economy by perpetuating this stereotype,” said Gondek. When asked what measures are in place to prevent a rogue float from joining the upcoming Calgary Stampede Parade, officials with the organization issued the following statement: The volunteer Parade Committee has a thorough selection process for its entrants, along with on route security to ensure the safety of participants and guests. "The Calgary Stampede Parade has been taking place for over 100 years and has always embodied the spirit of our community."
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  6. If you try to compare similar countries you will get a different picture. Try comparing the G7 countries or NATO countries with Canada. For your second statement, Country Oil reserves do not have much correlation with pump prices unless you have a nationalized market or some sort of a dictator regime. I don't detect any desire in your writings for such a market. It's an interesting list... Have a look at Norway at the extreme $$$ end... Good reserves, Gas producer and stratospheric prices. At the other end of the scale, you have Venezuala, Iran, Kuwait, Kazakhstan,Iraq, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Pakistan and the UAE with sub 1$US per liter gas. Those countries don't really appear as comparable. As far as comparables go... Gas in Europe, NZ, much of the eastern bloc is mostly higher than in Canada. The list has a few countries with lower prices that "could" be compared to Canada. The US, Australia, China, South Korea, Turkiye, Brazil, Japan all have cheaper gas... From most of the reading I have done, I am reaching the conclusion that high prices are going to be here for a while. The current Prime Minister is merely the figure head that was voted in prior to world prices sky rocketing. He's not going to fix it, and neither will a conservative government or the NDP...
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  7. Like most things, there are always at least 2 sides to a story. In Canada Day message, Trudeau says Canadian flag represents promise of a better life | CBC News Freedom Convoy protesters return to Ottawa for Canada Day | CBC News
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  8. Nato Summit: Did Justin Trudeau forget Australian PM’s name? - BBC News Biden calls Australian PM 'that fellow down under' - BBC News
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  9. Working hard to ensure that there is a large crop of mind controlled new Liberals. Jamie Sarkonak: Federal government effectively declares Red Ensign a hate symbol Special to National Post - 23m ago React17 Comments| © Provided by National PostJamie Sarkonak: Federal government effectively declares Red Ensign a hate symbol The federal government shouldn’t be telling K-12 teachers to monitor and discipline students for holding certain political views. But it’s part of a project the Department of Canadian Heritage paid $268,400 to do. Launched on June 29, an educational toolkit created by the federally supported Canadian Anti-Hate Network, and jointly announced with the government calls for a politically correct culture change in schools across Canada. Its 50-page guidebook is geared toward confronting and preventing hate — which would be fine if it didn’t include political beliefs, critical thinking, and Canada’s previous national flag among the evils to be confronted While some of the extremist organizations and hate symbols discussed in the guidebook are correctly classified as such, it extends this to “problematic” politicians and policies, as well. In a set of examples about hatred that must be addressed in the classroom, for instance, the guidebook places students who argue in favour of former U.S. president Donald Trump’s border wall among those who salute Hitler. This obviously goes too far — the federal government doesn’t have any place forcing political beliefs upon students. People in Canada have the freedom to agree or disagree with Trump, and students should be able to argue for or against his policies. Ahmed Hussen, the minister of housing and diversity and inclusion, shouldn’t be enthusiastically endorsing a guidebook that tells teachers to coerce students not to express themselves, but here we are. The guidebook encourages identity-based activism in the classroom, insisting that educators “increase the visibility of symbols of diversity and tolerance” in the classroom — including pride flags, culturally affirming posters and portraits of people from historically marginalized groups. It is a good thing for teachers to foster welcoming environments, but it’s dystopian for the feds to be nudging them to do it a certain way. Students who don’t go along with this illiberal narrative should have their concerns recorded and dismissed, according the toolkit. “Often, these students have little more than dogma to offer, but some students may have impassioned and intricate stances that have led them to this point,” it says. The guidebook goes on to list the Red Ensign , the official flag of Canada until 1967 and the one under which we fought fascists in the Second World War, as a symbol of hate promotion. Its use by modern fringe movements shouldn’t override its place in Canada as a symbol of unity, but the guidebook still claims that, “Its usage denotes a desire to return to Canada’s demographics before 1967, when it was predominately white.” If anything, the mainstream should reclaim it. Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965). Getty Images/iStock Photo Ironically, the document even advances the harmful stereotype that women are perpetual victims of hate . Women with incorrect politics, it says, are useful propagandists for men who wish to use them to propagate large families . It seems to encourage the view that women don’t have agency unless they agree with a particular brand of progressivism. To ensure compliance and accountability, the guidebook encourages peer-to-peer surveillance, suggesting that students monitor each other’s activity outside of class and check source materials for “problematic affiliations.” Throughout the document, it tells witnesses of hateful content to gather evidence, document their experiences and report them to multiple trusted adults in the school system. It encourages a level of institutional paranoia, in effect saying that everyone has a duty to enforce these new social norms on everyone else. Monitoring should be proactive, as well. Among its “ best practices ” is a recommendation for schools to search student devices, both school-owned and personal, if possible, at any point in time: before, during and after the circulation of “hate-promoting ideas.” This, of course, violates the basic privacy of students and seems over-broad, considering that the vast majority of students do not deserve to be searched because of a few bad apples. There are a lot of common-sense objections to the radical version of inclusivity that the federal government appears to want to promote in Canadian schools. The main one is that it infringes on freedom of expression. Yet the Canadian Anti-Hate Network dismisses this, instead saying that calling for freedom of expression when someone wishes to censor an idea is the same as yelling “fire” in a crowded theatre. Similarly, the guidebook says that complaints that social justice is being imposed too harshly on everyone are simply a far-right dog-whistle. It all goes too far. While this new guidebook isn’t yet part of any education program, its creators intend to lobby provincial governments to incorporate its content into K-12 curricula. Hopefully, provincial governments will be smart enough to say “no” to this one. The feds have no place policing the political views of students. National Post
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