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  1. Kind words Kip. Thanks. You know the hurt all too well, when someone who occupies a big part of your heart is taken away... I am familiar with the rainbow bridge, and I love the notion... Thanks for the reminder. It was not my intention to focus on such painful feelings though... Lets leave them unsaid and carry on with the banter? Shall we?
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  2. Re Dogs......my middle son had a Chocolate Lab while at Queens..."Ellis" died at 13 1/2...He had a Yellow Lab, "Yukon" and he died at 10.5, (Renal failure) and the he had "Rumple", British Red Lab that just passed away 3 weeks ago, nearing 14 years....The passing of his dogs really puts him a funk so I can understand how you felt when Griffon left you, but take heart,....apparently you will meet your best friend on the Rainbow Bridge.. All the best my friend and keep smiling , keep them guessing
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  3. Once again, the Pivot story has absolutely nothing to do with Air Canada, Jazz, or Rouge. Please start a new thread.
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  4. And of course the person who said this should be named: NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said while he is aware of previous bills’ failures, he believes this private member’s bill, sponsored by NDP MP Taylor Bachrach, is unique. “I think there is a feeling across the world that democracy is in threat, and we're seeing the rise in some cases of fascism, the rise of, or an erosion of democracy and some examples of that. In light of that, I think there is a stronger conviction around how do we support democracy, how do we make sure our democratic systems function well and have good participation and remain vibrant,” Singh said Tuesday.
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  5. Analysis-Foreign pilots rush in as U.S. carriers struggle to staff up By Rajesh Kumar Singh and Allison Lampert - 4h ago FollowView Profile React2 Comments| 9 © Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS By Rajesh Kumar Singh and Allison Lampert (Reuters) - Pilots are back in demand in the United States. But carriers cannot find enough of them, so foreign pilots are rushing to fill the empty cockpits. U.S. immigration lawyers report a surge in inquiries and visa applications from pilots based in countries where traffic is still recovering from pandemic lows. That could bring some relief to an industry struggling to rebuild capacity after a two-year slump, but the trend is stirring a backlash from domestic unions. It also reflects an uneven global recovery from COVID- 19. Coronavirus infections are still rising in many countries although pandemic curbs have been easing in some places. While booming travel demand is projected to help major U.S. carriers surpass their pre-pandemic revenue this quarter, airline traffic in some parts of the world remains depressed. "While the U.S. has a major shortage, in the rest of the world pilots are out of jobs," said Ana Barbara Schaffert, an attorney at California-based AG Immigration Group She has received more than 8,000 requests for consultation in recent months, and is screening over 2,000 resumes from pilots seeking to immigrate to the United States – up more than 90% from before COVID-19. According to United Airlines, pilots are expected to remain in short supply for years. Whereas the United States can produce a maximum of only 7,000 pilots a year, carriers need 13,000 pilots this year and even more next year, United Airlines said. Limited training capacity, among other issues, remains a barrier to producing pilots. Staffing woes have marred operations in recent weeks at carriers such as Alaska Air Group Inc and JetBlue Airways Corp, resulting in mass flight cancellations. To prevent further disruption, airlines have cut summer schedules. Shortages are even more acute at regional airlines, which are facing a soaring attrition rate because of poaching by higher-paying national carriers. American Airlines Group Inc last month told investors the pilot attrition rate at its regional carriers was outpacing the hiring rate. That is drawing interest from pilots in Canada, Europe, Africa and Asia where traffic is still recovering, said Carmen Arce, an attorney at Florida-based Arce Immigration Law. Arce and Jean-Francois Harvey, global managing partner at Harvey Law Group, said they are also getting inquiries from pilots in Russia, where airlines have been hit hard by Western sanctions.Unmute Three Canadian pilots said they are considering moving to the United States because of Canada's previous strict COVID-19 restrictions, which grounded planes earlier during the pandemic and forced some aviators to seek employment as drivers for Uber Technologies Inc. 'UNPRECEDENTED' OPPORTUNITY Many foreign pilots have hesitated to apply since immigration in the United States can take up to 26 months and cost as much as $20,000, with no guarantee of success. "It's like if you wanted to go to Colorado for the (19th century) gold rush, but you were stopped in Michigan," said a Montreal-based pilot for Transat AT Inc's Air Transat. "If the green card process changed in the U.S., there would be a lot more pilots leaving (Canada)." Even so, Schaffert said a widening demand-supply gap has created an "unprecedented" opportunity for experienced foreign pilots. First, they must convince U.S. immigration officials that permanent residency would be in the country's interest. Under the so-called national interest waiver clause, non-U.S. citizens are allowed to apply for permanent residency without a job offer, making it easier to immigrate. Schaffert said more than 90% of the applications submitted by her firm for experienced pilots have been approved. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) did not supply data on applications from pilots. But a spokesperson said the agency determines requests on "a case-by-case basis." The Federal Aviation Administration says the number of foreign-licensed pilots seeking U.S. certificates required to fly large jets increased to 718 in 2021, up about 24% from 2019. BARRIERS TO FLIGHT Foreign pilots are also facing opposition from local unions. They want airlines to do more to address barriers to becoming a pilot like the high cost of training, instead of recruiting foreigners. The Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), the world's largest pilot union, with more than 62,000 members, said there is an "adequate" domestic supply of qualified pilots. "ALPA opposes any efforts to use the visa process to undermine pay and benefits for a profession so critical to the U.S. economy and global travel," it said. Regional and ultra-low-cost carriers like ExpressJet Airlines, CommutAir, Breeze and Frontier Airlines are recruiting Australian pilots, who can use a special visa. Faye Malarkey Black, head of the Regional Airline Association, said giving other foreign pilots a similar kind of visa would ease the staffing problem. SkyWest Inc, which operates flights for Delta Air Lines, American and United, recently dropped 29 government-subsidized routes, blaming insufficient pilots. While the routes were later restored, regional carrier Mesa Air Group called SkyWest's move the "tip of the iceberg" and warned the problem could hit mainline carriers. Already, pilots from Delta Air Lines have been picketing at the carrier's hubs, demanding an improvement in "fatiguing" schedules. Southwest Airlines pilots are also complaining of rising rates of fatigue. United has grounded 150 planes because of insufficient pilots. Black said carriers have cut one of every three flights they operated before the pandemic. "It's the classic game of musical chairs," Black said. "When you don't have enough chairs for everybody, something gets cut." (Reporting By Rajesh Kumar Singh in Chicago and Allison Lampert in Montreal; Editing by Tim Hepher and Matthew Lewis)
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  6. Canada under Justin Trudeau
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  7. Inflation Nation: Experts warn rising prices are here to stay It's getting too easy, and a bit depressing to boot. Think I'll stop reading the news for a while, I can certainly conjure up stupid ideas as well as any liberal and I don't think I need their help to do it. Anyway, would these (MBA Crew) experts be the same experts who previously provided the expert opinion that inflation was a good thing, something to aspire to, and the sign of a robust economy? The only thing they've been right about (and it's a recent development IMO) is the pilot shortage... and they worked hard at creating it.
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  8. Canadian airline crew detained in Dominican Republic urges Ottawa for safe return after drug seizure Tue May03, 2022 - The Globe and Mail by Alanna Smith An airline whose crew was detained in the Dominican Republic along with its passengers after alerting authorities to 200 kilograms of cocaine hidden in an internal compartment is urging the federal government to intervene ahead of a court hearing that could force them back to jail. Eric Edmondson, chief executive officer of Pivot Airlines, sent a letter to Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly asking her to call on the Caribbean country to ensure the crew’s safe return to Canada. “For more than 24 days, our crew has been subject to threats against their lives, inhumane treatment and arbitrary detention for dutifully reporting a crime and averting a potential aviation disaster,” Mr. Edmondson wrote. “Time is of the essence.” Five Pivot Airlines crew members and six passengers were scheduled to return to Canada from Punta Cana on a chartered aircraft on April 5. Before takeoff, a mechanic discovered suspected contraband on board and police in Canada and the Dominican Republic were alerted. If the plane had taken off, Mr. Edmondson said, the location of the contraband could have sparked an uncontrollable fire. Dominican authorities jailed all 11 people on the plane, sending men and women to separate facilities, according to the airline. On April 6, the Dominican Republic’s National Directorate for Drug Control released a statement that said the group was “being questioned to determine their possible involvement” in the attempted shipment of illicit drugs. Two-hundred kilograms of cocaine, stashed in eight gym bags, was seized from the aircraft. Mr. Edmondson said the men were sent to a prison meant for narcotics criminals and were subject to harassment and beatings. The airline hired someone to ensure Pivot staff were fed and protected to some extent in prison, he said. The group was granted bail, but is not allowed to leave the Dominican Republic. Local prosecutors are attempting to appeal the court’s bail decision. It is not clear when the hearing will take place. Mr. Edmondson said prosecutors don’t have evidence connecting the crew to the cocaine. Death threats have continued since their release, and the airline has hired private security and relocated the crew regularly to avoid detection. The passengers have separate legal counsel and are not staying with the airline staff. Mr. Edmondson said the crew members are afraid being returned to prison would be a death sentence. “It’s a one-way ticket,” he said. “They don’t think they’ll be coming out of that jail if they get put back.” Global Affairs Canada said in a statement that it is aware of the incident involving Pivot Airlines and that Canadian officials are monitoring the situation, engaging with local authorities and providing consular assistance. Adrian Blanchard, press secretary to Ms. Joly, also said that Parliamentary Secretary Maninder Sidhu recently travelled to the Dominican Republic and met with government officials. Mr. Edmondson said the government must do more. “The government, we think, has to step up and intervene. It’s unacceptable a Canadian airline crew can be incarcerated wrongfully,” he said. The federal government is urging Canadians to exercise a high degree of caution if they travel to the Dominican Republic, citing violent and opportunistic crime. The Foreign Affairs Ministry in the Dominican Republic did not respond to a request for comment. Family members have confirmed the identity of one of the passengers as Calgary-based photographer Brittney Wojcik-Harrison. A cousin, Bella Harrison, said the family learned about her imprisonment last Thursday from a lawyer in the Dominican. “It just feels like a movie and, when it was happening, I almost didn’t believe it,” said Ms. Harrison, adding that her cousin had been vacationing in Punta Cana. “She’s really not okay. ... She’s just trying to keep her head above water.” Ms. Harrison said Global Affairs Canada has provided little information to the family owing to provisions of the Privacy Act. She said Ms. Wojcik-Harrison is in a safe location. “I’m just really shocked because I’ve been proud to be Canadian my whole life and just to see how little they care about this person that literally would never be involved in this, I just don’t understand that,” Ms. Harrison said. “How can they just forget about 11 people?”
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  9. Oregon Schools Implement “Menstrual Dignity Act” Requiring Tampons in Boy’s Bathrooms Oregon Democrats force public schools to distribute menstruation products in boy's bathrooms. I'm pretty sure these folks don't believe their own nonsense. When I see them feeding laying mash to roosters (that hipster urban chicken thing) I might start to believe they actually believe what they say they believe. Annoying parents (who weren't previously annoyed) is certainly a winning tactic in the run up to midterms. Nothing screams "good idea" like getting between parents and their children in a provocative and money wasting manner. Keep up the good work.... I'm rooting for ya. ------------------ Now, If you refuse to believe any of that is a bad thing, maybe you should consider the notion that bedrock institutions are collapsing in front of your very eyes. Do you trust the government now, how about the media, have the RCMP been upfront about the NS Shooting or is it all deliberately cloaked in a BS moniker of "Mass Casualty" instead of mass murder. How about banks, or maybe the courts eh? The subject matter here (below) doesn't matter, what matters is the leak; what matters is judicial integrity.... or the lack of it. Add that to the list now. Is anyone keeping score here or are the 70 percenters responsible for electing these fools too busy feeding laying mash to their roosters? Some people seem to take umbrage at the notion of 70 percenters... too bad. Add up the percentage of liberal, NDP, Green and block voters in Canada. Let me know what you get. Without looking I call 65% (plus or minus). Roe v Wade Supreme Court opinion leak is historic act of judicial destruction The significance of the Roe v Wade Supreme Court leak cannot be overstated
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  10. So while the liberals in Ottawa were busy smearing truckers and bikers as rascist, homophobe, white supremeacists blah blah blah and civil unrest was going to takeover the city……a real protest took place in Montreal with violence and hate…but you didn’t hear about it from trudeau or his lap dog media: https://westphaliantimes.com/may-day-black-bloc-rioters-attack-videographer-who-filmed-them-smashing-windows-in-montreal/
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  11. I have 2 nieces that plant over half a million trees every year. There are many other hard working kids doing the same. Pays one heck of a lot better than Walmart ever will, as far as summer jobs go. Similar to The Back Breaking Weed of the 1960's (no longer available from the National Film Board archives!)
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  12. Rex Murphy: Pierre Poilievre's appeal is fuelled by Trudeau's never-ending sanctimony Since when is playing to the people worthy of scorn? “ The present government is tireless in implying that the Canadian electorate is not living up to it, to the high woke visions of its leading ministers and spokespeople. That the people are failing the government. That the electorate has a lot of fixing up to do before they are worthy of Singh-Trudeau Liberalism. They are constantly going on that Canadians are racist, homophobic, transphobic, misogynist, colonialist, white supremacist and deficient in all the current and most fashionable virtue poses. Do you ever get the impression that when Trudeau is apologizing “for Canadians” that implicitly he is asking Canadians to apologize, to him? Looking down on your electorate is, I suppose, one way of avoiding the dread populist label, but it may equally build up, over time, some energetic backlash. Perhaps this is a clue to our enigma. A lot of the fuel in Poilievre’s rocket is coming from a massive leak from the other guy’s. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-pierre-poilievres-appeal-is-fuelled-by-trudeaus-never-ending-sanctimony
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  13. I can see it now….. Liberals propose law banning drone from carrying illegal cargo!
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  14. And yet...... So much for media reports vs as I suspect yours is (Live experience). Thanks for your input.
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  15. Not to worry, the Liberals will pass a "feel good" law against this type of activity sans any ability to enforce......
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  16. How the ‘jack-in-the-box’ flaw dooms some Russian tanks Mon May 02, 2022 - The Washington Post By Sammy Westfall and William Neff The sight of Russian tank turrets, blown off and lying in ruin along Ukrainian roads, points to a tank design issue known as the “jack-in-the-box” flaw. The fault is related to the way many Russian tanks hold and load ammunition. In these tanks, including the T-72, the Soviet-designed vehicle that has seen wide use in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, shells are all placed in a ring within the turret. When an enemy shot hits the right spot, the ring of ammunition can quickly “cook off” and ignite a chain reaction, blasting the turret off the tank’s hull in a lethal blow. Other tanks on the modern battlefield generally store their ammunition away from the crew, behind armored walls. The Russian T-72 main battle tank’s ammunition sits in a carousel-style automatic loader directly beneath the main turret and members of the crew. If a penetrating hit on the tank’s relatively thin side armor detonates one of these rounds, the explosion can set off a chain reaction, killing the crew and destroying the tank. “For a Russian crew, if the ammo storage compartment is hit, everyone is dead,” said Robert E. Hamilton, a professor at the U.S. Army War College, adding that the force of the explosion can “instantaneously vaporize” the crew. “All those rounds — around 40 depending on if they’re carrying a full load or not — are all going to cook off, and everyone is going to be dead.” British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace this week estimated that Russia has lost at least 530 tanks — destroyed or captured — since it invaded Ukraine in February. “What we are witnessing now is Ukrainians taking advantage of the tank flaw,” said Samuel Bendett, an adviser at the Center for Naval Analyses, a federally funded nonprofit research institute. Ukraine’s Western allies have provided antitank weapons at high volume. Ukraine, too, has been using Russian-made T-72 variants, which face the same issue. But Russia’s invasion has relied on the large-scale deployment of tanks, and Ukraine has been able to fight back better than expected. The flaw speaks to a broader difference in approaches between Western militaries and Russia’s, analysts say. Why Russia gave up on urban war in Kyiv and turned to big battles in the east “American tanks for a long time have prioritized crew survivability in a way that Russian tanks just haven’t,” said Hamilton. “It’s really just a difference in the design of the ammo storage compartment and a difference in prioritization.” Ammunition in most Western tanks can be kept under the turret floor, protected by the heavy hull — or in the back of the turret, said Hamilton. While a turret-placed ammunition storage compartment is potentially vulnerable to a hit, built-in features can prevent the same level of decapitating devastation seen in the case of the T-72. Even the early versions of the American M1 Abrams tanks in the 1980s were fitted with tough blast doors separating the crew inside from the stored ammunition. These tanks have a crew of four, including a loader who opens the ballistic door manually. These were designed to be stronger than the top armor, so that if ammunition is cooked off, the explosion would be channeled upward through blowout panels, rather than into the crew compartment, Hamilton said. On the battlefield, Ukraine uses Soviet-era weapons against Russia On the other hand, Russian tanks rely on mechanical automatic loaders, allowing them to be manned by a team of three. The design of Russian tanks prioritizes rate of fire, firepower, a low profile, speed and maneuverability vs. overall survivability, said Hamilton. Russian tanks tend to be lighter and simpler, and have thinner, less-advanced armor than Western tanks. The design vulnerability was probably “just cheaper and lighter,” Hamilton said. Newer Russian models have come out since the T-72, which was produced in the 1970s by the Soviet Union. One of them, the T-14 Armata, has been described as a sophisticated battlefield game-changer since it debuted at a 2015 military parade. But the Armatas have not yet seen much use outside parades. Newer variants of the T-72 have come with greater tank protections, Bendett said, but the prevailing principle has been the same: a three-person crew with a lower profile, and shells in a circle within the turret. For the U.S. military, Hamilton said, “if the tank is destroyed and the crew survives, you can make another tank more quickly than you can train another crew.” For Russia, “the people are as expendable as the machine,” he said. “The Russians have known about this for 31 years — you have to say they’ve just chosen not to deal with it.”
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  17. Too bad those who "knew" didn't due the right thing and turn him in.....
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  18. FIRST READING: Another Liberal gun policy that neatly ignores where the guns come from Tristin Hopper - 3h ago © Provided by National PostThe vast majority of Canadian handgun crimes are committed with firearms smuggled in from the U.S., such as these pistols seized at a Manitoba border crossing in 2011. TOP STORY With Liberal officials now openly mulling the idea of a nationwide ban on handguns, they are simultaneously pursuing reforms that would slacken the penalties for cross-border gun-smugglers. And according to police in Canada’s most violence-afflicted cities, it’s these smuggled guns that are a far deadlier problem for Canada than the legal ones have ever been. Starting in 2018, the Trudeau government began examining the possibility of a “full ban on handguns and assault weapons in Canada.” So far, this has only yielded proposals to allow cities to ban handguns at the municipal level — a measure that, while welcomed in the likes of Toronto and Montreal, has been vocally opposed in Alberta. This week, senior sources quoted by the National Post’s John Ivison said that a total handgun ban remains a “last resort” in the result that more localized bans don’t take. Meanwhile, the House of Commons is still considering Bill C-5, an act that would repeal a host of mandatory minimum penalties, including those for smuggling firearms. Bill C-5 was drafted to address what it called “systemic racism in Canada’s criminal justice system.” By reducing the amount of prison time for criminal offences, reads a backgrounder, the idea is to reduce the “overincarceration rate of Indigenous peoples” as well as for other “marginalized Canadians.” While the bill would reduce prison time for non-violent offences such as drug trafficking or selling black market tobacco, it also repeals the minimum sentences for more than a dozen violent crimes ranging from aggravated sexual assault with a firearm and “hostage taking, use of a firearm.” Four of the bill’s repeals also relate to the gun-smuggling trade, including the charge of “weapons trafficking.” Nevertheless, it’s smuggled guns that seem to be comprising an ever-growing share of handguns used in crimes. In February, Toronto Police Deputy Chief Myron Demkiw told the House of Commons public safety committee that of the crime guns his department has been able to trace, 86 per cent were illegal firearms smuggled in from the United States. When asked about federal efforts to curb Canadian legal gun ownership through buyback programs, Denkiw replied that it “is certainly not going to deal with the crime problem we’re facing in Toronto, as it relates to the use of criminal handguns.” As far back as 2008, a report by the Province of British Columbia similarly found that the “vast majority” of guns being used illegally in their province originated in the United States. A 2021 investigation by CityTV outlined just how easy it was to get illegal guns into Ontario from the neighbouring U.S. states of Michigan or New York. Moving firearms into the Greater Toronto area could be as simple as throwing a bag over a border fence to be retrieved later. Illegal firearms were also moved through cross-border First Nations reserves and via secret compartments in private cars — some of which were not even known to the car’s owners. With vanishingly few exceptions, legal handguns exist in Canada only as antiques or sporting equipment. Any firearm with a barrel shorter than 470 mm cannot be used for hunting, which means that pistols (or “restricted” firearms) occupy a particularly strict realm of Canadian law. While an unloaded long gun can be kept in the trunk of a vehicle or even legally carried in most jurisdictions, restricted firearms can only really be kept in a safe, at a certified range — or in a vehicle driving between one of those two places.
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  19. And now that people have been distracted by the inquiry in the Use of the Emergency Measures, the sleight of hand continues with the mass causality commission:
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  20. AGAIN “ Yet another allegation against the Freedom Convoy was debunked this week as Ottawa police announced they had identified the woman who stood atop the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in January, saying she was not associated with the convoy truckers. The Ottawa Police Service (OPS) said on Thursday that it had dismissed a case against a Quebec woman who was filmed at the National War Memorial on Jan. 29, the first Saturday of the convoy protests. The woman, whose name has not been released, was standing atop the Tomb of the Unknown soldier, yelling “freedom.” As reported by Blacklock’s Reporter, the OPS said in a statement that the woman was “spoken to, showed remorse for her actions and police are confident she will not re-offend.” “There was no admitted association to the Freedom Convoy truckers,” said OPS spokesperson Carole Macpherson.” The incident was one of many during the Freedom Convoy that legacy media outlets and politicians blamed on the truckers and freedom protesters before any investigation had been conducted. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau alluded to the incident in his first public statement about the convoy on Jan. 31, referring to it as a “desecration.” “I know you’re wondering about what you saw in our capital this weekend,” Trudeau read from a prepared statement. “Freedom of expression, assembly and association are cornerstones of democracy, but Nazi symbolism, racist imagery, and desecration of war memorials are not.”
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  21. As allies visit Ukraine's capital, Canada's absence is being noticed Canadian Embassy should not be among first out, last back in: former Ukrainian ambassador to Canada Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi shake hands during their meeting in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Saturday. Canada has not sent any high-profiles to meet Zelensky since Russia invaded his country earlier this year. Sun May 01, 2022 - CBC News by David Common In the month since Russia's retreat from Ukraine's north, the capital Kyiv has seen a frenzy of high-profile visitors: 11 prime ministers, Austria's chancellor, the U.S. secretaries of state and defence, its House speaker, the UN secretary-general — even Hollywood star Angelina Jolie. Canada has not sent even a cabinet minister. Ukraine has noticed. "When you physically see a friend, an ally … present in the capital, that would mean a lot," said Andriy Shevchenko, who was until recently Ukraine's ambassador to Canada. It's not just the question of a visit. Twenty seven nations have reopened diplomatic posts in Kyiv — but Canada's embassy in Kyiv remains locked up, vacated prior to the start of the war. "Canada was one of the first countries to move the embassy out. We do not want Canada to be the last one to return," said Shevchenko. Foreign Minister Mélanie Joly has said plans are in the works to reopen. "We need to make sure the security situation on the ground allows for it," her office said in a statement. Others have moved faster. Poland and Georgia never left. Italy and The Netherlands reopened their mission, as did the United Kingdom. Kyiv is "the right place to be," Britain's ambassador told The Guardian newspaper. With the largest Ukrainian diaspora outside former Soviet states, Canada has claimed to be one of Kyiv's biggest supporters, making the absence of a high profile visit and an open embassy all the more puzzling for some. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's office did not directly respond to a question about a possible visit, but said in a statement that he and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky "remain in frequent contact, in addition to regular contact across the federal government with their Ukrainian counterparts." Why a visit is important Many VIP visits to Ukraine's capital include stops north of the city where Russia left a trail of destruction in its aborted northern front. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres visited Bucha, scene of mass graves, and Irpin, a leafy suburb outside the capital where half the buildings were razed in Russia's initial invasion. Bulgarian Prime Minister Kiril Petkov visited the smoldering ruins of Irpin, and told a CBC News crew it is imperative that world leaders visit because "it's very different when you make public statements from the comfort of your office. It's very different to see it first hand." Canada's contributions to Ukraine Since the outbreak of the latest chapter in nearly a decade of on-and-off conflict between Russia and Ukraine, the federal government has pledged support. That process went into overdrive after February's invasion. But some countries have been far more generous, relative to the size of their economies. Poland, for instance, is approaching 1 per cent of its total GDP in contributions of both financial and military support. Canada did not rank in the top 12 of donors in a tracker established by Kiel University in Germany at the end of March. Since then, Canada has committed an additional $500 million in support. The Biden Administration has requested an additional $33 billion US in aid for Ukraine, the majority for purchases or transfers of military equipment. American and Canadian soldiers are training Ukrainian soldiers — outside Ukraine — on the use of sophisticated M777 howitzers, which have a range of 30 kilometres. When equipped with high precision Excalibur shells, they are accurate to within 10 meters. "We greatly appreciate all the Canadian help, the weapons and the military training and the financial support," said former ambassador Shevchenko. Canada gave Ukraine four of these big guns. Australia, with a smaller population, offered six. The U.S. transferred 90. European nations have also purchased or dispatched military equipment from their own stocks, though they are more at risk of Russian retaliation. Many remain reliant on Russian gas to power their economies. Poland and Bulgaria were cut off last week. Others may follow. Canada, however, does not depend on Russian gas and, by virtue of its geography, is less vulnerable to Russia's orbit.
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  22. I guess it is just me, but it seems to be a very long time between finding the CVR, sending it for repairs, and actually being advised of any content.... .I guess a conspiracy theory could be,....... the Chinese are reluctant to release anything that might make any Chinese airline look bad.
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  23. When the time finally comes, I think that the CBC and their liberal acolytes will be utterly shocked by the extent and rapidity of the backlash. Dr. Leslyn Lewis vows to defund CBC to thunderous applause at GTA campaign stop Rebel News asked Dr. Lewis that given the amount of falsified news emanating from the legacy media these days, would she take a page from Pierre Poilievre’s playbook and defund the CBC? The answer: yes. Cue the biggest ovation of the evening.
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  24. How phantom forests are used for greenwashing By Navin Singh Khadka Environment correspondent, BBC World Service How phantom forests are used for greenwashing - BBC News Canadian Reality: 2 years after Trudeau pledged to plant 2 billion trees, only 8.5 million have been planted 2 years after Trudeau pledged to plant 2 billion trees, only 8.5 million have been planted | CBC News
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  25. All of which brings us to the helicopter. The helicopter is not the kind of thing that the RCMP or the commission appear to be eager to discuss in public. According to the GC Surplus documents, on January 20, 2015 Wortman - operating as buyer 1122342 — offered $235,000 for a 1979 Sikorsky S76A helicopter. The twin-engine medium helicopter is like those used by the coast guard, police in provinces outside Nova Scotia, air ambulances or by executives. It can seat up to 12 passengers. The helicopter can fly 740 kilometres on a tank of fuel. Wortman didn't win the bid for the helicopter, but the very fact that he had tried to get it raises obvious questions, like why would a Dartmouth denturist be interested in such an exotic machine? To attempt to answer that question would cause the MCC to veer into a territory it appears determined to assiduously avoid - Wortman's criminal operations and what the police knew and didn't know about them. Just about everyone who knew Wortman in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were keenly aware that he had long been involved in smuggling cigarettes, alcohol, drugs and guns, among other things, across the border with Maine. The only ones who didn't seem to know about all this, if you believe their story, are the police, especially the Mounties.
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  26. Astounding Hypocrisy !
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